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Tekno RC EB410 Thread

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R/C Tech ForumsThread Wiki: Tekno RC EB410 Thread
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Welcome to the EB410 Wiki page.

Basic Stats/Features:
  • Shaft drive (tapered AL for light weight and straightness)
  • Gear differentials (all 3)
  • Low Angle CVAs (with captured pins so no ejecting them!)
  • Durable stub axles with 12mm hexes and optional offset adjustments
  • Reverse bellcrank steering system
  • Quick access bulkheads (for easy diff maintenance and tuning)
  • Spllt center diff holder (for easy diff maintenance and tuning)
  • 8th scale style motor mount (for easy mesh adjustment)
  • 13mm big bore shocks
  • 3.5mm shock shafts
  • Droop screws

Videos
Servo Horns
Tekno included a plastic servo horn but also offers an aluminum one. This is highly recommended. Here's a list of servo horns that have been found to work:
Gearing:
Works out of the box for mod or 13.5.
  • Preference for Associated factory team pinions
  • Start mod gearing around 21t pinion
  • Start 13.5 gearing around 29t pinion with the stock spur (81tooth). If using a Tekin Spec R 13.5, start with a 24t pinion for medium sized indoor tracks.
  • Internal Gear Ratio: 2.5:1
  • For comparison:
  • B64 is 2.47:1
  • 22-4 is 2.4:1
  • YZ4 is 2.6:1

Wheels
  • B6/22/rb6 wheels direct fit
  • 22-4/XB4 front wheels direct fit
  • B64 front wheels will fit, but you need the +1 hexes (can use #TKR1654X, which is a +1mm hex)
  • 22 2wd front wheels will also fit, possibly a good option for carpet.

Setup Sheets and other documentation
Setup sheets for all Tekno RC vehicles can be found here. Please be sure to try our recommended setup. It works very well on most tracks.
Piston Drills:
Some of our setups recommend using pistons that are enlarged. For instance 4x1.9 or 3x2.0. To drill the pistons we recommend the following:
Aftermarket Upgrades:
Warranty Policy:
Tekno RC is the only company in the industry that will give 50% off of parts if returned to them using the General Warranty return policy found on their website. The parts can be lightly used or completely abused, as long as the part is still being produced it's covered!


Build Tips:
  • When fastening the steering posts with a 5.5mm socket wrench, you can back space the socket with some nuts to help drive the post into the bulk head

  • Place an alcohol swab over metal threads and drive screws through the swab to clean both sides of threads before applying thread lock

  • Use a metallic marker to indicate what fluids you have filled in your diffs for easy identification

  • Apply thin layer of grease on crown gears to help hold gaskets in place for easy hole alignment

  • Bags F and H have 2 different size set screws, be sure to use the smaller 3x3mm screws for the hexes or you may run into problems installing wheels over the hex if you use the longer 3x4mm screws
  • To make is easier to slip the o-rings on the shock cap bleeder screws, apply a drop of shock oil and slip them over a 1.5mm hex bit, then line up the bit with the screw and transfer the o-ring over using fingernails or needle nose pliers
  • pinch+rotate shock caps in 17mm hex wrench to improve roundness
    More shock build tips here
  • Use a 3.05mm drill bit or 3.05mm Kyosho arm reamer, 1/8" drill bits are not recommended because they are 3.17mm in diameter and tend to introduce too much slop, the pins are roughly 2.97mm in diameter
  • Replace the stock 3x14mm screws (TKR1405) with 3x20mm screws (TKR1409) in step H-10 in the manual in order to increase durability to the bulkhead.

  • When installing the front and rear differentials into the bulkheads be careful when tightening the 3x8mm screws of the cover that holds the diff in place. Bottom out the screws first (use a hand driver and make it hand tight) then check the diff to make sure it rotates smooth. If it binds up, start by backing out each screw 1/8-1/4 of a turn until the both front and rear diffs move freely. The plastic threads will keep the screws in place so don't worry if you think the screws are not secure.
  • When installing the steering hub kingpins (TKR6596), drive each one in hand tight only. Then check the movement of the steering hub. If it binds up, back out the kingpin screws by 1/8-1/4 of a turn until it moves freely. Then install the set screws (TKR1601) to hold it in place. Only drive the set screw in until you make contact with the kingpin. Do not force it.
  • If using the low profile servo mount, be sure to use smaller OD (outter diameter) washers to avoid rubbing on the center drive shaft. Protek ball stud washers are a good example of the acceptable diameter. You can chose to not run washers though it is recommended to use them as it makes for a more secure mount.

  • Ball Cup Alternative from AE: ASC91453. These are used as a harder composite option if you are not happy with the softer stock plastics. Note that these are approximately 2-3mm shorter and require compensation when building your kit to the manual specs to achieve proper camber/toe settings


  • Wheel Nut Alternative: Yokomo 4mm Thin Aluminum Serrated Flanged Nut

    https://www.amainhobbies.com/yokomo-...-n4flt/p541494


  • Moving Rear Shocks to the Front of the A-arm

    This is the break down of what's required by one of the Eb410 FB users.

    Joey A.

    So since there has been some people wondering about running the shocks in the front of the arm I though I would try explaining everything that I did to get them to work and why. My goal was to run as much stock stuff as possible with the least amount of modifications.

    -Arms- need to be flipped and 1mm shaved off the back (spacing the arm farther back) running it this way the car is still a mm shorter then stock but more material could be removed for more adjustability but I have found no need to make the car longer.

    -Inner ball stud- there are 2 ways of mounting, the first can be used with the stock plastic tower. All you need to do is use a 10mm ball stud instead of the lower shock mount screw and a little clearance from the shock tower and diff case. Using this method will work but the ball stud is moved lower and farther in then the stock locations which requires different pivot locations to try and correct roll centers. The other way (preferred) using the option carbon tower drill a hole higher and farther out if done properly you will be able to get the ball stud location in the correct hight(0mm) and between the two stock locations.

    -Shocks- only 2 changes from stock you will need to space the top shock mount 2mm out. You will also need to run around 1.5-2mm less droop depending on your setup.

    -Sway bar- this is the hardest part of the swap. This can be done a million ways I chose to print a mount in the stock ball stud location which allowed me to use the stock swaybars and arm mounting position. You can also bend your own bar and use the stock mounts on the back. You will have to drill your arms on the other side and closer to the pivot for this to work (remember you will need a thinner bar the closer you mount the lower pickup on the arm to get the same feeling as stock).

    -Other- you will need to remove the drop screws on the rear arm. Depending on rear rims,hubs,ballcups and setup you might need to clearance the outer ball cup so it doesn’t rub on the wheel.

    -Why- the benefits of running the shocks in the front are the ability to run a softer rear shock package without giving up corner speed and pack. The car will land without chassis slapping or packing out as easy allowing you to drive the car harder and it corners flatter and rotates faster without losing rear grip.

    Sorry for the shity grammar,
    TJR

    Sway bar mount for forward mounted shocks: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Tekno-EB410...4AAOSwYNxahFkq

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Old 03-30-2017, 12:46 PM
  #211  
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Originally Posted by latentspeed View Post
Proper weight distribution is ideal. Not just shove the esc in the back while leaving the front empty, while there's a 50-60g servo on the other side. Been waiting for brands to do something about it, but the ones that have a different layout are belt driven.
While that may be true with say the D413, that isn't the case with the Durango as its mounted down the centerline. The weight balance using the ESC behind the motor versus the shorty on the other side was much better as you can imagine.

The question then became how much of a benefit do you see from the raised sections for clearance. The durango setup is much higher than I think they probably needed but they went with gear they appear to have already had on hand versus say a small spur like the D413 has in comparison. To get even more balance I ran the rest of the gear (receiver and transponder) in the middle.

With electronics oriented towards the rear, this does a good job for loose tracks apparently. For something more high traction, seen setups with electronics more towards the front on the two platforms I have owned when reviewing setups.

If Tekno can offer the EB410 that gives balance options to both the front and rear while still using a shaft drive, that will be something.
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Old 03-30-2017, 10:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Cain View Post
While that may be true with say the D413, that isn't the case with the Durango as its mounted down the centerline. The weight balance using the ESC behind the motor versus the shorty on the other side was much better as you can imagine.

The question then became how much of a benefit do you see from the raised sections for clearance. The durango setup is much higher than I think they probably needed but they went with gear they appear to have already had on hand versus say a small spur like the D413 has in comparison. To get even more balance I ran the rest of the gear (receiver and transponder) in the middle.

With electronics oriented towards the rear, this does a good job for loose tracks apparently. For something more high traction, seen setups with electronics more towards the front on the two platforms I have owned when reviewing setups.

If Tekno can offer the EB410 that gives balance options to both the front and rear while still using a shaft drive, that will be something.
I've had the first version dex410. Good responsive steering. People complained that it was over aggressive, but when the skid plate chassis weight was added the car was balanced. Add the side weights and the rear was stuck to the ground.

But that's not the point. It's possible but I doubt tekno will follow Durango having the servo centered with the drivetrain over it. Since the drivetrain is facing up coming out of the bulkhead, and the dog bone cvd was angled straight you had to be sure to grease it up often. You know the center driveshaft needs greasing when it burns you after running. I'm not in favor of that for the 410 unless universals come standard.
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Old 03-31-2017, 06:29 AM
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when they went with version 5, it had a much better planted rear end. Really enjoyed the car other than the crap wing mounts. If they had not dropped their racing team could have been interesting to see what could have been done with that car.

With Tekno we have seen they are dedicated to racing as well as communication and improvements, should be good times.
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Old 04-01-2017, 11:38 PM
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Rod ends are a plus, more reliable then ball cups. I think schumacher is the only wheeler using them.
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Old 04-02-2017, 01:28 AM
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Originally Posted by latentspeed View Post
Rod ends are a plus, more reliable then ball cups. I think schumacher is the only wheeler using them.
Only drawback is that my K2 tends to strip servo gears from time to time, I've heard some prefer to run servo savers and they will break as well, but the cost to replace servo gears is about a wash when you flip stripped gears around. It would be nice if they could figure out a way to shrink down 1/8 servo savers for use in the wheelers and that would be king!
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Old 04-02-2017, 06:29 AM
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Tekno has a lot of people on the hook for this one, great sales pitch.
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Old 04-02-2017, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by billdelong View Post
Only drawback is that my K2 tends to strip servo gears from time to time, I've heard some prefer to run servo savers and they will break as well, but the cost to replace servo gears is about a wash when you flip stripped gears around. It would be nice if they could figure out a way to shrink down 1/8 servo savers for use in the wheelers and that would be king!
What servo are you running that you're stripping gears? Myself and a few other here at Tekno don't run servo savers on our SC and 8th scale buggies and I don't believe any of us have stripped gears. We've had a few plastic case servos get a little loose at the output shaft but that's about it.
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Old 04-02-2017, 08:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Matthew_Armeni View Post
What servo are you running that you're stripping gears? Myself and a few other here at Tekno don't run servo savers on our SC and 8th scale buggies and I don't believe any of us have stripped gears. We've had a few plastic case servos get a little loose at the output shaft but that's about it.
We're talking about the Schumacher K2 and how it uses captured links... I was explaining the trade off with captured links and the added stress that is placed on the servo (without a servo saver). I've been using a PowerHD 8312 in most of my cars, I currently race 5 classes with this servo, and over the course of 7 years of racing, the only car I've stripped with this servo is the K2. I have had problems with a Radiopost RPS2207M in my 1/8 buggy, but swore off that servo after replacing 2 gears with the internal gear within a gear stripping out, I believe that to be a fundamental design flaw with Radiopost IMO.

On my PowerHD 8312, it's the main spline gear that's stripping out, I simply rotate the gear 180° and drill a new 2mm hole on the opposite side to remount the swivel pin:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8020/2...4ec15c73_c.jpg

I probably strip this gear once every dozen or so race days and it usually involves a very nasty crash... never broke a single part other than 1 shock shaft on the car, but having to swap a stripped gear every so often isn't any big deal to me, I always keep a spare servo in my pit box.

As far as my Tekno SCT410.1 goes, it has a built in servo saver (on the steering post) and never stripped a servo gear on that car over the 4+ years I've been racing it, so if the EB410 uses a shrunk down version of the same servo saver, then that would be awesome
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Old 04-02-2017, 12:05 PM
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did a 1/10 buggy ever make everyone talk so much because it came out ?
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Old 04-02-2017, 04:18 PM
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So does the summer date mean it will be officially announced in the summer or ready for sale in the summer?
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Old 04-02-2017, 04:50 PM
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Originally Posted by billdelong View Post
Only drawback is that my K2 tends to strip servo gears from time to time, I've heard some prefer to run servo savers and they will break as well, but the cost to replace servo gears is about a wash when you flip stripped gears around. It would be nice if they could figure out a way to shrink down 1/8 servo savers for use in the wheelers and that would be king!
A good servo will damage its case first before its gears strip. That's why certain brands make optional all metal cases. Some completely tighten their servo savers in 8th scale and don't often run into problems. Stock plastic horns get stripped out in 8th scale, but not often in wheelers, at least from my experience. In any case a servo saver would be nice. Although consistency and direct steering feel would decrease.

I just don't like ball cups. Easy to pop on and off, but it pisses me off that driving on bumpy surfaces alone can cause that. Popping off doesn't mean that if it didn't pop off something would have broken.

I'm hoping the 410 will come with rod ends and servo savor. Although I'd just tighten the servo savor all the way down. lol I use ko rsx servos so it won't be a problem.
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Old 04-02-2017, 06:23 PM
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I use solid aluminum horn in all my cars, and not seeing any damage to the plastic servo cases that have stripped titanium gears, although I recently swapped out to a Tessman edition servo on my K2 to see how well it can handle the abuse with captured ball ends... unfortunately the 1/10 program in our area is on hold as they rebuild the track (to include new building enclosure) with Astroturf. Also not convinced that a 1/8 servo saver fully tightened won't still allow some play in the harshest landings/crashes. I tend to run my savers a bit on the tight side as well.
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Old 04-02-2017, 08:01 PM
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Originally Posted by billdelong View Post
I use solid aluminum horn in all my cars, and not seeing any damage to the plastic servo cases that have stripped titanium gears, although I recently swapped out to a Tessman edition servo on my K2 to see how well it can handle the abuse with captured ball ends... unfortunately the 1/10 program in our area is on hold as they rebuild the track (to include new building enclosure) with Astroturf. Also not convinced that a 1/8 servo saver fully tightened won't still allow some play in the harshest landings/crashes. I tend to run my savers a bit on the tight side as well.
When I mentioned earlier that we aren't running servo savers in our 8th scales, I meant we're running our optional crank that is a solid piece. It's the one in the middle as opposed to the 2 piece saver next to it. The only save the servo could see is when the plastic parts flex.

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Old 04-03-2017, 12:59 AM
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Sucks for you. I'm using mks servo for my 48.3, the same that Bornhorst uses. He tightens his saver to one turn out. Never seen him fail to finish a race because of busted servo gears. Never had issues myself. Also use ko rsx servos. Even if your servo gears are made of titanium, the size, width and mesh of it's gears also determine how much they can take. Just because it's titanium doesn't make all titanium servos equal. Brands like ko have the least amount of backlash and nothing else is as quiet or smooth.

Bottom line 8th scale will punish servos more than wheelers. They weigh twice as much on wider front tires. Plastic servo horns are destroyed easily in 1/8, but not a problem in 1/10. Nonetheless I wouldn't worry about it unless you know for certain the 410 won't come with a servo saver.
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Old 04-03-2017, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Matthew_Armeni View Post
I meant we're running our optional crank that is a solid piece.
Thanks for the clarification... I've heard nothing but good things about MKS servos... I agree that 1/8 cars will typically provide more abuse on servos but I wonder if longer linkages might offer a little more flex? I'm also running full aluminum steering rack in my K2 so there's practically no slop and no flex which is nice for precise steering output, but there's no forgiveness when landing with steering full lock from a large triple on a high traction surface, eventually over time, the gears in my Power HD servo will strip out (with no servo saver and aluminum horn)... if the Tessman servo fails in the same fashion, then I might give MKS a shot to see if their metal is any better. I've also started testing an aluminum case brushless servo from JX in my 1/8 Truggy and have been very happy with it so far too:
JX BLS-HV7032MG I might give this one a shot before dropping $250 on an MKS servo which then begs the question at what point is it cost effective?

Let's say I go through 2-3 servo gears a year at a cost of $45 replacement total max... or go through 4-6 servo savers as a cost of roughly the same, then how many years of racing the same chassis is it worth buying a more expensive servo... and will the more expensive servo guarantee to hold up too?

I don't think there's any right/wrong solution, just different philosophies of spending about the same amount of cash over time.
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