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What solder is best for electronics?

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What solder is best for electronics?

Old 07-07-2019, 11:09 PM
  #16  
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Never. Not for aviation anyway.
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Old 07-24-2019, 05:39 AM
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I recommend Weller WLC100 40-Watt Soldering Station.

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Old 07-24-2019, 07:50 PM
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Originally Posted by glennhl View Post
I buy the Kester 63/37 .031" dia solder off of the Bay. I never buy a pound of it because it has a 2 to 3 year shelf life. I go to the Bay and a guy on there will sell 30 feet (1.1 oz) of the 24-6337-0027 solder for $8. This lasts me 2 to 3 years and then I buy it again. If I got a pound, it would take me 20 years to use it all.
I buy solder by the pound and use it to the end of the roll even if that takes many years, so I was curious about your statement regarding shelf life. I did some searching and found info on shelf life of solder with the most important data point being the un-cored solder has "infinite" shelf life. In other words, it is not the solder it self (the metal) that has a limited shelf life - it is the flux in the solder.

This relieved any concern I might have had because I always use and rely on flux other than what is in the solder
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Old 07-25-2019, 10:25 AM
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I am not very good at soldering.. but when I switched to (Kester 63 / 37 3.3% / 44 .8mm ) and used a larger flat tip on my 70w iron.. it got much easier.

I know the 63 / 37 is the tin to lead ratio but not sure what the other numbers mean, but it works great for soldering motors and battery connectors. My tips also seem to last longer, could be I am just getting things done faster so less stress on the tips.

Interesting about the shelf life, growing up my father always bought the large rolls and we would used that stuff for a long time without issues He can solder very well, used to do circuit boards as well. He knows what he is doing with it.
My current 1lb roll is stamped for Nov/10/17 as the D.O.M so I figured it should be fine for another couple years.
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Old 07-25-2019, 10:31 AM
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40 watt iron is to cool for our needs in rc..
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Old 07-25-2019, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by the rc guy View Post
40 watt iron is to cool for our needs in rc..
I think that may depend on tip size, mass, and some other stuff.
I will, however, admit to using a 45 watt iron myself, not a 40. The 45 watt iron I use has a rated tip temperature of 1000 F. I generally only run it at 80% setting on the WLC-40 base.
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Old 07-25-2019, 10:24 PM
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A 40 watt iron is possible, but barely. I used to use it. I had to turn off the fan lol. And it had better be a warm day. Even then it struggles with 14 AWG, and simply cannot work on 12 AWG.

That's when I decided to upgrade to an 80 watt iron.


Somebody mentioned RoHS. Actually quite a misguided regulation. They wanted to reduce the amount of lead being disposed of, and I think prevent it leaching into water sources. The problem was something like 90% of waste lead comes from used 1:1 scale car batteries, not electronics. I believe car batteries can be recycled.
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Old 03-30-2020, 03:39 AM
  #23  
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Iíve found Kester and Multicore solder to be pretty good. I have one roll of each brand, both 60/40. Both manufacturers offer different diameters of solder, as well as 63/37 solder and lead-free options.
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Old 03-30-2020, 08:52 AM
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I've been using the included tip (3.?mm) that came with my Checkpoint and Hakko soldering stations for years and never had an issue soldering anything. When I switched to the 5.2mm tip everything was much easier and faster to solder. 10 and 12 gauge are very easy to solder. Regardless of the type of solder (I'm still using some 60/40 flux core Radio Shack solder) going to a wider tip will help speed things up. I still keep the smaller tip on my Checkpoint iron just in case I need to solder smaller gauge stuff.
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