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Refreshing my Kyosho SC6

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Refreshing my Kyosho SC6

Old 12-01-2019, 10:53 AM
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Default Refreshing my Kyosho SC6

Hey guys, I have a Kyosho SC6 that needs some help. It was in good shape when I quit racing it a few years ago, but has been sitting in the shed and accumulated some surface rust on some small parts. The driveshafts, turnbuckles, some of the screws and bearings have some minor surface rust. I want to take this thing apart and make it like new again. What is the best way to clean surface rust off these parts? I don't want to spend a ton of money on new parts, but I will if I have to.

Thanks,
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Old 12-01-2019, 10:54 AM
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Old 12-01-2019, 12:23 PM
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Something I've been doing, is to soak all the steel hardware in Diesel fuel for about an hour. Stir up the parts once in a while. Friend of mine bought a Used X-ray XB2C from eBay, it looked just like your SC6. Soaking won't remove all of the corrosion, but it definitely will clean it up quite a bit.
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Old 12-01-2019, 12:49 PM
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I am going to pickup a screw kit, some lundsford turnbuckles and an Avid bearing kit. That should take care of the small parts and speed things along. I also found this video and is what I plan to do if you are interested:

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Old 12-01-2019, 03:31 PM
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Naval jelly.....
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Old 12-02-2019, 05:39 AM
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I've seen that video. Ryan has a great channel. Lots of good info.

Screw kit would definitely save time, and the hassle. I just did it for that particular X-ray since it needed much more important things... Like bearings, outdrives, CVDs.. and a handful of plastic parts. Nothing from X-ray can be called cheap to buy, so.. yea. Lol.

Keep updating this thread. I'd love to get my hands on an SC6 since my only short course experience has been a stupid Slash.
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Old 12-02-2019, 07:14 AM
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Amazon Amazon

Best product I have ever used for cleaning metal parts, do not place any rubber parts in there or they will dissolve! Rust will be gone in just a few hours, or leave dipped over night for really bad rust formations.
After you pull your hardware from the dip, be sure to spray them with some WD40 Dry Lube PTFE and your hardware will look like new with almost no effort into cleaning everything up!
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Old 12-02-2019, 07:44 AM
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Rebuilds are cool.

I have about 10 different old cars i will rebuild later.

i will do it with Real Car brake cleaner . I buy 1 gallon cheap .
Then after i do WD40 bath and wipe with towel everything. 5 litre WD40 is cheap way go.
1 of that mostly reach 1 year for me. And if you need spray it just take one old, or new flower spray bottle universal

This has work good for me


My brake cleaner is cheap no name/brand stuff i buy cheap
WD40 i use what you see in picture
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Old 12-02-2019, 07:54 AM
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Uuhh....naval jelly. Cheap, simple, effective.
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Old 12-02-2019, 09:13 AM
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Turned out to be much simpler then I thought it would be. I backed the screws half way out, sprayed them with liquid wrench and scrubbed. I used a drill and metal polish with a Brillo pad on the turnbuckles, shock shafts and driveshafts. I then took it apart, cleaned everything with simple green and silicone lubricant. I replaced a couple bearings, rebuilt the diff and new shock o rings. It really does look like new again. Iíll post a pic a bit later.
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