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Stripping old paint

Stripping old paint

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Old 10-31-2014, 12:23 PM
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Default Stripping old paint

Wuz up guys/gal, I'm getting a boat on this site, rtr. I think the first thing am I do is re-do the paint. So I need advice on removing the old paint. And I'm gonna let an auto painter paint it. Does auto paint work on boat hulls? Thanx in a advance.
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Old 10-31-2014, 02:57 PM
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What kind of hull is it and how much paint is on it.
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Old 10-31-2014, 06:19 PM
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It's stock paint(yellowish), proboat,catamaran style, miss geico.
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Old 10-31-2014, 07:30 PM
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Is it plastic/ abs or fiberglass? If there is not a lot of paint I would just sand it to skuff the surface and prime.
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Old 10-31-2014, 07:48 PM
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It's on it's way, don't know what's it made of, probably plastic. Thanx for your info, gonna ask the paint guy too to see how he wants it, thanx.
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Old 10-31-2014, 08:24 PM
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Lots of strippers will eat away at the plastic.
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Old 11-01-2014, 01:56 PM
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Take it to the painter and let him deal with it. If he messes it up then it's his problem. He should know what to use. The problem is that plastic hulls are sensitive to solvents as you could end up with a melted blob. Fiberglass is another story. I've stripped them with solvents and no problems. I used to get 5-finger discounts on ethyl acetate at work and it was some of the best stuff I've ever used. It's definitely one that you'd want to use outdoors though, strong stuff.
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Old 11-01-2014, 01:58 PM
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I'm afraid to see how much you are going to pay for a paint job on a plastic hull. Sand it and rattle can it, that's what I would do.
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Old 11-01-2014, 06:56 PM
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Guy is pretty cool, he said he'll do it for free. Gotta give him something though probably for lunch and dinner,lol. Thanx got the advice.
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Old 11-02-2014, 08:43 AM
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you don't have to strip paint to paint over it. you would only need to scuff the old paint by wet sanding it with 400. old paint in good condition is an acceptable substrate even on autos. so long as it doesn't have problems like peeling etc. bad spots like chips and scratches just need sanded out. sand it down to bare substrate feathering the edge of the paint back far enough you can't feel it. this will depend how thick the old paint is. for example on a real car you would have to go about 2-3" all the way around. prime the bare surface in that spot. spray it a few inches into the painted area. wet sand with 400 grit to smooth the primer and blend it into the painted surface surrounding the area.

always prime bare surfaces of fiberglass, plastics or metals. not 100% sure about wood. but that probably depends on the paint you're using. if it's automotive grade I would say yes or it will never hide the wood surface.
Also, when painting a soft plastic like a car bumper the paint has to have flex agents added to it. urethane paints are best suited for this kind of surfaces.


if he's a painter let him prep the boat. the prep is 90% of how well the paint job turns out. if it's done improperly it's not worth wasting good paint on.

Last edited by mtpocketsracing; 11-02-2014 at 09:03 AM.
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