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Need some advice...RC kit suggestions for corporate training event

Need some advice...RC kit suggestions for corporate training event

Old 02-25-2013, 08:19 PM
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Default Need some advice...RC kit suggestions for corporate training event

RC newbie and first post to RCT...

Wondering if anybody might be willing to point me in the right direction.

Long story short, I am involved in designing a training event for my company's interns this summer. This year, we have landed on having teams build then race RC cars. I've been poking around the interwebs for a while now and have been impressed (and humbled) with what I have learned so far. I even went as far as building a Tamiya Grasshopper this weekend to see what was involved.

So here's where I could use a few helpful suggestions...

The design of the activity is as follows:
We will have several teams (each with 8-15 ppl per team) each responsible for building one car. Safe to assume that model building experience is limited at best.

We are giving them ~2 hrs to build the car (at least to the point it can drive...there will be time later to fine-tune)

Here's the crux...the assembly has to be relatively straightforward. Granted, they will be working in teams and can split up components amongst the team. That said, the Tamiya kit I built this weekend would be too much, unless some it were to be pre-assembled.

Once these are built, I'd like for at least 4 cars to be able to race at once. I've started to wrap my head around 2.4 ghz radios and I believe I'll be okay if I buy enough transmitters/receivers.

So here's where I need help...

In terms of basic kits, is there something out there that requires less assembly than the Grasshopper I built? Ideally, the major components would already be assembled and the interns could more or less piece everything together (we're even thinking of having some teams them do the build w/out complete instructions...). Apparently this has been done with Radio Shack XMods in the past, but from what I can tell, the current alternative (atomic mods?) seems to require just as much assembly as the Tamiya kit. Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

Secondly, if such a kit doesn't exist, any chance there might be a company out there willing to partially assemble cars?

Lastly (sorry...), any suggestions on what to use to build a temporary course? We're going to be holding the races in a really cool space w/ slick floors, a 360 degree balcony for teams to watch their drivers, and a full production company. Want the course to be impressive (curves, straightaways, maybe even a few jumps)...but haven't thought of what might be best to build and breakdown the course in a matter of a few hours.

Alright...I think I've asked more than my fair share. I sincerely appreciate any and all guidance you have to offer!
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:54 PM
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As far as putting the kits together, I've so far put together about 5 losi 22 kits. Even with having that much experience it takes me just under 4 hours to get one race ready. Now there is a difference between race ready as well as a difference between a group of people assembling a kit. I believe a 2 hour time period would be enough to barely get the car running as long: the kit was split up into the front steering assembly, rear assembly with motor mount and gear box, and suspension. If you had 1 person on each section the front portion might take 20-30 min, the rear would be the same, and the suspension maybe 15 min. This would be assembling as fast as possible without being too stingy on the measurements. The electronics will be pretty easy as long as all of the soldering necessary was done prior to the event. Just some doubly sided sticky tape will be needed. Oh, tires will probably take another 10 minutes.

I think the best car for this situation would be the team associated b4.2. You might even be able to swing a deal by finding some b4.1 world car kits. Anyway, from the kits that I've assembled this is the easiest kit to put together.

In terms of creating a track, we use pvc to lay the main course, then use box jumps and other features to make the track more technical.

For radios, 2.4ghz is the way to go. You won't ever have to search for an open frequency because it does it for you.
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Old 02-26-2013, 01:15 AM
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i think as mentioned by adamym, the key is to break the kit build into manageable parts, so that parts of the kit that can be built without reliance on other parts of the kit are done so. You would have to assess the kit before starting this activity to know what parts are independent builds and then recommending to the groups that these sections should be built concurrent to other sections of the build.

for simplicity's sake , rear diff and shocks would definitely be independent.
But saying that i really believe 2 hours is a fine line depending on the kit.

As far as partially assembled, hobbyking does ARR kits which require just a reciever and transmitter installed and they would be ready to go.

And schumacher do some assembled kits, but the ones i have mentioned pretty much require no assembly and only installation of electronics.
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Old 02-26-2013, 05:57 AM
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Extremely helpful! From the little experience I've gained with my first build...pre-assembling pieces into managable parts sounds like the way to go. Will look into the models recommended here. Thank you.
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Old 02-26-2013, 06:16 AM
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Go here and get a RTR (ready to run) kit.

http://www.amainhobbies.com/advanced...p?keywords=rtr

Comes with everything, some are partly built.
These are cheaper because they dont use heavy duty parts in them but they function the same.
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Old 02-26-2013, 06:29 AM
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I would buy 4 TT-01's and 4 sets of the Tactic 2.4ghz radios.

Done......
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:49 AM
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If your looking for the full experience I would go with the 2wd buggy like I said in my previous post. They have the simplest mechanics and are also the most feasible to assemble in 2 hours with your mentioned plan.

Road cars were mentioned, but most likely they are going to be a cheap ready to run or a kit. These cars are often 4wd which will require more technical capabilities due to the 4wd drive system. Creating the track would be the easiest as the road cars can't and weren't really made to jump.

Ready to run vehicles are actually built with more heavy duty parts so that a typical beginner that's looking to get into the hobby will be more confident in the durability of the vehicle. For example, in a race I've seen a traxxas slash run into a large post in mid air and full speed...twice. The body might of been dented, but the truck was still able to finish the race. Any one of my race vehicles (listed in my signature) would of broken either an a-arm, or something on the front bulk head.

Although, if you wanted to go to an rtr route you would actually end up with a cheaper overall price. For example to assemble a b4.2 kit you would be paying $260.00 for the kit, around $110.00 for a cheap motor and speed control, at least $40 dollars for a decent servo, around $80 dollars for a radio and receiver, and maybe $40-50 dollars for a battery. So roughly about $540 per car. Whereas the RTR vehicle will run as low as 200 dollars for a vehicle that comes with everything to run. These vehicles by no mean have the greatest parts, instead they will most likely have an AM radio (you'll be limited in how many cars you can run at the same time, but since there's only 4 cars you'd be fine), brushed motor, cheap speed control, and a Nimh battery. There are also RTR vehicles that come with a brushless motor and 2.4ghz radio. You can buy the team associated b4.1 as an rtr with brushless motor and 2.4ghz radio for $250. All you would have to do is purchase the batteries for the car and the radio.

If you wanted to go this route you could manually disassemble some of the parts like; the wheels, suspension arms, transmission, steering and servo. This could put you into a nice position in terms of assembly time, but will require your efforts on preparing them before hand.

I hope this helps and gives you some options in what you can do.
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:58 AM
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2WD buggy I don't think would be the right call. They are not very durable and the rear ends ( transmission, ball diff and what not is hard to build when time is a factor )


Tamiya TT-01's are bullet proof for the new drivers, you can ram them into each other, and the plastic is so thick, you are not going to break any of them. They all come with the same 540 motor and esc, and you can through a $9 S3003 servo in them and call it a day.

This is for a corporate training, I doubt anyone is going to want to do this past this team building day.

This is a great and fun idea no doubt, but don't over think it.

ANY ADULT can build a TT-01 in 2 hours.
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:55 AM
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Awesome. This is exactly the guidance I needed. Thank you immensely.

Considering either going w/ RTR and disassembeling some of the components or the TT01. Either sound feasible.
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Old 02-28-2013, 05:00 AM
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Just my viewpoint, but this may not be the best idea.

If you are unfamiliar with RC and the group is unfamiliar with it, there are a lot of unforseen things that can cause problems. Not having someone experienced in RC and not experienced with whatever cars you are building seems problematic in that there is no expert you can go to for help. All of the things we take for granted in RC can come up. Binding receivers to radios, plugging in the servo and esc to the right places in the receiver, centering the steering, reversing channels on a radio, etc etc. If you put the 4 cars down, and one doesn't go, then what? Not to be a pessimist, but a lot can go wrong.

You will not be able to put together a TT01 from scratch without instructions. Doing RTR's partially disassembled would be better. You need to take as many variables out of it as possible. Wiring, gear mesh, setup, etc.

Also, your surface you said is very slick. Chances are you will be using rubber tires. Will those tires marr the floor? Ideally you would want to lay down carpet or something or the cars may be undrivable. What about charging batteries? Painting bodies? If people are driving, do you have thoughts to corner marshalls (someone to turn over upside down cars, etc)? I assume you will be running this, but does that include announcing during the race(s)? How will you track who is in what place (might not be too bad with 4 cars)?

Maybe you have thought of all of these things, but just wanted to warn you there are a lot of things that can go wrong if not planned for in advance. You might even consider trying to bring in some local racers or hobby shop folks to help.
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Old 02-28-2013, 07:49 PM
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I agree with the RTR idea and you just disassemble part of them for the event. I see you are from MA. What part, there is an excellent hobby shop in Fitchburg called RC exicitement and they have indoor onroad and offroad tracks and they are very knowledgeable. Sounds like a fun event, where can we sign up, lol. Hope this helps.
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Old 03-01-2013, 05:26 AM
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If you are running on a flat slick floor forget about 2wd buggies, the new drivers would never get them to go in a straight line never mind around a track. Touring cars might not go over jumps but being smaller versions of real cars they have more appeal to people who aren't into the hobby.

A simple touring car will be easier to drive and as others have recommended the Tamiya TT-01 cars are the easiest to assemble and virtually impossible to put together wrong. Give them a proper sized screwdriver, small side cutters to remove the plastic parts from the sprues and body trimming scissors and they should have no problem assembling them. Any experienced r/c racer should be able to throw one together within an hour, dividing tasks up so one team builds the suspension while another builds the transmission and chassis should mean it shouldn't take them much longer. An alternative would be Tamiya M05 minis, being only front wheel drive they have less components than a TT-01 so even faster to put together. Tamiya kits will need the bodies painted, but the kits include window masks and body stickers so all you need is a can or two of spray paint and can be done as a separate assignment for the part of the team not involved with screwing the chassis together.
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Old 03-01-2013, 11:49 AM
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Even simpler than a tt-01, why not use a RJSpeed Legend. Super easy to build and can be done as a team (one group take the chassis...one group work on the diff/rear axle which will just slid into the finished chassis.

Look at the parts explosion here: http://www.rjspeed.com/rjspeed/2010ex.pdf

Highly durable, low cost, easy to build. Have the bodies painted and trimmed ahead of time. Maybe roll out some carpet for them to run on.
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Old 03-01-2013, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by cdwilliams1
Even simpler than a tt-01, why not use a RJSpeed Legend. Super easy to build and can be done as a team (one group take the chassis...one group work on the diff/rear axle which will just slid into the finished chassis.

Look at the parts explosion here: http://www.rjspeed.com/rjspeed/2010ex.pdf

Highly durable, low cost, easy to build. Have the bodies painted and trimmed ahead of time. Maybe roll out some carpet for them to run on.

TT-01s are a great idea, but I like the idea of a Legends car. Those things are so simple and easy to build it can be done in an hour by one person.
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Old 03-02-2013, 03:15 AM
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i second the Legend cars... i have 2 of them and they are very very simple to build.

just be careful with the diffs... i would even pre assemble the diffs due to finding some filing and sanding required to get to run properly when i build mine.

But i built mine in 2 hours at work (SHHHHH)

Not to mention cheap...

Legend - $100
35A ESC - $40
silver can motor - $20
can of spray paint - $12
flysky 2.4G radio - $35
cheap servo - $12

Batteries may be a bit of an issue.. as they take 4 cell NiMh or 1 cell lipo. (although i believe a normal 6 cell will fit and be much easier).
The 4 cells would be my choice, but hard to come by.. i would buy a normal 7.2V NiMh 6 cell and cut 2 cells off it and resolder.. again do this before the day. This is what i did and it is quite easy to do.

I used cable ties and double sided tape to hold all the electrics in mine..

And for a quick track... combination of old warfie ropes and training cones (i use the low round ones so you could run over them).

Last edited by Stangas; 03-02-2013 at 03:29 AM.
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