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Tuning With Glow Plug

Old 06-29-2020, 10:35 AM
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Default Tuning With Glow Plug

Hello, Should I be changing glow plug types based on out-side temps? For example this past weekend it was 105 during the qualifiers and the mains were at night and the temp dropped 20 degrees. At that point should I be using a cooler glow plug. I have a P3 in it normally and use 30% nitro for the buggy.

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Old 06-29-2020, 12:25 PM
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What engine? Either way, the P3 have a large ambient temperature so no worries there. Just adjust the carb tuning according to ambient temps and engine performance.
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Old 06-29-2020, 12:31 PM
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Originally Posted by sebtarta View Post
What engine? Either way, the P3 have a large ambient temperature so no worries there. Just adjust the carb tuning according to ambient temps and engine performance.
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Old 06-29-2020, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by sebtarta View Post
What engine? Either way, the P3 have a large ambient temperature so no worries there. Just adjust the carb tuning according to ambient temps and engine performance.
ProTek Samurai. Thanks. I was looking at buying more Glow Plugs and looking at the different ones got me thinking.
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Old 06-29-2020, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by ceh329 View Post
ProTek Samurai. Thanks. I was looking at buying more Glow Plugs and looking at the different ones got me thinking.
Yes P3 is perfect for that engine.

Also were these races at Southside Lake City FL, by any chance? We had this happened on Saturday to us after the rain.
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Old 06-29-2020, 01:43 PM
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It is all about ignition timing....

When it is hotter outside the ignition timing can shift to a sooner moment, it is a small shift but can affect the performance and temperature of the engine. This small change can be corrected by a colder glowplug.

Larger steps in shifting of the ignition timing is caused by the nitro content when you lets say go from 30 to 20% nitro. This huge change can be corrected by taking out a small headshim.
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Old 06-29-2020, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by sebtarta View Post
Yes P3 is perfect for that engine.

Also were these races at Southside Lake City FL, by any chance? We had this happened on Saturday to us after the rain.
Thank you. No sorry, I'm in Cali.
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Old 06-29-2020, 08:22 PM
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You don't use a cooler glowplug in cooler temperatures. You use a hotter glowplug in cooler temperatures. The hotter glowplug will compensate for the cooler temperature, keeping the ignition timing close to ideal. However, 20F isn't enough to justify changing to a different glowplug; there are any number of other variables that affect the ignition timing from one combustion cycle to the next, so with our little 2-stroke engines the ignition timing is always approximate anyway.

I run hot glowplugs in two engines. One of them is in my winter nitro truck, which gets driven in freezing temperatures, sometimes even in light snow. The other is in a 1/10-scale monster truck with a .18 engine that's a little too small for driving in grass; I had to increase the shim stack to reduce the compression ratio so I wouldn't burn-out the engine, and then I needed a hot glowplug to ensure proper ignition at low RPMs with the lower compression ratio. All of my other engines use medium glowplugs. As far as I can tell, hot glowplugs are a workaround for engines with poor ignition or running in very cold (refrigerator or colder) temperatures; they will burn-out if subjected to sustained high-RPM running under normal conditions. Likewise, cold glowplugs are only necessary for engines that run at high RPM continuously in hot conditions and need a glow coil that is extra thick and durable to handle the stress. Medium glowplugs are the best option for general-purpose driving. You can adjust ignition timing by swapping glowplugs, but I haven't found much benefit from that; once you've gotten an engine dialed-in, all you should need to do to compensate for ambient temperature is to adjust the HSN fuel mixture a little bit to maintain a consistent operating temperature from one day to the next. Everyone has their own version of engine-tuning voodoo that they swear by, but I haven't needed to replace a glowplug in a couple years, so I must be doing something right.
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