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Old 07-12-2004, 05:43 PM   #31
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Go with the shaft you will has better acceleration. and top speed is same wether belt and shaft.
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Old 07-12-2004, 06:37 PM   #32
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Shaft drive is easier to clean, easier to take apart and reassemble and less little pins to lose!! looking at the complication of belt drive in comparison to the shaft setup there is no competition!

people seem to be confusing the workings of a one way differential. Its not a "locker diff" it is limited slip and if you test you will find there is always an amount of slip in the setup
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Old 07-12-2004, 06:57 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally posted by Rabbit
Shaft drive is easier to clean, easier to take apart and reassemble and less little pins to lose!! looking at the complication of belt drive in comparison to the shaft setup there is no competition!

people seem to be confusing the workings of a one way differential. Its not a "locker diff" it is limited slip and if you test you will find there is always an amount of slip in the setup
Shaft drive cars require little fussy shims to get the gear mesh right in the gearbox. I have owned a number of both belt and shaft cars and I could not claim either was more complex. My R40 is around as easy as a shaft car to disassemble for routine maintenance.

If you have any slip in your one-way it is not working correct. They are locked or free, no slip.
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Old 07-12-2004, 07:10 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally posted by Rabbit
people seem to be confusing the workings of a one way differential. Its not a "locker diff" it is limited slip and if you test you will find there is always an amount of slip in the setup
All those one ways I've thrown away because they do not slip!!!!



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Old 07-12-2004, 07:29 PM   #35
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I have never seen or had a problem with torque steer even with the most powerfull nitro motor but I have seen problems when the cars are off power and braking slightly to hard with a one way they all spin out the same way. Maybe the torque??

I prefer shaft but I have seen some very impressive belt drive electric cars that make me think twice about have a belt drive car. In nitro all belt drive car run three belts which is very inefficent and the shaft drive cars are far superior
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Old 07-12-2004, 07:41 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally posted by frozenpod
I have never seen or had a problem with torque steer even with the most powerfull nitro motor but I have seen problems when the cars are off power and braking slightly to hard with a one way they all spin out the same way. Maybe the torque??

I prefer shaft but I have seen some very impressive belt drive electric cars that make me think twice about have a belt drive car. In nitro all belt drive car run three belts which is very inefficent and the shaft drive cars are far superior
I run at around 5 different tracks of all different shapes and lengths and people run all sorts of nitro and electric cars. I can absolutely tell you that a good driver with a shaft or belt car has no noticable advantage over another. My "inefficient" R40 beat a whole bunch of "superior" shaft cars the other day, and I out accelerated them at the same time. My friend with an XRAY EVO II has as good if not better punch from corners than a few guys with TC3s and Pro 4s.

At the recent JMRCA 2003 a MTX3 beat the other guys by 2 laps and a FW05R and HPI R40 were neck and neck for 2/3rd place. The shaft drive should have won right?

Buy a car you like, not because of the drivetrain layout. In 4 years of racing I have never retired from a race due to a rock, and in practice sessions I have probably ruined 2 pulleys. Once you go to dirty asphalt that will change a lot, and in that case I would absolutely recommend a shaft car.
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Old 07-12-2004, 07:42 PM   #37
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by AMGRacer
Shaft drive cars require little fussy shims to get the gear mesh right in the gearbox. I have owned a number of both belt and shaft cars and I could not claim either was more complex. My R40 is around as easy as a shaft car to disassemble for routine maintenance.

If you have any slip in your one-way it is not working correct. They are locked or free, no slip.
[/QUOTE

if you apply opposing force to both wheels there will be slip.. it makes no sense to have a fully locked diff!
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Old 07-12-2004, 07:45 PM   #38
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by Rabbit
Quote:
Originally posted by AMGRacer
Shaft drive cars require little fussy shims to get the gear mesh right in the gearbox. I have owned a number of both belt and shaft cars and I could not claim either was more complex. My R40 is around as easy as a shaft car to disassemble for routine maintenance.

If you have any slip in your one-way it is not working correct. They are locked or free, no slip.
[/QUOTE

if you apply opposing force to both wheels there will be slip.. it makes no sense to have a fully locked diff!
I am sorry my friend you are not correct. Both front wheels are locked under power. The tires themselves may slip.
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Old 07-12-2004, 07:52 PM   #39
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They certainly should be unless you are running a center one way.
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Old 07-12-2004, 08:03 PM   #40
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a front one way is designed to allow the inside tyre to run at a different speed to the outside tyre (one travels more than the other) so how can both be locked together.. doesnt make sense!!
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Old 07-12-2004, 08:07 PM   #41
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A front one-way let the wheels move free of power.

THen on power it drives the front wheels at the same speed ie locked you can get the same effect with a diff with 100,000 wieght oil in it.
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Old 07-12-2004, 08:07 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally posted by Rabbit
a front one way is designed to allow the inside tyre to run at a different speed to the outside tyre (one travels more than the other) so how can both be locked together.. doesnt make sense!!
Please trust me you are confused. You are describing a normal differential, in RC they are gear or ball type. A oneway differential is actually not a diff. It operates in 2 modes only full locked or full open. When full locked the inside wheel is being dragged across the surface and actually does lose some grip, similar to a heavily locked LSD in a real car.
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Old 07-12-2004, 08:09 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally posted by AMGRacer
Please trust me you are confused. You are describing a normal differential, in RC they are gear or ball type. A oneway differential is actually not a diff. It operates in 2 modes only full locked or full open. When full locked the inside wheel is being dragged across the surface and actually does lose some grip, similar to a heavily locked LSD in a real car.
Correct
With a one way you can pull out of slides better letting you go harder into corners, the way some people drive with them right on the edge and still be in control
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Old 07-12-2004, 08:09 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally posted by frozenpod
I used rubber tyres

But when I have used foam tyres I haven't had much of a problem with tyres wearing out unevenly. In fact they were almost perfect you couldn't tell a difference by sight only with verniers.
Overdrive does not work well with rubber tires on a nitro car. Many people assume overdrive is an aid to induce even tire wear over a run. This is far from true and these factors actually needs to be taken into consideration when using the overdrive system.

As the rears wear down faster than the fronts the car automatically induces overdrive from the bigger front tires at the expense of on power steering. Cutting (truing) the front tires down smaller than the rears improves on power steering especially with a one-way or solid axle in the front. With the smaller tires on the front you gain underdrive which makes the car push. To compensate you have to use the correct overdrive ratio to balance the roll out between the front and rear wheels again.

It becomes tricky to adjust because overdrive is not a static figure. As tires wear this figure changes (normally increasing in ratio). Over a longer 30-45min Main final this can cause problems and so many make the decision on whether they would rather be faster at the start and hope to build a good enough advantage or start with the car pushing the front knowing that the car will come to its best in the final stages were they can then launch a good attack on the other guys whos car set up has started to deteriorate.

Knowing the track and the wear rate of the tires over the given run time really help when setting the correct overdrive/underdrive ratio as you can roughly estimate at what point the car will be running at its optimum performance level during a race.
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Old 07-12-2004, 08:21 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally posted by AMGRacer
Please trust me you are confused. You are describing a normal differential, in RC they are gear or ball type. A oneway differential is actually not a diff. It operates in 2 modes only full locked or full open. When full locked the inside wheel is being dragged across the surface and actually does lose some grip, similar to a heavily locked LSD in a real car.
a one way diff works with 2 one way bearings, one for each wheel. under power and in a straight line there is no doubt that both wheels are locked. but if a car is mid corner and the outside wheel is spinning faster (under power or not) the one way bearing wil allow it to spin freely. correct?

hence you may say that this setup allows slip!
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