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Old 08-29-2002, 06:50 PM
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Talking New to on-road racing

Hello all,

I'm a veteran off road hobbiest, but I recently purchased my first on-road car. On the advice of a friend I bought an Electric TC3 Accord. It arrived last week and as of this morning I am done building/painting. You can check it out below.

The local hobby shop has races every Saturday morning and I plan to go up there and race next week. However, being new to racing a car, I have no idea what to expect. I went up and watched others race but had to leave soon after I got there.

Does anyone have any hints or tips for a first time racer?
Thanks!
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Old 08-30-2002, 12:32 AM
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Be smooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooth, very very smooth. As far as the car itself, keep the drivetrain free, weight balanced as even as you can left-right, and it's worth taking some time to make everything very equal on the left & right sides (shocks (length, rebound, etc) rideheights, droops, etc, etc...)

Other than that, if you've raced offroad in the past, I'm sure you already know to just talk to the 'fast guys' about what tires, motors, gearing, base setups, etc to run.

And most importantly go out there and have fun!!!
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Old 09-01-2002, 06:57 AM
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exactly.....and again, try to find someone with a TC3, and see if they will give you their setup. Most people would be happy to help.
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Old 09-09-2002, 09:59 PM
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Yeah, do something about that antenna wire hangin out the end of your antenna(heat shrink, longer antenna tube, convert to an inside antenna).

Ask around at your track for what tires to run and what setups are good for your car. Tires will be your most major adjustment on getting your car to drive the way you want it too. Next comes setup(springs, oil, toe, roll centers, etc.....) and staying of the walls, pipes, curbs, etc.
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Old 09-10-2002, 10:53 AM
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You're one up on me. I had no R/C experience when I started racing this summer but after 11 races I am in 4th for season points. Tires are the biggest issue and making sure the car isn't tweaked. At first I was out there trying to run the tires off and broke constantly. Now, I just cruise around and win when the other rookies crash. I still can't look ahead very well so I am going too deep into corners but I'm getting better. We race in the parking lot so I don't get very much practice. I envy people who get to race at places like http://www.twincityhobby.com

That looks like a nice track
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Old 09-10-2002, 01:09 PM
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Claydoh, you're right it is a VERY nice track. I race sedan there everyweek. Haven't ran my truck in awhile, but after OctoberFast (October 4-6) I'll probably be doing both on and offroad there.
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Old 09-10-2002, 02:57 PM
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Yes, that is a nice track. I wish I was lucky enough to have something that nice around here. The LHS near me only has a rather small oval track that is set up in the parking lot on Saturdays.

Oh, and proudwinner, why do something about the antenna? I mean as far as I can tell, that's not going to have any effect on my car's performance. Sure I wanted my car body to look good, but other than that I'm more concerned about my cars performance than it's looks. Just curious why that particular thing caught your attention.

Also, as I have been doing some reading of the forums and I've found out that I was definately not ready to get into any races. As I had stated in my original post, I've been into off-road kit building for quite a while, but I've been in and out of the hobby over the years. I had not kept up with battery technology and when I bought my TC3, I bought a new battery pack. I picked up a 1500 NiCad pack. After a few trial runs around a local mall parking lot I realized that that's just not enough. I've got two 3000 NiMH packs on their was as well as a new Integy 16x7 charger (that was recommeded by a few people on this forum in another thread). Now to figure out how to properly charge these NiMH batteries.

Question... what is the benefit to buying cells and building your own battery packs as opposed to buying pre-built packs?
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Old 09-10-2002, 07:14 PM
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Originally posted by bobreck
Oh, and proudwinner, why do something about the antenna? I mean as far as I can tell, that's not going to have any effect on my car's performance. Sure I wanted my car body to look good, but other than that I'm more concerned about my cars performance than it's looks. Just curious why that particular thing caught your attention.
Your absolutely right, a wire like that hanging out isn't gonna get frayed, broke off, scracthed up then break off, etc, etc... Leave it like it is. Glitching is your worst enemy at the track.

Last edited by webspinner; 09-10-2002 at 07:21 PM.
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Old 09-11-2002, 05:35 AM
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I take it you're being sarcastic. Thanks so much. I figured posting in the "Rookie Zone" I would get some real help, not sarcastic responses. My question was a legit one, I am trying to learn stuff about this hobby.

I have never seen, or at least noticed, someone racing at the track near me with anything specially done to their antenna. They're always hanging out like that. So, if there's a legit reason as you seem to imply there is, I will take the advice.

God forbid I ask why.
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Old 09-11-2002, 12:26 PM
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bobreck, Usually what I do with my antennas, is stick them through the tube, then at the top I fold it so the antenna comes back down, put the cap on, and then slide a peice of heat-shrink down the tube and shrink it. The heat shrink holds the antenna wire against the outside of the tube, so it doesn't just dangle and get cut as easily. With the antenna wire hanging out like your's is, I could very easily see it getting ripped off, if you flip the car and it slides up-side-down a little bit, the loose wire might get caught on something and rip.
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Old 09-11-2002, 01:27 PM
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JeffC,

Thanks for your explanation. That's the kind of info us newbies need, or at least I do. I guess I never worried about that because in my off-roading experience, the antenna never really had anything to get caught on or the wire was wound completely around a stiff metal antenna post. Maybe it was just that it wasn't so bad if it hit dirt. I can understand how asphalt could damage it.

I will look at doing something like that. I guess I always assumed that a free hanging antenna wire would allow for better signal reception.

Thanks!
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Old 09-11-2002, 02:21 PM
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as far as the antenna issue, I read somewhere that you don't want to have it heat shrunk up against the tube as it can shorten range and cause glitching issues (I read this from a radio manufacturer). I run an FM radio now, so I haven't had any issues with glitching that I would play around with that.

As for racing. First thing you should do is see if they have a sportsman class and what is required to run in it. Where I race, they have a sportsman class that you have to run the following:

1) no packs above 1500mah, stick assembly, unmatched
2) Street Spec motor, bone stock
3) no ESC over 99 dollars retail (basically no racing escs)

Other than that you can run anything else on the car. Its very competitive (I run the pro class but the guys love the sportsman).

If they don't have that class find out what is the legal items allowed. I would also look into spending some time afterhours running on the track itself and get a feel for how your vehicle handles. Don't make too many initial adjustments to the vehicle at first. Just take notes on how the vehicle feels going around the track. It may take about 3 to 4 races before you feel your vehicle is setup just right, but its worth it to start it at the stock setting and go from there than have some joe blow changing settings on your car to what he likes to run. Everyone is different, what he likes, you may not.

As for your packs and charger, you did a good thing buying the 3000s and the charger. That charger I think is the best for the money for racing, I plan to get it when I have the money As for maintaining your packs, go to www.promatchracing.com and follow the instructions they have there. They also sell packs that are some of the best I have seen, even for the stick packs we have to run in pro (any mah, just unmatched sticks).

If you want to pick up more packs, definitely look into the new GP3300s, really great packs for the money.

Oh, one more thing. Most likely you will break stuff. So I would go to www.brpracing.com and get all the brp parts for the TC3 (ie- front bumper, rear bumper, nerf wings) and get those put on. It will save you the headache of broke arms, carriers, etc. We jury rig the nerf wings to our XXX-S's to protect the rear arms and carriers and they do wonders. With the XXX-S version of the front bumper, I haven't broken a front arm or carrier yet. Really a great investment.

Depending on the kit you got, eventually you may want to get titanium turnbuckles and RPM Ball cups. I would however hold off on the wrap around heat sink as it can cause your motor to overheat since it can cover up the cooling vents that a lot of motors have.

Hmm, can't really think of anything else. I will agree that tires are one of the most important investments, expensive. Unless your tires are just way off, I would try and adjust the car to suit the tires unless they burn up too fast. The Proline tires that come with the TC3 tend to burn up way too fast. I like HPIs X-pattern tires. Great all around tire. When we raced outdoors, the V-groove radial was the hot ticket.


Hope all this helps,


Marco


PS- Any questions feel free to ask and I will try and help, no sarcastic answers either
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Old 09-11-2002, 06:09 PM
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Originally posted by bobreck
Question... what is the benefit to buying cells and building your own battery packs as opposed to buying pre-built packs?
If you want to save yourself alot of hassle just get them built by www.promatchracing.com . I tried the old build our own packs deal and you shell out a fair amount of cash to get started, jig, solder, bars, connectors...... the list goes on. I'd say don't put more pain in your life just get them built it's easier and they look better then if there done by a newbie solderer.

bobreck - Have you been to "The track" at gaithersburg?
http://www.rctrack.com/

Last edited by fatdoggy; 09-11-2002 at 06:14 PM.
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Old 09-11-2002, 06:50 PM
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Cain,

Thanks for all the great information. A very informative post. Thank you. I really like the idea of the nerf wings. I think I will definitely pick them up. Thanks for the suggestion.

FatDoggy,

Thanks for your info on the batteries. I think for now I'll stick to pre-built packs. Also, no, I have never been to "The Track" but I will definately have to make my way there one weekend. I have to check out that site still, but I took a quick glance and it looks great!

Thanks again, both of you.
Bob
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Old 09-30-2002, 07:52 PM
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To Rookies, Building batteries seems hard. Don't worry, ive been their before,the word "Solder" brings horror to your mind. Deans,Racers Edge and a few other companies sell "Building Jigs" That not only squeeze the batteries for you but hold the battery bar on for you so you can easily solder them into place. Its so ez,even I,a expert at the R/C sport use it. Its a very nice tool to have

Onroad racing-Onroad is a totally different animal than offroad. I race both and all I have to say is On-road is harder but I think more fun and challenging. Offroad dosn't require that much as driving skills as onroad does. Offroad just requires that you land jumps right and smooth. Onroad is all about finesse. Slower is faster,but you have to have good equipment to be fast(Unless your in rookie class then your OK) Like a super fast servo is a nedded thing. I used to run the Hi-Tec super torq(Known as hi-tec's Speed servo) and When you fly through the S's the cars is slow due to steering response. But when I put my Airtronics digital servo in their. In my heats I got 1st and 2end because i could go faster with ther servo and I had no delay in the servo.
I don't recommend a Rookie going out and buying a $135.99 servo but just keep in mind that the more you progress,the better stuff you will have to buy. But dont go and fly arond corners (especially if your track it made out of BOARDS) just run at your own pace and you will do fine

Last edited by fireblade; 09-30-2002 at 08:01 PM.
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