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Seattle RC Racers/Hangar 30

Old 12-10-2014, 04:46 PM
  #16876  
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Originally Posted by boylrmakr
I'm there, but what's that smell? You smell it?

Could it be the smell of:

A. Hot motors
B. Hot rubber
C. SXT
D. Kody's TQ time
E. A big bag of Dicks
F. Downwind from Adam
G. Doug's space heater
H. RACE DAY
I. ALL OF THE ABOVE

Please pick one.
Does answer E come in a box also?
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Old 12-10-2014, 11:32 PM
  #16877  
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Man, the hangar track is a beast. Such a good feeling to nail a lap, though.

-Mike
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Old 12-11-2014, 08:23 AM
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Thank you Kyle for continuing to follow through on leading our hangar program and providing us with a midweek race venue. Seattle's December afternoon/evening traffic is a slog, no question. But, H30 racing is worth the effort for those who can manage it.

The hangar is a beast. Always has been, always will. Stuart and I are having fun, though. He's soooo competitive with his father! You can tell when he's up there, how badly he wants to win. But, other than inverting the order for the main, I offered no quarter, and he wouldn't take any. He wants it straight up. So, I gave it to him. He held tough for 5+ minutes, and then the seam coming right to left through the chicane which grabs us 1/12th scalers caught him out and looped his car. I got past and didn't let up. He was furious with himself. But, by the time we got home he was looking toward the next one.

Competitive activities which allow youngsters and grownups to share the same field of play on even terms are rare. The only other sport that comes to mind where I have any experience is match shooting. The value I see in a young person being expected to show respect for the effort of others while not giving up his or her own ambition to win is huge. They are hard lessons at any age.
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Old 12-11-2014, 10:12 AM
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Todd, is Stuart doing his own wrenching yet?

-Mike
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Old 12-11-2014, 10:36 AM
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More and more.

At home:
He cuts his own tires, including, as of late, rounding the edges and sandpapering the contact surface. I still mount the tires to the arbor so they don't wobble, as that's where the "teach your son to do it" meets "don't waste a $12 set of foams" tend to collide. Plus, he can't press CRC fronts onto a CRC arbor. It's a tight fit.

He cuts out the lower part of his bodies (I still mount and mask. He paints, provided I'm not doing it after his bedtime. There's always that.)

He cuts out the stickers.

For tuning, I'm showing him everything, and having him do it, but I also double-check, so the show-do-redo is a jumble of him and myself.

For additional reference, at home, he is also getting pretty good at cutting his own food with a knife and fork. Perhaps there are 9 year-olds handier with a knife and fork than him, but he's reasonably representative of the class.

At the track, time permitting:
He switches front tires left to right.
He checks is ride height and camber.

I absolutely will not let him sauce or clean tires. And I handle the battery charging.

He pins his own body on, and as of Victoria last year, he gets himself through tech without my hovering.

There are times when I just do it, and that's as much about me as him. I need to tape a sign to the top of my pit board: "Let Stuart do It!"

It's also true that managing his enthusiasm and patience along with my own is not always straightforward.
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Old 12-11-2014, 10:42 AM
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Oh the kid can sauce his tires. I got a 5 minute lecture on how I need to use a brush instead of the dobber for precision saucing That kid is great!
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Old 12-11-2014, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by PutAwayWet
More and more.

At home:
He cuts his own tires, including, as of late, rounding the edges and sandpapering the contact surface. I still mount the tires to the arbor so they don't wobble, as that's where the "teach your son to do it" meets "don't waste a $12 set of foams" tend to collide. Plus, he can't press CRC fronts onto a CRC arbor. It's a tight fit.

He cuts out the lower part of his bodies (I still mount and mask. He paints, provided I'm not doing it after his bedtime. There's always that.)

He cuts out the stickers.

For tuning, I'm showing him everything, and having him do it, but I also double-check, so the show-do-redo is a jumble of him and myself.

For additional reference, at home, he is also getting pretty good at cutting his own food with a knife and fork. Perhaps there are 9 year-olds handier with a knife and fork than him, but he's reasonably representative of the class.

At the track, time permitting:
He switches front tires left to right.
He checks is ride height and camber.

I absolutely will not let him sauce or clean tires. And I handle the battery charging.

He pins his own body on, and as of Victoria last year, he gets himself through tech without my hovering.

There are times when I just do it, and that's as much about me as him. I need to tape a sign to the top of my pit board: "Let Stuart do It!"

It's also true that managing his enthusiasm and patience along with my own is not always straightforward.
Adopt me.
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Old 12-11-2014, 11:31 PM
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Just going over the rules and regs for this to see what I need. I've never had a street/carpet racer so I'm...a bit buried. SO many different standards. Which one gets the most racing? Or is it pretty evenly split? Wouldn't want to waste time and money on a car that doesn't see much use.
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Old 12-12-2014, 01:17 AM
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Originally Posted by KaneBlaireau
Just going over the rules and regs for this to see what I need. I've never had a street/carpet racer so I'm...a bit buried. SO many different standards. Which one gets the most racing? Or is it pretty evenly split? Wouldn't want to waste time and money on a car that doesn't see much use.
I'd say it comes down to skill level and how fast you want to go. Scale Spec, 17.5 TC, and Mod TC all have solid fields. Mod TC doesn't run wednesdays, and it doesn't usually run at NORA, so Scale Spec and 17.5 will give you more opportunities to race. Scale Spec is probably the closest racing. If you're new to on road and carpet, it's probably the best place to start. If you're a novice, we also consistently have a novice class. But for novice, building your car for scale spec is still recommended.

If you're more interested in pan cars, 17.5 1/12 is probably the way to go. The Wednesday and NORA fields are light, though.

Post up what you've got to work with, and we can figure out something to get you on the track!

-Mike
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Old 12-12-2014, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by KaneBlaireau
Just going over the rules and regs for this to see what I need. I've never had a street/carpet racer so I'm...a bit buried. SO many different standards. Which one gets the most racing? Or is it pretty evenly split? Wouldn't want to waste time and money on a car that doesn't see much use.
It may look complicated, but it's not. Fundamentally, you're looking at two different platforms for our regular classes. A 1/10 4wd touring car, or 1/12th pan car.

Do this:

1. Purchase a touring car. (Used roller, mid-price new...I recommend building.)
2. Purchase an ESC. I recommend a Hobbywing Justock.
3. Purchase a Novak 25.5 brushless motor.
4. Purchase a steering servo (spend $35.)
6. Build your car.
7. Calculate a 3.6 final drive ratio based on your car's internal ratio.
8. Based on your post, I'm thinking you may already own radio/charger/batteries and are competent to install them.
9. Attach HPI vintage treaded tires, 31mm rears, 26mm fronts.
10. Browse scale bodies and choose one (this is particularly fun.) Above all, pick something rad.
11. Mount it, then paint it, and apply stickers. It should look cool when you're done. This is very important and I'm not just being cute.

Depending on your skill level, you will be racing in either Novice at first, then Scale Spec, or you can jump directly into Scale Spec. Expect to race in Scale Spec for at least a year. It races everywhere in the northwest and is reliably competitive and fun. It is truly the foundation class of onroad racing in this region.

You are investing in a long-term hobby. Buy good stuff up front, but don't overspend. Money spent on a high end touring car can be better allocated to quality tools. Set aside a dedicated space at home to work on your car. You don't need a lot, it just needs to be organized and available.

Have fun!
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Old 12-12-2014, 10:32 AM
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OMG, Alex D, your dream come true!

http://www.redrc.net/2014/12/gforce-...d-controllers/

-Mike
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Old 12-12-2014, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by grippgoat
OMG, Alex D, your dream come true!

http://www.redrc.net/2014/12/gforce-...d-controllers/

-Mike
And he's on the comp committee. Prepare yourself for next season ! Lol
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Old 12-12-2014, 10:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Magnet Top
And he's on the comp committee. Prepare yourself for next season ! Lol

has to be ROAR legal..
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Old 12-12-2014, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by PutAwayWet
It may look complicated, but it's not. Fundamentally, you're looking at two different platforms for our regular classes. A 1/10 4wd touring car, or 1/12th pan car.

Do this:

1. Purchase a touring car. (Used roller, mid-price new...I recommend building.)
2. Purchase an ESC. I recommend a Hobbywing Justock.
3. Purchase a Novak 25.5 brushless motor.
4. Purchase a steering servo (spend $35.)
6. Build your car.
7. Calculate a 3.6 final drive ratio based on your car's internal ratio.
8. Based on your post, I'm thinking you may already own radio/charger/batteries and are competent to install them.
9. Attach HPI vintage treaded tires, 31mm rears, 26mm fronts.
10. Browse scale bodies and choose one (this is particularly fun.) Above all, pick something rad.
11. Mount it, then paint it, and apply stickers. It should look cool when you're done. This is very important and I'm not just being cute.

Depending on your skill level, you will be racing in either Novice at first, then Scale Spec, or you can jump directly into Scale Spec. Expect to race in Scale Spec for at least a year. It races everywhere in the northwest and is reliably competitive and fun. It is truly the foundation class of onroad racing in this region.

You are investing in a long-term hobby. Buy good stuff up front, but don't overspend. Money spent on a high end touring car can be better allocated to quality tools. Set aside a dedicated space at home to work on your car. You don't need a lot, it just needs to be organized and available.

Have fun!
Hmm organized... What's that mean?
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Old 12-12-2014, 01:01 PM
  #16890  
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Originally Posted by KaneBlaireau
Just going over the rules and regs for this to see what I need. I've never had a street/carpet racer so I'm...a bit buried. SO many different standards. Which one gets the most racing? Or is it pretty evenly split? Wouldn't want to waste time and money on a car that doesn't see much use.
If I were to recommend something to buy, I would say that it would be very hard to beat the value of Lem's TC with speedo for $175. http://www.rctech.net/forum/13715543-post12145.html
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