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Battery Connectors for Lipo

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Battery Connectors for Lipo

Old 02-02-2019, 05:46 AM
  #16  
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Use the correct xt plug for your amps you will need there is no set answer for what xt plug for a 2 cell. I like xt 90 myself..
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Old 02-02-2019, 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by MaX-D View Post
what didn't you like about the ec5 connectors? How do they compare to the XT type connectors? What XT connector is the best to use for 2s lipo?
So here is my take on EC vs XT.
Since I started with Horizon Hobby products, most of my planes/helicopter/cars are EC3 or EC5. I have cut off an uncountable number of XT connectors from Hobbyking batteries.
There is fundamental difference in the construction of the two connectors. With EC connectors, the contact and the housing are separate parts. With XT connectors, the contacts are molded into the plastic.
There are pros and cons to both types. With EC's you solder the contact on to the wires and then you have to snap it in to the housing. The plus side of this is that there is no risk of melting the housing while you solder. The downside is that the snap-in step can be a pain. There must be no solder leakage to the outside of the contact.

With XT, you do not have to deal with the snap-in process but there is some risk of melting the plastic around the contact when you go to solder large gauge wire.

There are various versions of EC connectors around and some are easier to snap-in than others, The ones I get from Hobbyking seem to much easier to snap-in than ones I get from ProgressiveRC.

EC's are basically not reusable while XT's are.

I am not really sure about how they compare in terms of "Pull-apart" force but EC5's take quite a bit of force to get them apart. The chance of one of them coming loose is just about zero. XT may be as good but IDK.

I only have one XT connector in any model and it is an XT30. I used it in a glider where there was little room for the gear and and EC3 was two big. I think I looked at EC2 which is not very common but I went with the XT30. None of that is an issue in the typical RC trucks/cars.

You asked about changing connectors on batteries. Voltagedrop had good advice. You just need to be careful that the leads never touch because you will get a dangerous spark. Never cut the wires at the same time. I go a little further and do one wire at a time from cutting to attaching to the new connector. That way, there are never two exposed leads that can arc.

I think that in the end, XT is probably easier to work with but EC's are very good once you get used to the assembly process. There are some tricks that make it easier. Choosing the right tool to press the contact into the housing takes some experimentation. I usually used a small flat blade screw drive. Progressive sells a special tool at least for EC5. Warming up the contact and the housing (like with an air gun) makes the snap-in process easier and I already mentioned being careful about solder. If you get any on the outside of the contact, you have to sand to file it off. Don't ask me how I know

There are a lot more batteries that come with XT connectors so sometimes I wish I had standardized on XT instead of EC.

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Old 02-02-2019, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by MaX-D View Post
I also want to ditch all of my Deans plugs and go with xt60 or xt90 plugs. Are XT plugs easy to solder? I only Run 2s lipo on my vehicles that I drive. What would you recommend, XT 60 or 90?
They are extremely easy to solder and there's far more solder contact area than on a flat Dean's plug. I'd recommend an XT60 down to 12 gauge wire, which should cover all 1/10 applications. I actually use all XT90, even in 1/10. These are larger connectors but I already had several of them. An XT90 is good down to an 8 gauge wire.
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Old 01-14-2020, 10:24 PM
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Has anyone soldered leads onto a LiPo battery before? is it relatively safe?
I have a 3s tc batt that didn't come with a balance connector (!). Its a problem if I want to keep using the batt... So i ordered a xh 3s balance lead and gonna try to solder them right onto the tabs ... internally. I have a soldering iron with adjustable temperature.
Safe, or stupid?
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Old 01-15-2020, 05:51 AM
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it can be safe as long as you do things correctly....xh I thought that was just a snap on shield?.
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Old 01-15-2020, 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by quantum View Post
Has anyone soldered leads onto a LiPo battery before? is it relatively safe?
I have a 3s tc batt that didn't come with a balance connector (!). Its a problem if I want to keep using the batt... So i ordered a xh 3s balance lead and gonna try to solder them right onto the tabs ... internally. I have a soldering iron with adjustable temperature.
Safe, or stupid?
Cant say I have but Ive built my own NICD/NIMH packs with the old soldered on tabs before. Use a higher heat and work fast to tin the tab. Some flux will help get tin even if your using rosin core solder. These are little 20/22gauge wires for the balance so you shouldn't need alot of heat to make the connection.
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Old 01-15-2020, 12:15 PM
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FYI - not all banana plugs are created equal. This one has a spring section that is separate from the core that gives it the ability to spin around some. This one was open or very high resistance between the spring portion of the 4mm plug and the wire connection. While it makes a physical connection to the solid core it can apparently get fouled with dirt/wear/corrosion and in my case was causing a ridiculously high voltage drop.

Pic 1 - resistance between the wire connection and spring portion of the plug.


Pic 2 - resistance between the wire connection through the end of the core of the plug showing that part is as expected.


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Old 01-15-2020, 07:09 PM
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I've repaired balance leads that have broken off inside the case. Pre-tin the balance leads, you don't need the iron very hot maybe 300-350c. Hotter just seems to melt the insulation. Put flux on the tabs and solder away. The lipos I've worked with seem to use high temperature solder on the tabs, so didn't have to worry about tacking a balance lead onto the tab or main wires and having the mains come desoldered.
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