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Power station instead of Generator for RC racing

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Power station instead of Generator for RC racing

Old 10-11-2023, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by gigaplex
The charge rate shouldn't matter much, it'll use about the same amount of capacity.
The higher the charge rate the faster you deplete the capacity
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Old 10-11-2023, 03:15 PM
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Originally Posted by jiml
The higher the charge rate the faster you deplete the capacity
The battery you're charging won't change its capacity just because you're charging it faster. Capacity is amp-hours. Charging at a faster rate has higher amps and is complete in less hours. Total capacity used is unchanged.
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Old 10-12-2023, 12:39 AM
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Just trying to understand regarding charging lead acid batteries/car batteries. Ive seen a some people mentioning about needing "inverters and cables and charger" to charge these batteries. Dont most of the RC chargers we use now all capable of charging all sorts of different chemistry including lead acid batteries? Why is there a need to buy extra "inverters and chargers? Im sure all of us either have a AC/DC charger, or a DC power supply to power the charger. Are dedicated car batteries that much better/safer?

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Old 10-12-2023, 04:46 AM
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Originally Posted by disaster999
Just trying to understand regarding charging lead acid batteries/car batteries. Ive seen a some people mentioning about needing "inverters and cables and charger" to charge these batteries. Dont most of the RC chargers we use now all capable of charging all sorts of different chemistry including lead acid batteries? Why is there a need to buy extra "inverters and chargers? Im sure all of us either have a AC/DC charger, or a DC power supply to power the charger. Are dedicated car batteries that much better/safer?
A large number of RC chargers can do lead acid. I've not seen anyone mention needing an inverter to charge the lead acid, but I've seen people say you need an inverter to generate AC power off the battery when using it. I guess some people use AC powered chargers/devices in their pit?
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Old 10-12-2023, 06:07 AM
  #35  
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Inverter as in a power supply, most RC chargers do need them.
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Old 10-12-2023, 07:10 AM
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I only run DC powered RC chargers. Is there any charger out there worth owning that isn't a Junsi Duo? My Hyperion and Turnigy chargers are used for off road club racing that's too dirty for my nice charger.

Many RC chargers can charge a "lead acid field battery". But that's code for those little batteries used in airplane nitro starter boxes.

RC chargers often fail, charging real truck batteries. A simple 6a charger is cheap. Besides, I'm using my RC charger to charge cars and airplanes. The extra charger keeps my field battery fresh if power is available, at the same time.
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Old 10-12-2023, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Zerodefect
I only run DC powered RC chargers. Is there any charger out there worth owning that isn't a Junsi Duo? My Hyperion and Turnigy chargers are used for off road club racing that's too dirty for my nice charger.

Many RC chargers can charge a "lead acid field battery". But that's code for those little batteries used in airplane nitro starter boxes.

RC chargers often fail, charging real truck batteries. A simple 6a charger is cheap. Besides, I'm using my RC charger to charge cars and airplanes. The extra charger keeps my field battery fresh if power is available, at the same time.
All chargers using a LiPo setting charge with the so called CC/CV method, the only difference will be with the balance current which basically is no issue which one you have.

Lead acid is a common name for lead batteries and so not only for the small ones. With that setting you can charge any car/truck battery. But yes, A simple cheap charger from the hardware store will work fine.
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Old 10-12-2023, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by gigaplex
The battery you're charging won't change its capacity just because you're charging it faster. Capacity is amp-hours. Charging at a faster rate has higher amps and is complete in less hours. Total capacity used is unchanged.
Correct. But charging at 20 amps will use up the capacity faster than charging at 10 amps.

None of this bothers me. I have a 90 amp/hour AGM battery designed for UPS' I can charge at 30 amps all day long with no issues
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Old 10-12-2023, 03:10 PM
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Originally Posted by jiml
Correct. But charging at 20 amps will use up the capacity faster than charging at 10 amps.
Can you explain in depth why?

Because chargers are using a kind of switching power supply the best way is to talk in watt-hour. What you charge in watt-hour you also have taken from the supplier. Higher current results in a shorter time! still resulting the same watt-hour. Yest, the charger will have some losses that can be a tiny different between a low and a high charging current but hardly noticeable.
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Old 10-12-2023, 03:21 PM
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Yes, 20A will use up capacity faster than 10A. Twice as fast, to be exact. But it will both end on the same capacity level again.
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Old 10-13-2023, 06:01 AM
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Originally Posted by jiml
Correct. But charging at 20 amps will use up the capacity faster than charging at 10 amps.

None of this bothers me. I have a 90 amp/hour AGM battery designed for UPS' I can charge at 30 amps all day long with no issues
It'll use the same amount of capacity but do it quicker. Think of it like a gas station filling your car tank. Pumping at 10 litres per second will be quicker than 1 litre per second but the tank won't be any bigger so you'll just be pumping for a shorter amount of time.

Also it's amp hour (amps times hours), not amp/hour (amps divided by hours).
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Old 10-13-2023, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Roelof
Can you explain in depth why?

Because chargers are using a kind of switching power supply the best way is to talk in watt-hour. What you charge in watt-hour you also have taken from the supplier. Higher current results in a shorter time! still resulting the same watt-hour. Yest, the charger will have some losses that can be a tiny different between a low and a high charging current but hardly noticeable.
Batteries measure capacity in amp-hours (someone from the algebra police busted me) so a 10 amp-hour battery will supply 10 amps for 1 hour, or 1 amp for 10 hours, or 2 amps for 5 hours.

Watts are a measurement of power. Electrical power is volts times amps. And watt-hours is power times time. So if you're using more current, you have to use less voltage to have the same power. If you're charging a battery and increase the current, the voltage remains the same, so you will use up the capacity in less time.

That help?
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Old 10-13-2023, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by jiml
Batteries measure capacity in amp-hours (someone from the algebra police busted me) so a 10 amp-hour battery will supply 10 amps for 1 hour, or 1 amp for 10 hours, or 2 amps for 5 hours.

Watts are a measurement of power. Electrical power is volts times amps. And watt-hours is power times time. So if you're using more current, you have to use less voltage to have the same power. If you're charging a battery and increase the current, the voltage remains the same, so you will use up the capacity in less time.

That help?
Except a battery won't change the voltage which it supplies. I think you are mixing up a few things here. While you can certainly use watt hours as a unit here as well, in the case of a battery, with a (for this purpose) fixed voltage, it's easier to just use amp hours - but regardless, the result will be the same. It doesn't matter if you draw 20A for 30 minutes or 10A for 60 minutes. You use up the same amount of "juice" both times, because you do double the load for only half the time. 2x0.5 is still 1.
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Old 10-13-2023, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by jiml
Batteries measure capacity in amp-hours (someone from the algebra police busted me) so a 10 amp-hour battery will supply 10 amps for 1 hour, or 1 amp for 10 hours, or 2 amps for 5 hours.

Watts are a measurement of power. Electrical power is volts times amps. And watt-hours is power times time. So if you're using more current, you have to use less voltage to have the same power. If you're charging a battery and increase the current, the voltage remains the same, so you will use up the capacity in less time.

That help?
But you're not just going to turn it on and let it run all day. Charging at 10A your battery might be charged in half an hour, and at 1A it'll be charged in 5 hours. You'll still get the same number of race packs charged off the lead acid battery regardless of the charge rate.
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Old 10-14-2023, 08:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Roelof
All chargers using a LiPo setting charge with the so called CC/CV method, the only difference will be with the balance current which basically is no issue which one you have.

Lead acid is a common name for lead batteries and so not only for the small ones. With that setting you can charge any car/truck battery. But yes, A simple cheap charger from the hardware store will work fine.

We've nuked a few Rc chargers trying to charge real car batteries. Could be a program issue, but I think that the engineers that designed olde RC chargers didn't take lead acid use seriously.

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