Exhaust Coolers....

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Old 11-15-2011, 06:19 PM
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Yeah really. None of what you refer to has any present practical application. The 2004 f-1 experiment is not in use. The fact that full scale car parts manufacturers offer gizmos does not mean they are effective or in use in the any of the sanctioned events i.e. by the pros who's careers depend on winning. And, the guy that posted the test results had cooled the fuel to 0 degrees C which, cannot be done with a radiator in hot weather. Also, the test results show an increase in power commensurate with what you would expect from cooling the air and is way beyond the best projections the f-1 team even claimed. This leads me to believe they realized that cooling fuel in an attempt to cool the air around it was an inefficient approach. I suggest if you really want more power, buy a better motor.
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Old 11-15-2011, 07:10 PM
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Old 11-15-2011, 10:40 PM
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It is an EXHAUST COOLER not a FUEL COOLER if that was the case it would be between the tank and the engine like an aluminum filter is. I don't look at getting more run time but the cooler the exhaust is going to the tank not only doesn't heat up the fuel but seems to help with my engines keeping the tune. I ran without it for 10 practices and then just decided to try it out and the benefits are the tune stays way more consistant, runtime per tank went up and I have less problems overall with my engine. Others can disagree all they want but I have seen the benefits for myself of running an exhaust cooler on my buggy and my truggy. I spend less time trying to get my engine tuned through the course of a day of racing or practice and more time on the track where my vehicles should be.

And the exhaust cooler should be warm to hot through running as it's designed as a heatsink to take heat away from the air being pushed through it, instead check the fuel tubing temp before the exhaust cooler and then compare it to the tempurature of the fuel tubing after the exhaust cooler to the tank and then see if there is a difference. I found out that it is over 30 degrees lower after the cooler. Is the head on your engine hot right after you run it, yes it is because it is a heatsink disippating the heat from the rest of your engine check the heat at the glow plug and then check the heat of the head itself and see if there is a difference.

If you don't think it works for you don't use it and if it does work keep using it. I have replaced more fuel tubing on the clunk in my tanks than I have on the fuel tubing that goes from my exhaust pipe to exhaust cooler than to my tank but since I've put them on I haven't yet to replace them and have replaced the ones on my clunks twice each already.
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Old 11-16-2011, 05:19 AM
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Originally Posted by madac View Post
And the exhaust cooler should be warm to hot through running as it's designed as a heatsink to take heat away from the air being pushed through it, instead check the fuel tubing temp before the exhaust cooler and then compare it to the tempurature of the fuel tubing after the exhaust cooler to the tank and then see if there is a difference. I found out that it is over 30 degrees lower after the cooler. Is the head on your engine hot right after you run it, yes it is because it is a heatsink disippating the heat from the rest of your engine check the heat at the glow plug and then check the heat of the head itself and see if there is a difference.
I have some ocean front property for FREE in Wisconsin for you.

Your right, It is supposed to be a "exhaust cooler" but it's PURPOSE is not to heat the fuel in the tank...I have news for you, you do NOT get hot "flowing" exhaust into your tank. If you did, you would have a leak in the tank because that hot "flowing" exhaust has to have a place to go. A fuel tank does NOT have a exhaust system It dosen't just get soaked up in the plastic walls of the tank either.

Even if it was flowing over the fuel, do you know how long it would take to heat up fuel? LONG TIME and before it even started to heat the fuel, the fuel would be GONE, used up through your engine.

You go ahead and believe what you want. You obviously paid for it and feel the need to justify the expense...
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Old 11-16-2011, 06:18 AM
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The thickness of the oil chan change a lot in a small temperature range, that is the real reasin an exhaust cooler can make a difference in a yes or no stable tuniing.
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Old 11-16-2011, 07:58 AM
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Last edited by Sideshow Bob; 11-16-2011 at 08:52 AM.
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Old 11-16-2011, 07:58 AM
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QUOTE=Roelof;9917601]The thickness of the oil chan change a lot in a small temperature range, that is the real reasin an exhaust cooler can make a difference in a yes or no stable tuniing.[/QUOTE]

If stable tuning is the goal, I'd have more faith in a pressure regulator.


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Old 11-16-2011, 09:29 AM
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The same can be done by just leaking away some backpressure:

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Old 11-16-2011, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by nitroexpress View Post
QUOTE=Roelof;9917601]The thickness of the oil chan change a lot in a small temperature range, that is the real reasin an exhaust cooler can make a difference in a yes or no stable tuniing.
If stable tuning is the goal, I'd have more faith in a pressure regulator.


[/QUOTE]

Explain its purpose understand about reg pressure but whats the benefits better fuel flow?
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Old 11-16-2011, 11:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Roelof View Post
The same can be done by just leaking away some backpressure:
What you show is a fixed bleed. The Orion, with it's bellows, regulates/changes pressure into the tank based on engine RPM. I haven't heard any feedback from users, so it's probably not that useful.
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Old 11-16-2011, 12:08 PM
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Originally Posted by nitroexpress View Post
What you show is a fixed bleed. The Orion, with it's bellows, regulates/changes pressure into the tank based on engine RPM. I haven't heard any feedback from users, so it's probably not that useful.
Both work simulair...
The Orion device will blow itself up when a hard pressure is comming in taking away the peak and when the pressure lowers down it will slowly give it back to the system, it does take out the high pressure pieks.
Just a small leak will do the same, an overpressure will be pushed out much stronger than low pressure, it makes the pressure more consistant as the Orion device also does but the only difference is that it will not go back to the system.
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Old 11-16-2011, 12:34 PM
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I think it was a worlds or at soem euros in 1:8th track they used the Orion thingy to make runtime. I have one, but never got araound to test it.

It works like Roelf says, it keeps a more constant pressure in the tank, so the fuel pressure is almaost equal at the carburtaor regardless of the enignes revs.
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Old 11-16-2011, 01:06 PM
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The main advantage is that you can go lean on the engine without getting a rich moment. Novarossi as an example needs a richer setting on the LSN so it will pick up RPM without cogging, if you go to lean you will notice a shortage on fuel.

That needed rich setting is eating milage but by taking away the peaks in the pressure is making the adjustment on the needles also less pressure sensitive
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Old 11-16-2011, 05:49 PM
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Originally Posted by got_nitro View Post
I have some ocean front property for FREE in Wisconsin for you.

Your right, It is supposed to be a "exhaust cooler" but it's PURPOSE is not to heat the fuel in the tank...I have news for you, you do NOT get hot "flowing" exhaust into your tank. If you did, you would have a leak in the tank because that hot "flowing" exhaust has to have a place to go. A fuel tank does NOT have a exhaust system It dosen't just get soaked up in the plastic walls of the tank either.

Even if it was flowing over the fuel, do you know how long it would take to heat up fuel? LONG TIME and before it even started to heat the fuel, the fuel would be GONE, used up through your engine.

You go ahead and believe what you want. You obviously paid for it and feel the need to justify the expense...
I'm wondering if you have tested the heat in the tank? Whether you believe the hot exhaust heats up the fuel or not is your problem but even a couple of degrees change in the fuel temperature can and will make a difference, where do you think the exhaust goes? Just disappears, mixes into the fuel or you may find it on your ocean front property in Wisconsin along with purple elephants.

I've seen expanded tanks through a day of racing and practice explain that if it's not from the exhaust that goes to the tank. And the exhaust in the tank is the pressure that pushes your fuel to your engine. The cooler the air in the tank makes for less pressure pushing through the lines and for me made it way more consistant instead of erratic and unpredictable. Take your pressure line off and test how much pressure goes through the line and test the end of the fuel line to see if it heats up or not.

I don't have to justify the expense of buying it because it does work and made my really good engine better and easier to tune. My engine ran great before and the exhaust cooler made it more predictable and way easier to tune.

Unless you have actually used one you have no room to judge anyone that has and had good real world results from using one. I gave him my results from my real world experience with the product which was very positive from my view point, if he wants to use one thats his choice not mine or your choice but if he doesn't that doesn't bother me one bit. And just for your information unless you have any actual legit proof of anything you've said maybe you should post it instead of just blowing it out of your ass, I have my opinion and my own results from using one in which I shared versus not using one and thats all I need.
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Old 11-16-2011, 06:36 PM
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Originally Posted by madac View Post
I'm wondering if you have tested the heat in the tank? Whether you believe the hot exhaust heats up the fuel or not is your problem but even a couple of degrees change in the fuel temperature can and will make a difference, where do you think the exhaust goes? Just disappears, mixes into the fuel or you may find it on your ocean front property in Wisconsin along with purple elephants.

I've seen expanded tanks through a day of racing and practice explain that if it's not from the exhaust that goes to the tank. And the exhaust in the tank is the pressure that pushes your fuel to your engine. The cooler the air in the tank makes for less pressure pushing through the lines and for me made it way more consistant instead of erratic and unpredictable. Take your pressure line off and test how much pressure goes through the line and test the end of the fuel line to see if it heats up or not.

I don't have to justify the expense of buying it because it does work and made my really good engine better and easier to tune. My engine ran great before and the exhaust cooler made it more predictable and way easier to tune.

Unless you have actually used one you have no room to judge anyone that has and had good real world results from using one. I gave him my results from my real world experience with the product which was very positive from my view point, if he wants to use one thats his choice not mine or your choice but if he doesn't that doesn't bother me one bit. And just for your information unless you have any actual legit proof of anything you've said maybe you should post it instead of just blowing it out of your ass, I have my opinion and my own results from using one in which I shared versus not using one and thats all I need.
I had this long reply typed out to slap you around but I thought nah..

A couple of degrees in fuel temp could be the ambient temp out side any given day.

Nice try..... Psychosomatic, look it up!
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