Advice

Old 01-06-2013, 12:18 PM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by Tim/Trenton View Post
Thanks to everyone for your imput we got a lot of usefull information we have decided to go with the 1/16 car ....is the best way for us to start??? And what would be the best one to look into
I agree with BigTrol. 1/10th are larger and will be easier to work on. Also, you won't have as many choices on chassis if you go with a mini and they are going to be more difficult to work on because they are small. 1/10th scale would be my suggestion.

I also agree with Bils' point above about the father/son time doing a build and you can't put a price on that. However, if it were me, I would get an RTR to start with for the simplicity and cost. By the time you get a decent quality kit and everything you need to go with it, you will have alot more $$ into it than if you went with an RTR. I would rather spend $250-$350 for a decent RTR than 2x that amount to piece things together myself, make a bunch of trips to the LHS for things I forgot or didn't know I needed and then realize that my son doesn't like the hobby.

As for the building aspect of it, there's no rule that says you can't strip an RTR down all the way to a box of parts and rebuild it together. You can still teach him about gearing, shocks, diffs, caster, camber, etc, etc with an RTR. As I said before, there aren't very many people in this hobby that don't own 2 or more vehicles. If the 2 of you like it and enjoy it, make your second car a kit. I owned a RC10GT RTR and OFNA Ultra LX-1 RTR before I built my first kit, which was a TLR 8ight-B 1.0. The lessons learned from owning the RTR's made building a kit much easier because I was confident in what I was doing and had already wrenched on things enough to fully understand how everything worked.

Originally Posted by Tim/Trenton View Post
Also should we get gas or nitro powered ? How much and how easy is it tomfindmthe fuel for the nitro cars
Most LHS's should carry nitro fuel and prices will run around $25-35/gallon. There are mountains of posts in this forum about electric vs. nitro and it is a debate that will probably never end. I personally love running nitro for the sound and "cool" factor. Some people hate the sound and smell and won't run them. Just depends on what you like. I love hearing those little engines spool up to 35,000 RPM's as they leave a huge smoke cloud when you peg the throttle and pull a 75' long wheelie down the street. For me, the cool factor outweighs the other issues with running nitro.

With nitro, there are more things to learn and some more maintenance. You have to worry about things like air filters, clutch bearings, starting equipment, fuel lines, etc. You don't have any of that on an electric. Then there's engine tuning. Engine tuning scares some people off of nitros, but if you can follow a few simple rules and directions, it's not that hard. But it is one more thing to worry about that electrics don't have. If you are patient and can follow simple directions, there is no reason at all that a nitro can't be your first vehicle. With electrics, you have shorter run-times and have to watch gearing closely so you don't burn up a motor or ESC. Soldering can be an issue as well, particularly if you don't get an RTR. You will have to do some soldering with electrics.

Of the vehicles that i've owned or currently own, i've had the most experience with the Losi 8ight-B. It is the one I learned to race with, and it has taken a beating but is still going strong. The most fun i've had with an RC while not racing is probably a tie between the Savage X 4.6 and the Traxxas Slash 4x4. The easiest to get up and running were the Traxxas Slash and Traxxas Slash 4x4 (both electric RTR's). Out of all of them, my "go-to" vehicle for me to get a quick RC fix has been the Axial Wraith, hands down. Wether it's been plugging in a battery and tooling around my landscaping or spending a few hours in the garage wrenching on something, it's usually the Wraith I go to first.

Whatever direction you decide to go, have fun with your son and enjoy it!!!

Last edited by sdtech58; 01-06-2013 at 01:19 PM.
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Old 01-06-2013, 02:36 PM
  #17  
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Unhappy Nitro vs electric..............

Originally Posted by sdtech58 View Post
I agree with BigTrol. 1/10th are larger and will be easier to work on. Also, you won't have as many choices on chassis if you go with a mini and they are going to be more difficult to work on because they are small. 1/10th scale would be my suggestion.

I also agree with Bils' point above about the father/son time doing a build and you can't put a price on that. However, if it were me, I would get an RTR to start with for the simplicity and cost. By the time you get a decent quality kit and everything you need to go with it, you will have alot more $$ into it than if you went with an RTR. I would rather spend $250-$350 for a decent RTR than 2x that amount to piece things together myself, make a bunch of trips to the LHS for things I forgot or didn't know I needed and then realize that my son doesn't like the hobby.

As for the building aspect of it, there's no rule that says you can't strip an RTR down all the way to a box of parts and rebuild it together. You can still teach him about gearing, shocks, diffs, caster, camber, etc, etc with an RTR. As I said before, there aren't very many people in this hobby that don't own 2 or more vehicles. If the 2 of you like it and enjoy it, make your second car a kit. I owned a RC10GT RTR and OFNA Ultra LX-1 RTR before I built my first kit, which was a TLR 8ight-B 1.0. The lessons learned from owning the RTR's made building a kit much easier because I was confident in what I was doing and had already wrenched on things enough to fully understand how everything worked.



Most LHS's should carry nitro fuel and prices will run around $25-35/gallon. There are mountains of posts in this forum about electric vs. nitro and it is a debate that will probably never end. I personally love running nitro for the sound and "cool" factor. Some people hate the sound and smell and won't run them. Just depends on what you like. I love hearing those little engines spool up to 35,000 RPM's as they leave a huge smoke cloud when you peg the throttle and pull a 75' long wheelie down the street. For me, the cool factor outweighs the other issues with running nitro.

With nitro, there are more things to learn and some more maintenance. You have to worry about things like air filters, clutch bearings, starting equipment, fuel lines, etc. You don't have any of that on an electric. Then there's engine tuning. Engine tuning scares some people off of nitros, but if you can follow a few simple rules and directions, it's not that hard. But it is one more thing to worry about that electrics don't have. If you are patient and can follow simple directions, there is no reason at all that a nitro can't be your first vehicle. With electrics, you have shorter run-times and have to watch gearing closely so you don't burn up a motor or ESC. Soldering can be an issue as well, particularly if you don't get an RTR. You will have to do some soldering with electrics.

Of the vehicles that i've owned or currently own, i've had the most experience with the Losi 8ight-B. It is the one I learned to race with, and it has taken a beating but is still going strong. The most fun i've had with an RC while not racing is probably a tie between the Savage X 4.6 and the Traxxas Slash 4x4. The easiest to get up and running were the Traxxas Slash and Traxxas Slash 4x4 (both electric RTR's). Out of all of them, my "go-to" vehicle for me to get a quick RC fix has been the Axial Wraith, hands down. Wether it's been plugging in a battery and tooling around my landscaping or spending a few hours in the garage wrenching on something, it's usually the Wraith I go to first.

Whatever direction you decide to go, have fun with your son and enjoy it!!!
I'm not sure about your advice on a nitro being a good first choice for a beginning vehicle, keeping them tuned can be a real nightmare for an inexpierienced rc enthusiast, talk about extra time at your local hobby shop. While I agree with you the effects of the nitro is hard to beat for the excitement factor, electric, especialy in the rtr form is pretty fool proof if you run them the way they are set up right out of the box. Besides if your going to participate in any organized racing particularly indoor, nitro wouldn't be allowed.
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:49 PM
  #18  
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I do agree with you. Electric RTR would be the easiest. However, plenty of people have got their start in this hobby with nitro vehicles. If one has the patience (and it will require plenty of it...), nitro is a viable option for a first car.
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