Go Back  R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Rookie Zone
Front one way diff. >

Front one way diff.

Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By Grizzbob

Front one way diff.

Old 07-10-2004, 05:10 AM
  #1  
Registered User
Thread Starter
iTrader: (2)
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: ROAR HAD ME BANNED FROM RC TECH.
Posts: 2,025
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default Front one way diff.

I've tried searching here and googling this but have come up with nothing.

What is a front one way diff?

Is it basically a spooled differential, where both outdrives are locked together?

Thats what I initially thought until I saw two guys at a LHS checking out a used x-ray and one commented that he thought it had a one way in the front; but when I turned one wheel the other counter rotated, so now I'm confused.

Anyone?
Desolas is offline  
Old 07-10-2004, 05:19 PM
  #2  
Tech Regular
iTrader: (9)
 
losixxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: omaha Ne
Posts: 299
Trader Rating: 9 (100%+)
Default a one way

a one way can be located in place of the front diff or on the top shaft on a belt drive car. A one way is used most ofted on large tracks with sweeping turns a one way dosent brake which means that with a front one way wour car brakes like a 2 weel drive car
a one way is not a spool it has a special bering inside the the gear hub you will be able to spin the front tire to the rear with out any other tires moving but if u spin the front tire foward it will turn all of the weels foward
Your best bet is to go to the track that u plan to race at and ask people what they are running a front one way or a front diff!
one ways for people begining can be un controlable on small tracks. If people are running one ways then buy a car that comes with one stock And if they are running a diff buy a car with a diff in the front
this is what i know
losixxx is offline  
Old 07-10-2004, 06:09 PM
  #3  
Super Moderator
iTrader: (2)
 
Grizzbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Sand Springs, OK
Posts: 3,075
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

Essentially correct, a one way diff will lock both front wheels together in straight forward acceleration, but when you enter a corner, it'll allow the outside front wheel to spin free(a little like a diff, but it rolls more freely than a regular diff). But the downside of them is that they disable any front braking action, so if you stab the brakes, only the rears will do anything(which can make car VERY unstable under braking). That's why they're best using when there's PLENTY of grip available, & they do encourage the driver to alter their driving line, to roll through corners more smoothly & stay on throttle more. When it all works right, the car can carry more speed through corners, so in the right hands & conditions, it can be an advantage(but if you hit a lot of things, it could be a deficit, as impacts can make them put a LOT of stress on the drivetrain, it can shred CVD's pretty quickly if you're not careful)....
22kahn likes this.
Grizzbob is offline  
Old 07-10-2004, 06:35 PM
  #4  
Registered User
Thread Starter
iTrader: (2)
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: ROAR HAD ME BANNED FROM RC TECH.
Posts: 2,025
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

Excellent description, thank you. So then with the outside front wheel spinning free, the power is transfered to the inside wheel which in theory would give you the ability to power through it more if you've got the traction, and the car doesn't traction roll.

Cool. I am buying a used car with a one way front diff, I think I'll be buying a ball diff to replace it for the time being since the track I run is very tight and I currently need solid braking, being a newbie. But it'll come in handy in the future.
Desolas is offline  
Old 07-10-2004, 09:32 PM
  #5  
Super Moderator
iTrader: (2)
 
Grizzbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Sand Springs, OK
Posts: 3,075
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

Good idea, that's what I'd reccomend for ANYONE just getting going(I really think one-ways should only be used by the most experienced racers). And even among us old guys(I've been at it for 15 years), there are many of us that just don't like one-ways anymore, they have their advantages, but spools can also offer some of the same strengths without sacrificing the brakes(but a perfect car setup becomes VITAL), & I also like what I tried, by using a regular diff, but osing an oversized bearing inside it to stiffen its action, & then tightened it to behave much like a spool(but when I hit something it can still slip just a bit & protect the drivetrain parts, but to be fast, I still have to set my car up PERFECTLY, & it is VERY hard on front tires, makes them scrub in corners)....
Grizzbob is offline  
Old 07-12-2004, 06:48 PM
  #6  
Tech Initiate
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Waldorf, MD
Posts: 29
Default

Originally posted by Desolas
Excellent description, thank you. So then with the outside front wheel spinning free, the power is transfered to the inside wheel which in theory would give you the ability to power through it more if you've got the traction, and the car doesn't traction roll.

Cool. I am buying a used car with a one way front diff, I think I'll be buying a ball diff to replace it for the time being since the track I run is very tight and I currently need solid braking, being a newbie. But it'll come in handy in the future.

Close, but no cigar....with a one-way differential, your front axle is locked under power and free-wheels off-power. There is no chance of one wheel spinning in this type of set-up.
minigiant is offline  
Old 07-12-2004, 09:01 PM
  #7  
Registered User
Thread Starter
iTrader: (2)
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: ROAR HAD ME BANNED FROM RC TECH.
Posts: 2,025
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

Ah, ok. Got it now, thanks for the clarification.
Desolas is offline  
Old 05-09-2017, 10:05 AM
  #8  
Tech Rookie
 
Spharticus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Roy, Utah
Posts: 17
Default

I put an "Eaton G80 locker" in my 1/1 scale Firebird race car. The Eaton G80 works like a "one way Diff". That style of diff is best for the Front axle of a 4X4 with loose track conditions. (Sand, loamy dirt, mud, etc). On full size 4x4 vehicles, most of them can be put into either 2wd or 4wd. When in 2wd, the front axle is not driven and the diff is free to spin while turning while on pavement. When 4x4 is selected and you step on the gas, it locks the front axel like a spool. If you are on dry/pavement when you go around a turn coasting, everything is cool and the tires can freely spin at different speeds. The problem is when you need to step on the gas to accelerate out of the apex, the diff will lock, and the car will start hopping like a car with a full spool. While I'm new to the RC hobby, and I could be wrong about RC cars acting the same way, but I would assume that "One way diffs" would be best used the same way as real vehicles, which would be on the front axle of a 4x4 vehicle under loose conditions only. Driving my Firebird on the road was not fun.
Spharticus is offline  

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2022 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.