Go Back  R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Rookie Zone
Stupid noob question >

Stupid noob question

Stupid noob question

Old 10-06-2017, 10:37 PM
  #1  
Tech Apprentice
Thread Starter
 
sum guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Vietnam
Posts: 70
Default Stupid noob question

So as you know, there's always an amp rating on an esc (60a, 120a, etc). What does this mean though? Been in the hobby for a while and I really don't know the meaning of this rating lol.
sum guy is offline  
Old 10-07-2017, 03:40 AM
  #2  
Tech Master
iTrader: (1)
 
DirkW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Germany
Posts: 1,065
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

They often even have two amp ratings.

In theory, they give you the maximum current the ESCs can handle without getting damaged. They usually give the continuous (and on many also the short time peak) rating.

Whether or not ESCs can really handle e.g. 160A for a long time and/or >700A in bursts is up for debate. Some components in them probably will be able to handle these currents - but the whole unit, as installed in the car (with all the wires and plugs in the game)? I wouldn't bet on it.
DirkW is offline  
Old 10-07-2017, 06:23 AM
  #3  
Tech Apprentice
Thread Starter
 
sum guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Vietnam
Posts: 70
Default

thanks.
sum guy is offline  
Old 11-20-2017, 09:58 AM
  #4  
Tech Apprentice
iTrader: (7)
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 91
Trader Rating: 7 (100%+)
Default

Just make sure the esc you have is rated for the motor you are using. A 17.5 motor requires less amps than say a 5.5 motor.
Mononga is offline  
Old 12-01-2017, 06:00 AM
  #5  
Tech Adept
iTrader: (5)
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 145
Trader Rating: 5 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by sum guy View Post
So as you know, there's always an amp rating on an esc (60a, 120a, etc). What does this mean though? Been in the hobby for a while and I really don't know the meaning of this rating lol.
Hobbywing has good reliable equipment.
patyroach is offline  
Old 12-01-2017, 08:07 AM
  #6  
Tech Regular
iTrader: (10)
 
kevinatfms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: MD
Posts: 480
Trader Rating: 10 (100%+)
Default

As others have stated above if the ESC is rated at 120amps its the continuous rating the ESC can handle for an extended period of time. The burst rating is the highest draw that the ESC can handle for a short period of time before it overheats or overloads.

Although 700amps is an insane amount of power and I believe most of the RC connectors that people use today will melt right around 300 amps or so. I know Anderson Power Poles and original Deans connectors are good to more than 350 before things start to happen(melting/SC/wire desolder). The larger XT60 and XT90 connectors can handle more from what I have heard.
kevinatfms is offline  

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.