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Old 01-31-2014, 07:22 PM   #1
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Default wire vs blade sway bar

hi, would like to know why a wire type sway bar is supposed to be better and faster reacting on smaller technical tracks than a blade type bar? always trying to learn more about the design and mechanics in the hobby.
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Old 01-31-2014, 08:49 PM   #2
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the blade sway bar I have on my nitro TC3 is rotatable, which means it is adjustable. If you flaten the blade out, it becomes softer. If you stand the blade up, it becomes stiffer.
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Old 02-01-2014, 01:12 AM   #3
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Generally the latest trend is wire ARB's as they are more progressive and I think they are a touch softer than the blade bars at full flat setting. Most cars now allow quick changes of wire ARB as well. Another benefit of wire ARB's is that they are easier to setup and get the tweak out - bar ARB's with the cam's are notoriously more difficult to get completely tweak free.
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Old 02-01-2014, 03:19 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikiehotrod View Post
hi, would like to know why a wire type sway bar is supposed to be better and faster reacting on smaller technical tracks than a blade type bar? always trying to learn more about the design and mechanics in the hobby.
only my opinion, but the wire keeps the resistance/stiffnes the same during compression and arm movement, while the blade distorts and deflects a little when not used flat. It will try to move the direction wich is flat when applied in an angle and so the stiffness wil be lesser in the movement from the arm/wheel while compressing more because of deflecting.
short corners one tends to let the car dive more in the front and so applying more force on the arb. In smooth corners its mostly little braking and on the throttle wich is little force on the arb.
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Old 02-01-2014, 03:33 AM   #5
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I don't think there is too much of a performance differential on track in all fairness, I think either can be set up to be quick, I just think too many people were misusing the blade type, wire bars are much easier for the end user and will generally allow them to get a better overall handling car much easier.

I wouldn't read too much into the performance aspect, it's just marketing hype.

Only my opinion though..
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Old 02-01-2014, 03:55 AM   #6
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The wire has less play makes it more direct in feeling and working.
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Old 02-02-2014, 02:00 PM   #7
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thank you to all. all make good points. I have always had blade type ARB front and back.
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Old 02-02-2014, 02:13 PM   #8
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Blades can also be setup asymmetrically
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Old 02-02-2014, 02:24 PM   #9
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Blades can also be setup asymmetrically
yes I have seen guys do this (harder one side/softer on the other).
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:49 AM   #10
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A bar roll bar is a REAL roll bar and a blade is not. Especially on the front of the car.
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Old 02-03-2014, 04:22 PM   #11
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A bar roll bar is a REAL roll bar and a blade is not. Especially on the front of the car.
please explain you answer a little further.
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Old 02-04-2014, 07:58 AM   #12
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please explain you answer a little further.
A roll bar mounts to the car at four points, 2 at the lower suspension arm and 2 on the chassis. The two chassis points are what I refer to as reaction points. When going hard into a left corner, the right side suspension point raises and reacts at the right side chassis point causing weight transfer diagonally across the car to the left rear wheel. The same but opposite happens in a right turn. I have studied the roll blade setup and used it on occasion. Unless I'm missing something, I see no chassis reaction point in the design and therefore does little if any diagonal weight transfer.
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Old 02-04-2014, 09:10 AM   #13
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A roll bar mounts to the car at four points, 2 at the lower suspension arm and 2 on the chassis. The two chassis points are what I refer to as reaction points. When going hard into a left corner, the right side suspension point raises and reacts at the right side chassis point causing weight transfer diagonally across the car to the left rear wheel. The same but opposite happens in a right turn. I have studied the roll blade setup and used it on occasion. Unless I'm missing something, I see no chassis reaction point in the design and therefore does little if any diagonal weight transfer.
No, the forces at the tire patches are the same with either setup if adjusted properly. A simple experiment is to simply leave the shocks and springs off the chassis, and connect only the sway bar. Support the chassis on blocks so it can't move. You'll find that both types of sway bar affect roll stiffness, but don't contribute to bump stiffness.

The blade style is used in many real racing cars simply because it permits the driver to adjust the stiffness while driving.
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Old 02-04-2014, 05:58 PM   #14
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No, the forces at the tire patches are the same with either setup if adjusted properly. A simple experiment is to simply leave the shocks and springs off the chassis, and connect only the sway bar. Support the chassis on blocks so it can't move. You'll find that both types of sway bar affect roll stiffness, but don't contribute to bump stiffness.

The blade style is used in many real racing cars simply because it permits the driver to adjust the stiffness while driving.
thank you for this explanation. I would like to try this and see the difference myself. I have seen this on real race cars and would think if it worked there,should work for us.
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Old 02-06-2014, 01:13 PM   #15
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I had the pleasure of spending quite some time looking at an old Lotus 49 recently and it had an adjustable blade rear roll bar on the end of wire type, clever set up which allowed the mechanics to change the roll stiffness very quickly.
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