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Old 12-12-2012, 08:45 PM
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We've been running 12th scale 13.5 blinky side by side with 17.5 boosted on a relatively small carpet track. There's very little difference.
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Old 12-13-2012, 05:43 AM
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thanks for all of the comments the reason i brought this up is i want to grow our 12th scale program but our surface is less than ideal for the class and might detur racers from racing this class.i will run mine and hope others will follow also really looking forward to run this car at tamiya with a 13.5
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Old 12-13-2012, 07:03 AM
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Originally Posted by subaru73
thanks for all of the comments the reason i brought this up is i want to grow our 12th scale program but our surface is less than ideal for the class and might detur racers from racing this class.i will run mine and hope others will follow also really looking forward to run this car at tamiya with a 13.5
A few notes about racing an RM-01 on low grip surfaces

With kit tires, chassis, and all plastic bits, the tendency is to understeer
The car I won the first 12th TCS race with, was 99% out of the box, it was very easy to drive

13.5 is the lowest wind motor allowed, if lap times are quick and consistent
with a 17.5, it may be an option

Using a smaller rotor will take away some torque, as well as a taller rollout

In general, 1s 17.5, or 13.5 don't have a lot of torque to begin with
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Old 12-13-2012, 09:26 AM
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Thank you for a great write up rtypec. I am inspired to focus more on TCS this year.

What are the most popular bodies that you can buy today for GT-1, GT-2, and GT-3? This will be for carpet racing, not asphalt. I have always run my NSX, but looks like I will have to switch, thanks!
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Old 12-13-2012, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by RedBullFiXX
A few notes about racing an RM-01 on low grip surfaces

With kit tires, chassis, and all plastic bits, the tendency is to understeer
The car I won the first 12th TCS race with, was 99% out of the box, it was very easy to drive

13.5 is the lowest wind motor allowed, if lap times are quick and consistent
with a 17.5, it may be an option

Using a smaller rotor will take away some torque, as well as a taller rollout

In general, 1s 17.5, or 13.5 don't have a lot of torque to begin with
Great ideas I had fun racing with you at finals last year I ran the orange jagameiser porche looks like I have some home work to do
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Old 12-13-2012, 07:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Waltrip55
Thank you for a great write up rtypec. I am inspired to focus more on TCS this year.

What are the most popular bodies that you can buy today for GT-1, GT-2, and GT-3? This will be for carpet racing, not asphalt. I have always run my NSX, but looks like I will have to switch, thanks!
Based on Rod's write-up, the 599XX was pretty popular...I know I ran it this summer and it felt really good on the track - I did run the Tamiya after-market wing, instead of the just the spoiler that came with the body - was very happy with it, think i'm gonna stick with it
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Old 12-14-2012, 06:18 AM
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Originally Posted by k_bojar
Based on Rod's write-up, the 599XX was pretty popular...I know I ran it this summer and it felt really good on the track - I did run the Tamiya after-market wing, instead of the just the spoiler that came with the body - was very happy with it, think i'm gonna stick with it
Thanks! I saw that in Rod's write-up, I was just curious because he said the Audi R8 was too aggressive, but maybe it would work on high traction carpet? Either way both bodies look great and can't wait for this season to start
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:08 AM
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In regards to bodies, in the class I was racing, GPX-CL2, we were allowed to run only certain bodies. These were the Toyota 86, Ferrari 599XX, Audi R8, HSV-10, Cusco Impreza, Sumo GT-R, and the Corolla. Since I was limited to the amount of suitcase space, I brought the only body that I had experience with, the R8.

As for which bodies the fast guys in my class were running, it was basically a Ferrari Cup race with the exception of a few HSV-10's and R8s (with the exception of one, the R8 runners were backmarkers lol). I believe the eventual winner and all of the TRF guys used an HSV-10.

The other classes, GPX-TRF and GPX-CL3, had no restrictions on body. Any touring car body was allowed (including the Legacy B4). As I said, the TRF guys used the HSV-10 and GPX-CL3 was mostly filled with NSX bodies. There were only a few Subaru Legacies.

If you're wondering which body to run on carpet, I would ask the local fast guys for their thoughts. I'm not fast


On another note, sorry for the lack of updates. They do take some time but I've been busy with other things and when I find time, I get distracted with other projects. I'll post something tonight.
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by rtypec
In regards to bodies, in the class I was racing, GPX-CL2, we were allowed to run only certain bodies. These were the Toyota 86, Ferrari 599XX, Audi R8, HSV-10, Cusco Impreza, Sumo GT-R, and the Corolla. Since I was limited to the amount of suitcase space, I brought the only body that I had experience with, the R8.

As for which bodies the fast guys in my class were running, it was basically a Ferrari Cup race with the exception of a few HSV-10's and R8s (with the exception of one, the R8 runners were backmarkers lol). I believe the eventual winner and all of the TRF guys used an HSV-10.

The other classes, GPX-TRF and GPX-CL3, had no restrictions on body. Any touring car body was allowed (including the Legacy B4). As I said, the TRF guys used the HSV-10 and GPX-CL3 was mostly filled with NSX bodies. There were only a few Subaru Legacies.

If you're wondering which body to run on carpet, I would ask the local fast guys for their thoughts. I'm not fast


On another note, sorry for the lack of updates. They do take some time but I've been busy with other things and when I find time, I get distracted with other projects. I'll post something tonight.
Thanks for the breakdown and I look forward to your trip update.
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Old 12-14-2012, 05:38 PM
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Default 2012 Tamiya World Championship - Day 5

Day 5
Saturday , November 17, 2012

Woah... What in the wide, wide world of sports is going on here? I'd like to say I woke up at 5:00, but that would assume I had actually slept. I got out of bed, sorted things out, and cruised down stairs for some much needed breakfast.




Brian looking like our team priniciple.




After breakfast, we boarded the bus for Twin Messa where the Tamiya Fair and World Championship are held and will officially begin today.

Hey mister, how fast do these things go? There sure are a lot of drivers here. Is there a race going on or something?




We were guided to the front of the line for our entrance into the exhibition center. It was amazing to see the magnitude of this event with all the people lined up to get in.






When the doors opened, we were greated by all of the Tamiya staff applauding us as we walked down the blue and red carpet towards our pits. The walk was quite poignant.

+ YouTube Video
ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.


A less shakey version (not my video)
+ YouTube Video
ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.



The Tamiya World Championship track with rubber laid down. I hope that groove means traction.






Here's a photo from my pit location...some seriousity going on here.




Tom, from Canada, not so serious. Sampling some of Tamiya's fine fruit-flavored lexan paint.




Once we setup our pits and settled in, we were told to clear the pit area and gather on the front straight for the opening ceremonies where all the cars are lined up and group photos were taken. As part of the ceremonies, speeches were given by various members of the Tamiya staff, as well as the international representative and a Japanese representative. As luck would have it, I was choosen as the international representative and gave a very slurred, and hung over rendition of my speech, which was translated by Tom, who seemed to be quite nervous. I don't blame him, it was like his second week of employment with a new company and here he was infront of everybody, including the president lol. The Japanese representative was a nine year old boy who looked as nervous and confused as ever and didn't quite know what to do with himself...I later found out that this kid was to become Anthony's arch nemisis...much to Anthony's chagrin. After a few more presentations and photographs, we returned to our pits to get ready for our last practice round before qualifiers start.


Practice Session 4
I used the final practice session as an installation run with the freshly rebuilt car and a new setup. I focused on getting a feel for the car and work on getting more of a feel for the track, all in three minutes. With the new parts and settings, my car did something that it hasn't done all weekend so far, it was squeeling tires! I've got traction and the car was predicatable. I wished our practice sessions were longer, I really needed the track time to figure out how to drive. After three minutes, I was a bit off pace. That was understandable since I wasn't really driving that hard because I just wanted to get a feel for things and save the car, without having to do a post-wreck trash'n dash repair job on a "freshy".


Qualifier 1
Qualifying was a time-attack format based on the single fastest lap that we complete during our three minutes on track. After all the cars in a class were run, the times were sorted and we were rewarded points (which, from my understanding, were still being determined) for our finishing order in that round. The two best results from the four rounds will be used calculate and determine the starting order for the Finals.

Since the car felt decent and somewhat consistent during the last practice session, I made no changes to the car for our first qualifier. I simply checked and reset everything to make sure it was good to go. At this point, I believe I'm down on pace more because of my driving, and not setup. By the way, I'm still wrecked from last night.

As my car sat on the grid for our staggered start, I took a deep breath and reminded myself that, for this run, my plan was to start conservatively and then go after baller laps in the final minute. When my car number was called, I rolled off the line and was officially on the clock for the world championships. Traction must have gone up between runs because my car was scrubbing way to much mid-corner speed, and I wasn't even driving hard. From my own experience, when I drive a car that's either down on power, or understeers, I tend to drive super tight lines or dot to dot (wallbanging in my case) in order to compensate...then mistakes happen. I may have had three or four clean laps throughout the entire run with the fastest lap being a 14.626. I drove poorly and my car lost time with understeer. For reference, the fastest qualifier posted a 14.049. Ouch!


Qualifier 2
For the second qualifier, I made no changes to the car but opted to use the Audi R8 instead of the Ferrari that it would provide a little more steering. My justification for this decision was that if it worked, great. If it didn't, atleast I'll be going slow in style. In hindsight, this may have screwed me over since quality track time was paramount and every opportunity to get a good run in mattered. There was no room to take one step forward and two steps back, which happened to be the case with my setups and choice of bodies.

An important thing to mention regarding qualifier/race start procedures is that once our cars were placed on the grid, we were not allowed to move them. There were no warm up laps nor were we allowed to drive up and down the straight to trim our steering. Basically, once the car was placed on the track, it had better be good.

When my number was called I took off from the and as soon as I hit the first corner, followed by the chicane and left hand sweeper leading into the infield, I knew I was in trouble. Over steer everywhere! The track definately had grip and I felt that the tires worked fine, but the body just affected handling so much that whatever mechanical traction the chassis had became a moot point. As I struggled with the car for the first half of the qualifier, the theme song from the Benny Hill show started to play in my head. Additionally, thoughts of how frustrated my performance so far has been, and how embarrasing this must be for not only myself, but for those who wished me the best of luck, started to cross my mind. Fortunately, or unfortunately, driving the car required my undivided attention and I was able stop thinking about it and just hustle it. A big part of racing is your frame of mind. Once the car is on the track, you've got what you've got and nothing will change that fact your stuck out there until your run is completed. You can't stop to fix what's wrong and you can't over analyze things. Just do the best you can and get the most out of what the car will give you. My car was bad, my driving not much better, and I wrung it out for all that it's worth. Afterwards, I was asked if my back was sore because I carried that car lol. Unfortunately, lap times suffered tremendously. Despite going faster with a time of 14.566, the top qualifier pulled off a 14.170.

A YouTube video from qualifier 2 (again not my video)
+ YouTube Video
ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.


My car was infront of the yellow Ferrari during this run. Hmm didn't look as bad as it felt lol.

As soon as I returned to the pits, I took the R8 body off the car, removed the wing, and put it away for good. Afterwards, I inspected the car for any damage or tweak and checked/reset the chassis. Meanwhile, Anthony was struggling with his F104. He was down on power and his car looked like it scrubbed a lot of corner speed. We must have passed below a certain threshold of "hurting" because a gentleman in a red jacket volunteered his assistance to Anthony and carefully inspected every component of his car, addressed any flaws or issues, and provided chassis and motor tuning voodoo. We cannot remember his full name, but it starts with a "T", so we respectfully referred to him as "Red Jacket" since he wore a red jacket the entire weekend. It turns out that he is one of Japan's preeminent motor and chassis tuners and since half the field was using brushless motors, he said that he had plenty of free time to help. I'm certain that Anthony learned a lot from this experience.

Grand masters gracing us with their presence.




Once Mr. T had Anthony's car sorted out, he kindly offered to sprinkle some voodoo on my car. It was amazing to see the goodies that he carried in his square hip-bag tricks. He had a plethora of unlabeled syringes and applicators, some with bent needle tips to get inside of motors or just about any situtation, filled with various fluids that only he knew about. In any event, he said that since we're on carpet, and that cars don't get dirty, he's going to apply a lubricant to my entire car. He took care of universals, bearings, motor, and even the pinion and spur gear to reduce friction. He then turned his attention to the belts and asked why they were so loose. Through our translator, I gave him an explanation on our theories of belt tension and driveline efficiency for a given motor (stock/mod). In general he agreed, but then said that on this track, the straight was at most only fifteen to twenty percent of the layout, that I'm never full speed anywhere else, and that I'm losing midfield acceleration with a loose belt. By running a tight belt, throttle feel would be more responsive and the car would have more snap coming out of corners. After I adjusted my belt tension. Mr. Red Jacket then lubed and massaged the belts with the same fluid used for the other driveline parts. He believed that the oil would work so well that I was instructed not to clean it off or touch it for the rest of the weekend. We asked what this mystery fluid was but never got a straight answer from him. He did hint that it was rendered from animal fat...I'm thinking baby seal. j/k

With that little black magic session completed, he gave my car a final inspection and noted how well it was built, which I felt was a great compliment. However, he noticed that something felt wrong with how the front and rear suspension rebounded after compression, and instructed me to let the TRF guys have a look at the shocks.

After giving him my thanks, I shot over to the TRF table and sat down with Taka and Victor to ask them WTF lol. I had rebuilt the shocks with no rebound the night before. The shocks were verified to be correctly built and that was when Taka noticed the front downtravel was way off. Yesterday, we were chatting about how we measured downtravel and at what points of the suspension we took readings off of. Whoops, I must have been really hung over on that one because I was over 2mm off. I had the right measurement, but from the wrong point.

With the car ready to run for the third qualifier, I packed up all of my unnecessary gear so that I can relax and check out the rest of the fair after my last run of the day.


Qualifier 3
Traction came up big time for the third qualifier and my car felt like it was the best it has been all weekend. The changes made between rounds helped significantly and I was able to get around the track without any drama. About a minute and a half into the qualifier, something clicked, and I finally figured out a rythm for this track. It's hard to explain, but I had an ephimany discovering the right lines as well as lift, turn, and acceleration points to finally go fast. With less than a minute to go, I waited for a gap and really went for a flier...and sure enough parts of my car flew. I caved in the left front of my car and shattered a hub carrier when I cut a corner too tight and nailed the inside wall at the apex of the corner. That sucked, especially with how good the car felt, figuring out the track, and having missed an opportunity to improve. Prior to the partial re-kitting of my car, my fastest lap was a 14.362. Traction was going through the roof for this round and everybody went faster with the top qualifier going off to a different planet and laying down a 13.859. I'm starting to feel like a tourist and Anthony is getting beat by the kid. lol.


Tamiya Fair Exhibits

Although I was a little bummed and somewhat disappointed with my performance so far, I wasn't going to let it drag me down. Since I was already packed, I stuffed my broken car into a box and spent the rest of the day checking out the Tamiya Fair Exhibits and shopping in the onsite Tamiya store.

Unfortunately, I don't have many photos to share of our exhibit walkabout because Anthony took most of the nicer photos with his camera.






This year marks the 30th Anniversary of Tamiya's 4wd Mini and they pulled out all the stops. I'll post more about it later. For now, here's a teaser.




The onsite Tamiya store had everything that you could possibly want as well as lots of limited edition, event only items. All of which carried special reduced pricing, with lots of items carrying crazy buy now pricing. Imagine a 2005 NSX body set for 750 yen...yeah, that crazy. As much as I wanted to go nuts and buy everything, I was limited by my suitcase space and that seriously put a damper on my wallet going super nova in my back pocket. There were all kinds of noteworth items that were so popular, they were gone before you could blink. For example, gray with blue edged TRF setting boards for 1800 yen. Not the acrlyic or metal ones, but the boards made out of wood. We had no chance getting any of those. Ferrari F60 front and rear wings molded in white plastic were somewhat a hot item. Brian grabbed a couple and I wished he'd purchased more because they would be great to have. Perhaps Mr. Brian can talk to the powers that be to bring some in? Anthony scored a 1/12 Ferrari model for 190,000 yen. Apparently this price was so good that one of our translators bought two of them.

The Tamiya store before it closed for the evening.






Here's an interesting tid bit, when the clock hit 5:00pm, the song "Auld Lang Syne" was played on the sound system for closing time. I heard that it's not an uncommon practice here in Japan. Neato burrito!

Laying Low

Speaking of food, once we got back to the Century and dropped our junk off, we cruised downstairs to the hotel's restaurant, "La Fleur", and did some serious buffet damage. Afterwards, we wrenched on our cars for a bit. Nothing major, just replacing broken parts. Knowing that tomorrow is going to be a long and crazy day, we decided to chill, relax, and lay low for tonight. We went up stairs for a few drinks and I passed out early for my first night of solid sleep since arriving in Japan.


Last edited by rtypec; 12-15-2012 at 07:52 AM.
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Old 12-17-2012, 10:41 AM
  #17576  
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oh the suspense!..and Tamiya still hasn't posted anything!!!
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Old 12-17-2012, 10:59 AM
  #17577  
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Hi

What is the schedule for the Tamiya track during the holiday season?
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Old 12-18-2012, 07:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Yellowtaro
Hi

What is the schedule for the Tamiya track during the holiday season?
Good question...I'm assuming it'll be open on Saturdays. Are there going to be any extra play days?
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Old 12-18-2012, 07:26 PM
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Default 2012 Tamiya World Championship - Day 6

Warning...here comes a wall of text-o

Day 6
Sunday, November 18, 2012

At 4:00 I woke from my first night of unbroken sleep. After staring at the ceiling for about half an hour, I finally I got up, drank a couple of Red Bulls (I heard they were weaker here), snacked on left-over cake, sorted my gear out, reviewed my qualifying efforts, and thought about how I can improve my position by running through different scenarios. Unfortunately, I'm qualified somewhere in the upper half of the B-main and would need to TQ the last qualifying round in order to be somewhere near the front half of the A-main grid. From there, I'd have a shot at winning or getting a podium. I'll try my best but am also realistic with where I stand as far as pace is concerned. The worse I can do and still make the main was fourth, and that'd put me near the rear of the field. That's more reasonable. If I can't get the result that I needed, it's no big deal since I can be a tourist and check things out. We've been having such a great time so far, that win or loose, we're making the most of the trip.

After our breakfast buffet, we got in the bus, and took off to Twin Messe for the last day of the Tamiya World Championships. Once there, we were welcomed with another red carpet entrance. No matter how many times I've experienced it, it is always special to be greeted that way. When we got to our pits, we setup our stuff and prepared our cars for the final qualifier. This will officially determine our racer status.


Qualifier 4
With no changes made to my car from the previous qualifier, I knew what to expect out of the car and simply had to focus on driving it. Before my heat, I mentally drove laps with my controller in hand and imagined how my car behaved on the last run to not only build muscle memory, but also as a little warm-up, since we were not allowed any practice laps. I approached the final qualifier with the mind set of going all out from the drop of the green flag. I wasn't going to start conservatively and build pace. I was going to drive strapped and way over my head from the word go!

When the race announcer called my number, I punched it. No easing into this one. I threw the car into the first corner and stayed on throttle through the chicane, until I had to lift for the small left sweeper heading into the infield. Despite how much I had struggled with the right side of the track, the way the car behaved during that qualifying start gave me a good indication of what to expect for the rest of the track. The car was dialed! I could go into a corner at full throttle and just lift at the very last moment while turning in. The car felt that it instantly took a set and just turned...with traction, while carrying decent corner speed. I was even able to get back on throttle right at, or even before, the corner's apex. The car was so consistent and well behaved that I was even able to double and even triple steer to avoid small bobbles while running super tight lines. Moments when the car feels like this are awesome and I was stoked to have experienced it on this track. Too bad it wasn't like this yesterday. Apparently, I was so focused on going fast, my fingers started to tingle and go numb, what a rush. Unfortunately, I made a couple of mistakes and used those opportunites to pull off the driving line to take a breath and wait for gaps in traffic.

During one of my little breaks, I took a look at the scoreboard and saw that I had less than a minute left, enough time for maybe three more laps. Knowing that this may be my last chance for a respectable finish, I set out for a lap of the gods. After managing a couple of "clean" laps (well, as clean as I could make them for how strapped as I was driving), I had one lap left. On my final lap, I dangerously skimmed walls and knicked dots, until I ran out of talent and nailed an inside wall that sent my car into the opposite wall. Ouch, party foul. I limped the crumpled mess over the finish line with the Ferrari body's right side caved in and tucked as well as both front tires dangling off the sides. As the say, "Win it or bin it." I was disappointed with how the run ended, but was satisfied that I did my best.

Looking at the scoreboard, my car number was displayed as third. One of our translators, who was on the driver's stand with me, congratulated me on a good run with a fast lap of 14.189. After I picking up what was left of my car and dropping it off in post-tech, I had to turn marshal the next heat of my class. As their qualifier went off, I paid more attention to the scoreboard than I did with the cars on track. Luckily for me, we turn marshalled parts of the track marked with the corresponding number on our race bib. Since I was number one, I had to turn marshal the straight all weekend long...and who crashes on the straight? Back to watching the scorebo...err marshalling, as the qualifier went on, I was expecting these drivers to go faster than me, but as the elapsed time went from one minute to two, then finally expiring at the three minute mark, I was pleasantly suprised that only two of drivers in this heat went faster than I did. The fastest lap in this qualifier was a 13.975.

When I was finished watching the scoreboard, I collected my car and went back to the pits to do some repair work. Since I didn't know if my results were good enough for the A-main and was unsure of which scheduled time slot I had to prepare my car for, I thrashed a little to replace the broken front hub carriers and inspect the rest of my car for other bent, broken, or otherwise misaligned parts. Working quickly, I got the car torn down and back in one piece with setup complete before the last qualifying heat was completed. Now, all I had to do was sit around and wait for the race officials to calculate points and announce the qualifying results.

After a short break, one of our translators came to our pit area and informed us of our our grid position. When I was congratulated for my eleventh place qualifying effort, I asked how many cars were in the A-main. Their reply was that only ten were being run in each main and I missed it by one qualifying point, which was only separated by 0.003 in my second qualifer or 0.056 from my forth qualifer. Whoops, it's BQ for me, a day late and a seventy-seven yen short. I am now officially a tourist I wasn't alone, since Anthony, who was soundly beat by the kid, was also in the B-main. Since we rushed to prepare our cars in case we did make the A-mains, we had plenty of time to kill and enjoy ourselves. I packed up all of my unnecessary gear and went on a walkabout with Anthony. A few minutes prior to our scheduled start time of the B-main final, we walked back to the pits, grabbed our cars, headed over to pre-tech, and got them inspected for our final race in the Tamiya B-Main World Championships


B-Main Final
Sitting at or near the front of the starting grid is something I'm used to...unfortunately, this was the B-Main lol. When the tone went off, I hit the throttle and focused on getting through the right side of the track as quickly and as cleanly as possible. Meanwhile, the rest of the field bunched up into a gaggle and fought for positions, which gave me a cushion immediately. I drove relatively easy and just maintained a gap between second place and myself. Perhaps I didn't pay enough attention to my own driving because I was making small mistakes everywhere, like running wide into the gray stuff and generally blowing racing lines. However, nobody was really catching up...that is, until I clipped a wall in the esses and went for a tumble. This allowed second place to get caught up in my junk and on my rear bumper once I recovered. For a moment, I was pretty happy to be actually racing somebody for position. Unfortunately, it lasted only a couple laps because he rolled his car heading into the infield. Oh well, I went back into circulating mode. I may have gotten a bit too complacent and really wacked the esses again, this time allowing the second place car to get by. Once he was past, I followed as closely as possible, trying to force the driver into a mistake and be in position to overtake the moment I saw an opportunity. That never happened. After a lap or so, the right side of the track really bite me as I slammed my car into the left inside wall after the straight. As my car bounced off the wall and onto the dots, I knew that something broke and confirmed it once I got going again by driving straight onto some more dots and going for a roll. Game over. Insert hub carrier to continue? Not only was I a tourist, I was now a spectator in my own race. Awesome! It was a bit disappointing because these mistakes were all on me. Oh well, that's racing.

Four hub carriers in three runs My car typically came off the track looking like this...



The following link is a previously recorded UStream video of our B-Main races. My race started at the thirty minute mark. Anthony's main is right after mine. UStream Video: [Part5] 2021 Tamiya World Championship B-Main, Final


After turn marshalling Anthony's race, I collected my car from post-tech, removed the body, boxed up the chassis, walked over to the spectator area, and gave the Ferrari body to an unsuspecting little kid as a gift. As soon as Anthony returned from his race, he packed up, and we both went on another walkabout to enjoy the fair before we had to return for the awards and closing ceremonies.
















Tamiya Baking Decorations. They looked yummy, too bad they weren't edible

















B-Main Bummer



Once the ceremonies were finished, we got in the bus, and returned to the Century hotel, where we had a couple of hours to burn before heading out for dinner. I used this time to pack my luggage and get a little rest prior to tonight's inevitable shenanigans.

Before we met the other drivers and Tamiya staff downstairs for our walk to the restaurant, we had a few drinks to get warmed up. It was a chilly night and we couldn't have dinner on an empty stomach lol.


Dinner Party...
As a group we walked for a bit, winding up at the the same restaurant that we've been to almost ten years ago. It's cool that Tamiya uses this place annually, kind of like a tradition. Even though we were thirsty once we were seated, we could not drink until everybody had a beverage in hand. After a speech from the Tamiya staff, we all toasted with a Kanpai and downed our drinks. Although it was a dinner party, I don't remember having any dinner...just lots of beer and tasty appetizers. Eric, one of our translators, got up and showed everyone a magic trick. He made a large bottle of beer disappear, quickly. Since Tom (our other translator)and Victor (Taka wasn't there yet)have been so helpful to me, I ordered them a round of four-horsemen as a token of my gratitude. For those who don't know what a four-horseman is, it's a cocktail containing equal parts Jack, Jim, Johnny, and Jose. Basically, it's a joke drink that's not supposed to taste any good lol. Unfortunately, the bartender couldn't find one of the ingredients, so we substituted the missing part with vodka, yuck lol. Needless to say, that was one fearsome concoction. We had a great time relaxing and enjoying the evening as one large group. As I was chilling with a nice mellow buzz level of about 3 to 4, I was informed that the bartender found the missing ingredient for a correct 4H. And like a dummy, I went ahead ordered another round for Tom and myself, telling him that this is how a proper 4H should taste...like it makes any difference lol. Whoooweee! A follow up glass of beer couldn't chase away that nastiness. Immediately after I put that glass down, one of the AsiaCup drivers, not wanting to be out done by our translator's magic show, wanted me to share a toast with him and down a full bottle in one. Empty handed, I looked at the bar and couldn't find a full bottle. However, and much to my demise, another 4H had already been prepared by the bartender. We exchanged toasts, waved goodbye, he downed his bottle, and I gulped down the fury. Sayonara!








After a short couple of hours, the dinner party ended and was broken up. Seeing as it was still early, we decided to split off from the main group, get our Jar Jar stagger on, and hop over to another bar. I don't remember the name of the place we ended up at, but was often referred to as "the college bar." We shared a pitcher, hung out, chummed the waters by sending drinks to skirts and boots. At this point, the shots from dinner started to hit, big time. As a preventive measure, the guys ordered a pitcher of water for me to drink. So instead of drinking beer to get buzzed, I drank water to bring me back from from the brink and maintain my buzz

How's this for serendipty. We bumped into the original owner of Our Boozer!




Ironically enough, some girls that we didn't send drinks to, invited us over to their table to join their little party. After drinking a bunch of water and getting fried chicken in my system, I was good to go with more beer. They were a riot and we had a great time with lots of fun. I might have peed in a sink.




And that's how we spent our last night in Shizuoka.

Thanks for reading. I'll try to post our Monday in Tokyo later this week.
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Last edited by rtypec; 12-27-2012 at 08:58 AM.
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Old 12-19-2012, 07:30 AM
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nice write up, Rod...

Is it me, or is the last photo blurry I know I haven't been drinking yet today
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