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Beginner Servo Questions

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Old 03-10-2019, 02:53 PM
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Questions?? Beginner Servo Questions

In regards to a 1/10th Electric Buggy (XRAY XB2C) if that is relevant.

1) How do you know what size servo to get in terms of dimensions?
2) Why would you choose a standard size over a low-profile and vice-versa?
3) Why would you choose a high-torque over a high-speed and vice-versa?
4) Why aren't there any in-between (medium-torque medium-speed) version of servos (that I've seen anyway)?
5) What are the long-established high-quality brands of servos?

Any other tips you think would be of use would be appreciated as well.

Thank you for your time.
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Old 03-10-2019, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by xelferwols View Post
In regards to a 1/10th Electric Buggy (XRAY XB2C) if that is relevant.

1) How do you know what size servo to get in terms of dimensions?
2) Why would you choose a standard size over a low-profile and vice-versa?
3) Why would you choose a high-torque over a high-speed and vice-versa?
4) Why aren't there any in-between (medium-torque medium-speed) version of servos (that I've seen anyway)?
5) What are the long-established high-quality brands of servos?

Any other tips you think would be of use would be appreciated as well.

Thank you for your time.
1.There aren't many sizes. You're going to need either a standard or low-profile servo, as you say in...
2. Choose low-profile if you want to save weight. Know that they're generally not as durable. That said, I've never broken the one I use in my 2wd buggy (Futaba 9550)
3. Always go high-speed for 1/10. As long as it makes 100oz/in or better, you're good. High torque variants are better for bigger/heavier 1/8 stuff.
4. While they wouldn't be labeled as such, these are essentially lower prices servos.
5. Futaba. All of my servos are 10 years old or older

metal gears are a must. Most current cars don't have built in servo savers. Plastic gears won't last long.
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Old 03-10-2019, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by xelferwols View Post
1) How do you know what size servo to get in terms of dimensions?
Standard size or low-profile standard size.

Originally Posted by xelferwols View Post
2) Why would you choose a standard size over a low-profile and vice-versa?
You would choose a low profile for a couple reasons. Maybe you want a lighter servo to reduce weight. Alternatively maybe you want to make room to move all the electronic (ESC and RX) more forward to shift weight on the chassis. Or maybe you just want more room for the electronics mounting period.

Originally Posted by xelferwols View Post
3) Why would you choose a high-torque over a high-speed and vice-versa?
You have a buggy, high torque is overkill. More for trucks, 1/8, etc.

Originally Posted by xelferwols View Post
4) Why aren't there any in-between (medium-torque medium-speed) version of servos (that I've seen anyway)?
Because pretty much everyone is hung up on highest torque and/or fastest speed. So that is what sells, they would make a servo that would be perceived as less performing and thus sell poorly.

Originally Posted by xelferwols View Post
5) What are the long-established high-quality brands of servos?
Futaba, KO Propo, Sanwa/Airtronics have all been doing it for decades and you can't go wrong with any. They are also typically the most expensive, and there are now lots of lower cost options which are more than decent. ProTek, Savox, etc. MKS and Xpert are other reliable options.
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Old 03-10-2019, 06:30 PM
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As the others have stated, if you want a quality product with great support, Futaba, KO and Sanwa hands down!

Yes there are other manufacturers, as noted. I run Power HD and also Protek a lot too. But in my race cars / buggies as I run a Futaba Radio, its only Futaba Servos for me.

The best thing about the big name brands is the fact that more than likely your servo may see much more duty in more chassis as you go. Also parts for these are a bit easier to come by as well.
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Old 03-11-2019, 12:43 AM
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Thanks for the replies. Another question... I noticed some of the high-end servos have full metal cases. Does that serve a purpose or is it just bling?
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Old 03-11-2019, 01:10 AM
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Old 03-11-2019, 01:14 AM
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Its a lot more secure when the top of the case at a minimum is aluminum. For some that are running Higher end radios and such that want the most out of their Car, it is the easiest way to avoid any discrepancies in the servo. Also the fact with the newer Servos and HV the case can act as a heat sink to dissipate heat better.Not to mention the are a bit more robust as well. I run full Alloy cased servos in 1:8 Truggy and 1:8 Buggy.
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Old 03-11-2019, 01:25 AM
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Thanks again. And I understand what brushless means. But what does "coreless" mean?
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Old 03-11-2019, 01:29 AM
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Originally Posted by 1/8 IC Fan View Post
But in my race cars / buggies as I run a Futaba Radio, its only Futaba Servos for me.
Are you saying there is a benefit to running the same brand Servo as your Radio?
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Old 03-11-2019, 01:34 AM
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Originally Posted by xelferwols View Post
Are you saying there is a benefit to running the same brand Servo as your Radio?
If you have a radio that has Super Response capabilities such as the new Futaba 7px or Sanwa M17 then yes. If you are running a regular radio then you are just fine running any Servo.

Ie. You can run Protek, Savox, Eco Power, HD etc. no matter what, but if you want the SR & SSR features, you need to stick with the brand with the compatible Servos.
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Old 03-11-2019, 05:48 AM
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I would caution that the single most important feature not to overlook is "steering speed" adjustment. Many pros recommend a servo speed in the range of 0.08 to 0.12 sec/60 but everyone has different reaction times, our reaction times also degrade with age, it will be nearly impossible to predict what speed is perfect for you. I'm in my 40's and I'm running 0.08 servos at 88% speed to suit my desired reaction time. If I was younger, I could probably handle full speed of my 0.08 servos. Anyway, most low end radios will not typically include this feature but keep this in mind if you're also shopping around for a new radio system, I consider it a must have tuning feature for me

*** I also make adjustments to my steering speed depending on traction conditions and tire wear as well, for example if my front end starts to push as the tires wear I might go up as far as 92% steering speed until my lap times start going off pace, then I replace a new set of tires and start back at 88% again as an example. Key indicator for me when I need to go up/down on my steering speed is when my car is pushing or traction rolling, respectively.
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Last edited by billdelong; 03-11-2019 at 06:07 AM.
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Old 03-11-2019, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by xelferwols View Post
But what does "coreless" mean?
That is a common asked question you could find answers with a simple search task.
Coreless is w/o a metal core. The rotor has only copper windings which are held in shape by some epoxy glue. Due there is no metal core the rotor is lightweight and can spin up very fast to high revs making these servo's fast and direct.
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Old 03-11-2019, 10:46 AM
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Originally Posted by billdelong View Post
I would caution that the single most important feature not to overlook is "steering speed" adjustment. Many pros recommend a servo speed in the range of 0.08 to 0.12 sec/60 but everyone has different reaction times, our reaction times also degrade with age, it will be nearly impossible to predict what speed is perfect for you. I'm in my 40's and I'm running 0.08 servos at 88% speed to suit my desired reaction time. If I was younger, I could probably handle full speed of my 0.08 servos. Anyway, most low end radios will not typically include this feature but keep this in mind if you're also shopping around for a new radio system, I consider it a must have tuning feature for me

*** I also make adjustments to my steering speed depending on traction conditions and tire wear as well, for example if my front end starts to push as the tires wear I might go up as far as 92% steering speed until my lap times start going off pace, then I replace a new set of tires and start back at 88% again as an example. Key indicator for me when I need to go up/down on my steering speed is when my car is pushing or traction rolling, respectively.
How do you adjust the servo speed? Is it done manually on the servo or through software?
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Old 03-11-2019, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by xelferwols View Post
How do you adjust the servo speed? Is it done manually on the servo or through software?
It's a feature that comes with most high end radios and can be implemented in many different ways. I am currently using a Graupner X-8E



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