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RC Cornering Technique

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RC Cornering Technique

Old 06-07-2020, 09:56 AM
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Default RC Cornering Technique

I plan on creating videos with specific and concrete advice for RC drivers. Here is my first video:

If you have ideas for other videos, let me know.
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Old 06-07-2020, 08:21 PM
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Very cool. Ive looked into this a little in the past and it helps to understand things. what I noted over my research is a few things. Cornering is the best place to improve your time. some corners are more important than others so it helps to prioritize corners in terms of importance. the themes to apply to the ranking is starts with a little math and a little common sense. if you come out of a corner faster the improvement grows during acceleration because you start with a higher speed and end with a higher speed (this is number 1). number two is retaining more speed through a corner and this comes from smooth late braking. 3rd priority corners on corners that lead directly into another corner.

you want to be on the edge of traction which means acceleration should cause you to use the whole track on exit. FWD, AWD, and RWD have different properties of traction for a corner. FWD gravitates towards rotating the car late in the apex and AWD is similar depending on the traction bias. RWD does better with early to mid apex and getting the car to rotate earlier.

Im not an expert either just spouting off some stuff that makes sense in hopes that its helpful or someone can refine our understanding. I never fully understood what rotating the car was and it seems obvious now. The rear is going to skid a little at the apex if you are pushing the car. Not drifting but not too far off from it.

if the idea is to get max traction out of all tires in a corner then depending on the chassis and whether you are accelerating or braking you want to maximize rear grip or front grip for the exit first, and entrance second while rotating quickly but not so quickly you spin or go wide mid corner.
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Old 06-08-2020, 10:01 AM
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Good stuff Scott, I can't wait to come back up to Bolivar to run with you guys again, thanks for sharing, and I look forward to seeing more analysis like this!
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Old 06-09-2020, 09:55 AM
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Bry195 I agree that cornering is the best place to improve your time. I had not thought of the priorities that you listed, but that makes sense. Is that something that you read somewhere?
I'd like to possibly do a follow up video explaining grip vs slip (and the traction circle). Hopefully I can get back to the track and take some video.

billdelong Good to hear from you!
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Old 06-09-2020, 11:01 AM
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I would like to see some videos concerning how to become a better racer, not go faster.

Too often in this hobby we focus on how to setup our cars better or turn faster laps times. But who teaches us how to race properly to maximize each run on the track. The nature of qualifying in this hobby can often lead to the fast guys EXPECTING the slower guys to get out of their way. Of course it is good race etiquette to not impede the faster drivers or better cars. What isn't fun for anyone is if less experiences racers are weaving out of the way and the fast guys are being overly aggressive on the track or stand.

If you watch the top levels of racing in this hobby, those drivers are very good at what they do when racing against an equal skill set. But have you ever taken the time to watch the best drivers race or practice against the least experienced in this hobby? Usually the best in this hobby have been racing long enough to handle adverse conditions. But just because you are fast doesn't mean you know how to race. I can't count how many times that I've seen "fast" guys who have no racing patience, don't know how to setup a pass against a car that is slightly slower than them, or aren't able to put themselves in a good position to get around an erratic or novice driver.

Learning proper racing techniques and driving lines WILL improve anyone's laps times. But knowing how to pass or be passed in traffic can often make the difference between a better qualifying run and a broken vehicle. We can't always have the best car, best setup, or take the best line through each turn, but we can always maximize each run on the track by not being involved in any self-inflicted accidents.

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I forgot to add...Thanks for taking the time to make/share your videos.
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Old 06-09-2020, 11:23 AM
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Since this thread was created with the title RC Cornering Technique, let me add to my previous post.

A video or partial segment about the following techniques:
- Late brake passing & how to cleanly use your car's position to alter how the other driver attempts the corner
- Altering your racing line to optimize your speed for the next corner/passing attempt
- How to alter your own racing line through a corner when closely following another car & how to take advantage of the other driver's mistakes

If you watch big rc events in person you will often see close battles between equal cars. Often some of the best racing and/or passing is occurring further back in the field. But often when you watch online videos, the main focus is on the leaders. Again it would be nice to see videos that highlight the techniques of good racing/passing vs focusing on the racer with the fastest laps on a clean track.
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Old 06-09-2020, 11:27 AM
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Pass Blocking FTW!


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Old 06-09-2020, 12:55 PM
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Below is a video i found on YouTube where Indycar drivers are discussing late braking with some examples of what to do and not to do. However, in r/c we can get away with a little more side by side rubbing and both cars can come out unscathed. I think you could find some good examples of aggressive late corner entry braking in r/c racing that are also fair to the driver on the outside.

Knowing how to survive side to side contact or contact in R/C in general could be a video of its own.

If you watch at around 5:35 in the video you can see a bad late braking pass attempt.

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Old 06-09-2020, 09:08 PM
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Originally Posted by heyscottn View Post
Bry195 I agree that cornering is the best place to improve your time. I had not thought of the priorities that you listed, but that makes sense. Is that something that you read somewhere?
I'd like to possibly do a follow up video explaining grip vs slip (and the traction circle). Hopefully I can get back to the track and take some video.

billdelong Good to hear from you!
driver61 on your favorite video website. Hes an english driving coach. safer is faster is another company (honda I think) for physics of traction. the stuff i described about traction for different chassis types was a traction comparison from motor trend or some magazine from the same video source.

NASA racing has a race rule publication that is very good about understanding the right of way to be courteous but intentional and not being a bully or being bullied. it would be great if someone took these publications and modified them for RC. I dont think much would have to change.

I think step 1 is learning to control traction. front versus rear on power or off. whether it applies to safe driving or cornering. Now that I have the basic concepts of traction I can focus on fast in or out or on power or off. I didnt know what I didnt know and wasted probably a year adjusting my setup and trying to get the car stable and fast at the same time. the guys i race with helped allot. I drove someone else’s setup. and then another and another and its hard to learn from that when you go from track to track. I have a unique car in that its difficult to get it pushy. well i eventually drove a car that had the right amount of push in the front and traction in the rear and a lightbulb went off. then I knew what a good setup felt like and I started learning things to get my car to repeat that. I still have one chassis giving me heartburn but the two that I figured out how to control the push on power and off slowed thing down enough for me to start getting faster.
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Last edited by Bry195; 06-09-2020 at 09:26 PM.
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Old 06-14-2020, 06:49 PM
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Inside every corner is usually a safe bet.
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Old 06-22-2020, 08:40 PM
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I guess I could have summarized a little better. there is a geometric apex to every corner. its the centerpoint of the arc. The ideal race line allows you to carry as much speed and accelerate out of a corner harder. drifting wide on exit is an example of a car accelerating out of a corner on the edge. it can be done in rwd or fwd or awd. however rwd has more traction on acceleration than fwd if you are turning because the tires arent doing double duty. So late apexing on AWD looks like you are boxing the corner off because you have more grip to turn late. its not the be all end all. Verstappen drives a little different. he will push right up to the edge of a corner and then do a sharp turn (rwd) at the last second. the idea of this is that the car spends very little time on the edge of traction to minimize something going wrong. Anyways, what I have found is that you just need to learn how to be right on the edge for as little time as possible.
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