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Servo savers: Onroad yes, offroad no : Why?

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Servo savers: Onroad yes, offroad no : Why?

Old 07-26-2021, 01:16 PM
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Default Servo savers: Onroad yes, offroad no : Why?

So what's the general consensus on the use of servo savers?
I generally don't see them on modern buggies, and yet they're used in on-road.

What's the thinking behind this? Shouldn't off-road be larger impact forces?
Should we be OK running on-road without savers, given a metal gear servo?
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Old 07-26-2021, 02:17 PM
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yes to both
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Old 07-28-2021, 10:16 AM
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Because of the way servo savers work, racers don't want them. So onroad cars and offroad trucks/buggies geared towards racing typically don't have them. The problem is lateral forces caused by high speed corners on a high traction track can overcome the spring in the servo saver and cause inconsistent steering.

That being said, there are still a lot of racing offroad vehicles with servo savers built into the steering rack, especially 1/8 scale.
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Old 07-28-2021, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by GerryH View Post
Because of the way servo savers work, racers don't want them. So onroad cars and offroad trucks/buggies geared towards racing typically don't have them. The problem is lateral forces caused by high speed corners on a high traction track can overcome the spring in the servo saver and cause inconsistent steering.

That being said, there are still a lot of racing offroad vehicles with servo savers built into the steering rack, especially 1/8 scale.
so again what are you saying use them? or what ? if most 1/8 scales offroads vehicle have them built in.clueless.
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Old 07-28-2021, 07:05 PM
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There are ways to so to speak eliminate the saver or minimize it.

The plastic saver bell at least on the 8ight OG-4.0 is a weak point and has to be dremel’d at where the front part of the saver top arm mates on top the saver top as it moves forward and backward on the saver bell. To create a evenly rooted wear pattern a groove has the be made to seat the front of the lip into the plastic or it will round out and stretch the saver bell oblique.
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Old 07-28-2021, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by the rc guy View Post
so again what are you saying use them? or what ? if most 1/8 scales offroads vehicle have them built in.clueless.
Use them.. imo
If a good sustainable design, otherwise if problematic. Find solutions that work. I do recommend savers, or a servo that can take the send-it abuse.. no plug intended.
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Old 07-29-2021, 12:46 PM
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It's real easy. If you want to get the edge no matter the cost, even if means rebuilding / replacing a servo after a minor crash then do not use servo savers. If you hit the boards all the time and / or are not consistent enough to notice the fraction of a second you would gain by not having them (or you bash and not race) then use a servo saver.
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Old 07-29-2021, 02:07 PM
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Originally Posted by mrreet2001 View Post
It's real easy. If you want to get the edge no matter the cost, even if means rebuilding / replacing a servo after a minor crash then do not use servo savers. If you hit the boards all the time and / or are not consistent enough to notice the fraction of a second you would gain by not having them (or you bash and not race) then use a servo saver.
Totally agree.

Just know if one goes solid, aluminum, maxed spring, glued.. make sure the servo can take a jump without issues. Chances are a servo behind a saver needs to be upgraded as well.
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Old 07-29-2021, 02:14 PM
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The plus on the 8ight og-4.0 is there was an aluminum bellcrank setup and with the proper servo the saver can be locked.
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Old 07-30-2021, 08:15 PM
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My thoughts. Excluding 4wd anything asply sct 1/8 buggy and 1/8 truggy. The 2wd rc cars just don't have the traction and weigh to break good quality servo. Not saying enough hits won't still break one but you more likely to break something else(rtr servos excluded). The surface also tends to give away far more then asphalt, cement barriers, cement roads, carpet covered concrete(wood too).

The on road rc cars have less rolling resistance, and often achieve faster speeds then their off-road counterparts coupled with the higher traction and harder surfaces tend to break servos more often. There also a fact that servo saver on the on road cars actually softens up the steering decreasing rollovers At speed on the high traction surfaces.
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Old 07-31-2021, 01:14 AM
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On anything offroad, 4wd 1/10 or bigger I would strongly recommend using one. The forces involved in 1/8 scale are immense and can murder servos no problem at all. So best to setup the saver properly. I don't know why people like to lock them down and run a a servo with ridiculous torque to compensate, to me it looks like asking for trouble.

2wd offroad isn't necessary for savers, too light or if it is a truck, the tyres are too poofy and act as an excellent bumper/saver themselves.

Onroad imo is generally necessary for piece of mind, unless you run mod and are of course talented enough to run at that level.
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Old 07-31-2021, 06:06 AM
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"Onroad yes, offroad no"

Nope, is not true. 1/10 Onroad TC has no saver at all, as a driver you have the choice to use a saver or just a servo lever on the servo.

In most offroad cars (for sure 1/8) there is a saver build in in the steering mechanism. With an adjustable springtension you can adjust is to what ever you want.

But yes, a saver can be disturbing if there is play on it or they are weak.
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