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Old 03-20-2006, 05:14 AM   #5431
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The coning is large inside, small outside. I changed it to 3.5 last night, but since I didn't get a chance to run it today, I'll have to wait and see. Next race is not until April 2nd.

I will seriously take a look at running the P8. P7 might be a good choice as well. What % Nito are you using? I'm using 20%

The humidity in Hawaii is very high. Humidity was averaging 76% with a high of 90%. Temperature was 81. I'm not sure how this compares to Germany when you are racing and plug choice.

After reading your post, I went to the O.S. Engines "How to Choose the Right Glow Plug" at http://www.osengines.com/accys/choosing-glowplugs.html. Any comments? Just caus O.S. says so, doesn't mean that it works that way.

I'll try your technique for tuning the engine and see how that goes. I haven't read that particular technique before, so it will be intersting to see how that turns out. I would really like to try and tune the engine myself, even if it takes a while or I blow up the engine. I think it's important to try and tune it myself using different techniques.

Will also try factory default settings with the P6 as you just posted.

Thanks Mark!
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Old 03-20-2006, 05:58 AM   #5432
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmdhawaii
The coning is large inside, small outside. I changed it to 3.5 last night, but since I didn't get a chance to run it today, I'll have to wait and see. Next race is not until April 2nd.
Ok, then you do need more camber.

Quote:
I will seriously take a look at running the P8. P7 might be a good choice as well. What % Nito are you using? I'm using 20%

The humidity in Hawaii is very high. Humidity was averaging 76% with a high of 90%. Temperature was 81. I'm not sure how this compares to Germany when you are racing and plug choice.
Temperatures and humidity in Germany are a lot lower - especially at this time of the year. I never tune my engines to the limit, I prefer to run them at a level where the performance is very good, but the chance of blowing them is small.
The P8 plug works well at all temperatures here and as the wire is thicker, the chances of blowing one is a lot lower

The % nitro we use here is quite low - we are only allowed to use 16%, but this makes the engine tuning easier.

Quote:
After reading your post, I went to the O.S. Engines "How to Choose the Right Glow Plug" at http://www.osengines.com/accys/choosing-glowplugs.html. Any comments? Just caus O.S. says so, doesn't mean that it works that way.
Its a good guide and really you need to find out what suits you best - but I would suggest you go for the safe side with the plug choice until you have more experience under your belt.

Quote:
I'll try your technique for tuning the engine and see how that goes. I haven't read that particular technique before, so it will be intersting to see how that turns out. I would really like to try and tune the engine myself, even if it takes a while or I blow up the engine. I think it's important to try and tune it myself using different techniques.

Will also try factory default settings with the P6 as you just posted.

Thanks Mark!
The factory settings won't work in their own right, they will give you a safe point to start from. If ever you have the feeling you're getting lost with your settings, simply return everything to default and start again.

Keep checking the plug, too, to ensure that it is in good condition. Prevention is better than it blowing.

Cheers, Mark.
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Old 03-20-2006, 07:35 AM   #5433
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will try on evola red spring and see if suit me
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Old 03-20-2006, 11:51 AM   #5434
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You will need a Nova #6 or #7 for high humidity climates--I don't know how that translates to OS plugs but it needs to be the hotter plugs.
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Old 03-20-2006, 12:07 PM   #5435
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I run OS #7 here in San Antonio where humidity is just as bad!! 30% fuel!!
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Old 03-20-2006, 12:37 PM   #5436
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[QUOTE=rmdhawaii]The coning is large inside, small outside. I changed it to 3.5 last night, but since I didn't get a chance to run it today, I'll have to wait and see. Next race is not until April 2nd. QUOTE]

If the rear camber is 2-3deg then you need to increase the camber change when cornering. Change the upper camber link to shortest and add 3mm shim under the camber connection to the rear hub
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Old 03-20-2006, 01:00 PM   #5437
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggy12345
If the rear camber is 2-3deg then you need to increase the camber change when cornering. Change the upper camber link to shortest and add 3mm shim under the camber connection to the rear hub
Do you mean 3mm inner diameter or thickness?
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Old 03-20-2006, 01:29 PM   #5438
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Does anyone have any recommendations for ceramic bearings?

Does anybody have any experience with the APS Racing set? (Part# APS87022) Is the set compatible with the WC Edition??

Thanks!
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Old 03-20-2006, 01:31 PM   #5439
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggy12345
If the rear camber is 2-3deg then you need to increase the camber change when cornering. Change the upper camber link to shortest and add 3mm shim under the camber connection to the rear hub
That's an interesting idea, Ziggy! Not having had this on the 710, I never thought about that.

I take it with the inner position, you get more camber when the suspension compresses in comparison to the outer position?

Why is the 3mm shim necessary?

Cheers, Mark.
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Old 03-20-2006, 01:36 PM   #5440
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmdhawaii
Does anyone have any recommendations for ceramic bearings?

Does anybody have any experience with the APS Racing set? (Part# APS87022) Is the set compatible with the WC Edition??

Thanks!
I wouldn't do it myself. I think checking and replacing bearings as soon as it becomes gritty is the best way to go. Since most of the bearing problems comes from collisions and dirt getting inside, ceramic bearings won't last much longer (if it does) and will just cost more.
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Old 03-20-2006, 01:39 PM   #5441
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmdhawaii
Does anybody have any experience with the APS Racing set? (Part# APS87022) Is the set compatible with the WC Edition??
Wow! It's $135.89 US @ buyrc.net
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Old 03-20-2006, 01:42 PM   #5442
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffreylin
I wouldn't do it myself. I think checking and replacing bearings as soon as it becomes gritty is the best way to go. Since most of the bearing problems comes from collisions and dirt getting inside, ceramic bearings won't last much longer (if it does) and will just cost more.
I'm of the same opinion - I once had a set and the rubber seals were really bad, they made contact with the bearings, thus causing aditional friction - my original bearings ran much better.
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Old 03-20-2006, 02:36 PM   #5443
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Interesting. I was more interested in the performance benefits. Given that all bearings are suseptible to dirt, damage and other types of failure, why wouldn't you want the faster bearing?

I found this online: http://www.edsbearings.com/faqbearings.html

Quote:
Question : What is the advantage of Ceramic ball bearings?

Answer : Ceramic bearings have the normal steel balls replaced by white ceramic balls. The ceramic balls are made of solid Silicon Nitrate. Ceramic silicon nitride balls are called ceramic but have nothing in common with household dish ceramics. They are called ceramic because it's easier calling them ceramic then Silicon Nitrate. The ceramic ball is by far, smoother, harder, lighter and stronger than one made off steel.

The following is a list of benefits of the ceramic Silicon Nitrate ball bearing -

LIGHTER. The ceramic ball is lighter then the steel ball. This means that the ball exerts less force outward against the outer race grove as the bearing spins. This reduction in outward force reduces the friction and rolling resistance. The lighter ball allows the bearing to rev up faster, and uses less energy to maintain it speed.

HARDER. The ceramic ball is harder then the steel ball. This gives you a bearing that will last up to 10 times longer then the steel ball bearing because it holds it's finish better.

SMOOTHER. The ceramic ball has smoother surface properties then the steel ball. This means less friction between the ball and bearing races giving you a faster spinning bearing.

THERMAL. The ceramic ball has better thermal properties then the steel ball. The ceramic ball will not heat up like a steel ball. This helps avoid heat build up in the bearing, a primary culprit in skate and skateboard bearing performance degradation.

LUBRICATION. The ceramic balls are impervious to oxidation, chemicals, and require essentially no lubricant. The bearings are lubricated with a very, very small amount of Aral Aralub oil, not a gel or grease.

SOLID CERAMIC. The ceramic balls are solid ceramic Silicon Nitrate. A cheaper ceramic bearing uses steel balls with a thin ceramic layer. The elastic and thermal property difference between steel and ceramic cause the ceramic to split and separate from the steel portion of the ball on these less expensive look a likes. Avoid this type of ceramic ball bearing.
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Old 03-20-2006, 02:40 PM   #5444
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From the APS Racing Web site:

Quote:
Now the choice of top drivers to reduce friction and get maximum power/acceleration. Corrosion resistant, durable stainless steel retainers; heat resistant and durable solid ceramic nitride balls, non-contact dual metal shields for maximum speed/protection, factory pre-lubricated low viscosity oil for less drag and higher rotating speed.
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Old 03-20-2006, 02:49 PM   #5445
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They cost so much more with IMHO very little benefit when it comes to nitro cars. The engines have so much power that you will never be able to see the difference. On electric cars, especially stock racing, it's a different story.

I race regularly and usually replace at least 6-12 bearings every 3 months. Instead of using ceremics, the same money could be used to buy more motors and tires and I'll definitely see the benefit there.
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