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Old 11-04-2002, 01:58 PM   #61
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So if I use Diff oil, do I have to get an up graded Diff? Cause the one I have is only a bunch of spider gears.........

Rob
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Old 11-04-2002, 02:52 PM   #62
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Default Upgraded diffs

No such thing for the Nitro RS4. Just try Diff Grease. If any of your LHS's don't carry it. I'm sure that you can order some online.
As for what weights. I would put the lowest viscosity availible in the rear, then go up about double for the front. If you go too thick in the front then the car will push.
Maybe go to the Ofna web site to see what they have to offer.
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Old 11-04-2002, 05:09 PM   #63
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Default Re: The object of the game is..

Quote:
Originally posted by popsracer
You can EASILY spend more than the cost of a new car in hop-ups for the HPI. Try not to get caught up in the hop-up game. Race with what you have now (with better tires/set-up) and when the car can take you no futher, just buy another car. I know all of this because I've been down both paths.

Have fun racing.
LoL, Sooooo true, LOL. Some call RS4's "money pits. I learned a lot with my 1st car, Racer 2. But then I bought another, and another.
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Old 11-04-2002, 08:45 PM   #64
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If your LHS doesnt carry diff grease, go to a car parts shop that just sells minor things like lights and seats and stuff and they normally have grease and stuff there.
Get a high temp bearing grease which is normally good for the front and then there is another type of thinner bearing grease that you can get there as well.

It works wonders.
Thats what i have in my V-One S but i have the lighter in the front so it wants to slide around a bit and get tailish in and out of corners.

You can get some good 10 metre power slides and then u just back off the throttle and turn it out of the slide and ease back on and u've just had a beautiful corner
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Old 11-04-2002, 08:52 PM   #65
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will adding diff oil slow the car down?

Getting Oil/Grease is not a problem, I work in an autoparts store...
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Old 11-04-2002, 08:56 PM   #66
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The oil and grease adjust how quickly power can transfer from being 50/50 to 100/0 a which will adjust handling properties since a car that in a corner cant change its transfer will want to slide because the outside tyre is going to slow to keep traction, but if it can transfer too much the power will unload on the inside wheel and will spin out because the outside wheel is coasting and the inside wheel is spinning with no grip.

But no it will not slow the Vehicle just power transfer through-out the diff. which will help handling.
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Old 11-04-2002, 09:03 PM   #67
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Are you online now Fiream?

(On messenger that is) (cause u arnt showing up if u r)
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Old 11-04-2002, 09:05 PM   #68
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Yeah i'm on.

Try all caps


fiream- no
FIREAM- yes
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Old 11-04-2002, 09:16 PM   #69
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Nope didnt work, try re-adding me
[email protected]

Thanks
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Old 11-04-2002, 09:18 PM   #70
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Default Grease is Grease?

The advantage of using R/C car diff grease is that it is labeled by viscosity so you have a point of reference for tuning your diffs.
Also even a high temp automotive grease will melt and leak out of the diffs.
But anything is better than nothing. If you go the Automotive grease route. Then put a high temp in the front and a little Vasoline in the rear. Remember balance is a important factor.
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Old 11-04-2002, 09:21 PM   #71
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Well the high temp bearing grease i have, if it melts i wanna know why my car didnt melt.
It has a rating of 500 degree celsius. My car would go before it would.
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Old 11-05-2002, 03:25 AM   #72
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It doesn't really overheat, it just disappears

J/K, its just that it gets thrown into the crevises, and some gets out and so you need to put some in quite often.
You really do need quite a lot of grease. otherwise your diff is too soft and you have that situation where your rear differential diffs so much that your car loses traction. Make your rear differential just slightly softer than the front.

Using thin oil in the rear is a 1/8 scale buggy trick used on TTR EB4's b/c the buggy has too much grip coming out of the corners. They use just enough bearing oil (or similarly thin grease) to keep the diff from overheating and messing up the case and the gears. For a touring car, this type of a diff setting only helps me do those cool spinouts that last for as long as you want them too. (you know, the first thing you did with your first car when you got it)
For racing, your diffs must be tighter then just what resistance a little Vaseline will give you from my experience.
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Old 11-05-2002, 05:57 AM   #73
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hi everybody,
i am new in this forum
i am now wondering what about the yokomo's tires and hpi's in your point of view?
thanks in advance
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Old 11-05-2002, 09:23 AM   #74
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Default Yokomo-vs HPI

Hpi "R" series tires do work fairly well in some conditions. However, I find that their temperature range for each compound is very small and that they will loose grip completely if you go out of the specified range. I DO love HPI inserts for the range of hardnesses that they offer compared to anyone elses. I use them in ALL my tires now.

Yokomo 138G's are the most popular Yoko tire. They come is 3 temerature ranges, "G", "GF" & "GH". Each being rated for a higher temperature. HPI 24mm inserts work great in these tires also. Yokomo has a 136S compund that works good in cooler temps (under 80 deg F). I have not tried the 139G series, but have heard that they are thinner and wear out very fast. Yokomo's work best on rougher asphalt (like in most streets).

Team Sorex tires offer several compounds; 24R, 28R, 32R, 36R & 40R. Each rated for a higher temperature. Sorex's work in a wider range of temps than what is claimed by the manufacturer. Sorex tires work best on smooth sealed/resealed asphalt. (slurry sealed).

Take-Off tires a proving to be popular with the racers out here. I have not tried them yet, but other racers say they work good on any surface. I do not know how many temperature ranges are avalible other than 27CS (which I just bought)

Hope this helps a little.
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Old 11-05-2002, 06:21 PM   #75
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thanks so much for ur detail imformation.
i've tried 138gfand 139g. it's true that the 139g wear out easily.
in addition i did find that 138gf is great for me at least in the first 2hours.
and now i am to go with hpi 33r. what do u think of the range of temperature of the 33r ?
as a matter of fact, it was hard for me to find sorex good on some of my street condition(coz we donot have some pressional racing place, most of us drive on parking lot or playground )
maybe i should try some takeoff as u say
thanks again
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