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Tamiya TRF415

Old 09-22-2004, 03:27 PM
  #3931  
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hope this question doesnt sound too stupid but.......

what is the advantage of running the diff over the spool/1way?

Stew
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Old 09-22-2004, 04:06 PM
  #3932  
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It really depends on your setup & driving style/ability.

But if you want to know about any "advantages" one might have....

One-Way: Pro: Acceleration Con: Heavier & no brakes
Spool: Pro: Acceleration Con: Heavier (if aluminum) & hell on axles
Diff: Pro: lighter Con: Not as quick Acceleration

Handling wise...You have to get out there and decide on your own!
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Old 09-22-2004, 04:19 PM
  #3933  
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try running mod foam on carpet with One way diff and pulley..... then you'll understand. It can be done, but you'll be much slower than running diff or spool.
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Old 09-22-2004, 05:27 PM
  #3934  
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Does anyone know the part number for the red metal shock topper? The part that goes over the ball nut?

Thanks
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Old 09-22-2004, 05:38 PM
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Originally posted by s2
hope this question doesnt sound too stupid but.......

what is the advantage of running the diff over the spool/1way?

Stew
hey stew.. im not an expert in the matter.. but one thing i do know, when you run a one-way.. using your brakes is much more difficult.

the car will spin out if you do not do it right. so most people run a diff so they can use brakes. a spool is the combination of both. you get the same advantages of a one way... but you get to use brakes.

if you need a spool.. check out www.speedtechrc.com. steve has a good one for the 415.

diffs, you can probably pick up all the necessary parts to make one yourself. (see earlier pages for the part numbers) again steve should have the parts (if not, he'll be more than happy to order them for you).

hope that helps!
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Old 09-22-2004, 06:48 PM
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Originally posted by Hebiki
hey stew.. im not an expert in the matter.. but one thing i do know, when you run a one-way.. using your brakes is much more difficult.

the car will spin out if you do not do it right. so most people run a diff so they can use brakes. a spool is the combination of both. you get the same advantages of a one way... but you get to use brakes.

if you need a spool.. check out www.speedtechrc.com. steve has a good one for the 415.

diffs, you can probably pick up all the necessary parts to make one yourself. (see earlier pages for the part numbers) again steve should have the parts (if not, he'll be more than happy to order them for you).

hope that helps!
a spool is the combination of both. you get the same advantages of a one way... but you get to use brakes.

still can't get this one. care to explain this further.
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Old 09-22-2004, 06:58 PM
  #3937  
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Just got mine built.
I was wondering if anyone is having any trouble with the aluminum ballstuds snapping off in a crash, they look a little cheap.
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Old 09-22-2004, 08:08 PM
  #3938  
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Originally posted by Peter Busch
Just got mine built.
I was wondering if anyone is having any trouble with the aluminum ballstuds snapping off in a crash, they look a little cheap.
Greetings,

Yes, I snapped one off of my steering nuckle once. I bought some extras just in case it happened again. I wouldn't recommend changing to the steel ones though, because you would just keep chasing weak points from there on. The ball studs are inexpensive and come in packs of ten. I guess it's just a matter of not hitting anything.

cheerz
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Old 09-22-2004, 08:50 PM
  #3939  
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Originally posted by danjoy25
a spool is the combination of both. you get the same advantages of a one way... but you get to use brakes.

still can't get this one. care to explain this further.

Not quite the same advantages...A one-way will freewheel off power and lock up on power, giving you more steering throughout the entire corner. The problem is you can't stop the car if someone or something jumps out in front of you.

A spool is locked all the time, giving you great pull (steering)out of the corner but requires a different setup to get steering entering and mid corner. BUT, you can brake with the car if someone jumps out in front of you which lets you drive more aggressively.

Recap....
one-way= more steering all through the corner but no brakes

Spool= push entering and mid corner (setup can cure this) and mad steering out of the corner. AND brakes
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Old 09-22-2004, 10:02 PM
  #3940  
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Check out cookies website for an article he wrote regrading diffs..

www.cookieitsallgood.com

He explained all the pros and cons for each one. useful stuff.
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Old 09-23-2004, 01:34 PM
  #3941  
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Originally posted by Dragonfire
thats a complicated way of putting it...

With the same springs.....

moving lower shock mounting out towards wheel makes suspension stiffer, moving inward makes suspension softer.

moving upper shock mount has the same effect in the same differctions but to a smaller degree.

There are also some other side effects other that harder/softer suspension but that is getting complicated.

Generally speaking... if the track is very flat/smooth, run shocks outward on lower arms. If its rough run shocks inward on lower arms.
U got it wrong there mate. Moving the bottom of the shock outwards (towards the wheel) makes the suspension progressively softer throughout the movement, thus giving the effect of a softer spring. Moving it inwards makes it less progressive thus giving the feeling of a stiffer spring.
Try working it out by drawing little diagrams an using triganometry.
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Old 09-23-2004, 02:20 PM
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Originally posted by Phil C
U got it wrong there mate. Moving the bottom of the shock outwards (towards the wheel) makes the suspension progressively softer throughout the movement, thus giving the effect of a softer spring. Moving it inwards makes it less progressive thus giving the feeling of a stiffer spring.
Try working it out by drawing little diagrams an using triganometry.
I think you'll find Dragonfire is in fact correct. Moving the lower shock mounting point out on the arm (toward the wheel) makes it firmer due to less leverage applied to the spring - ie closer to the wheel, less leverage applied, further in on arm, more leverage applied.
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Old 09-23-2004, 02:52 PM
  #3943  
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i think the large amout of terms have made this abit confusing...

shock positioning;

the upper and lower shock mounting points determine how much leverage the lower suspension arm has on the shock when compressing the shock, and therefore the progressiveness of the suspension. the different positions affect how the shock reacts to compression.

shocks more inclined;
more progressive, smoother feel and more lateral grip

shocks more vertical;
more direct feel, but less lateral grip



lower shock mounting positions;

outer (closest to wheel) - harder damping
inner (closest to centre line) - softer damping


i think you guys were confusing progressivness and actual damping softness, easily done


i guess its alot to read an take in but read it a few times and itll all make sense
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Old 09-23-2004, 03:28 PM
  #3944  
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Default Shock Positioning

Go get yourself a copy of the XXXMain Chassis Setup Guide

http://www.xxxmain.com/bookz.shtml

It explains shock positioning plus everything else you need to know about chassis configuration and how it effects weight transfer

Order it over the web or ask your local hobby shop to order it in for you
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Old 09-23-2004, 03:45 PM
  #3945  
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I agree with the later posts, the bottom mounting of the shock is usually a coarse type adjustment and is very similar to increaseing/decreasing spring rate. Move shock Out and you get less leverage from the wishbone making it feel STIFFER. Moving the mounting inwards gives greater leverage and therefore gives a SOFTER suspension setup. The top is a very fine adjustment in comparison and helps or stops the cars tendency to roll therefore picking up grip. The more laydown the shock the easier it will roll as the arc shape made by the movement of the wishbone makes. This makes the car feel in reality softer. The more stood up shock will not allow this roll so much as it will feel stiffer.

Hope this is SORTA correct

Rob
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