Serpent 710

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Old 04-08-2004, 08:54 PM
  #7966  
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Default Re: Titanium screws

Originally posted by KevinS
I'm looking for selftapping screws (prefer hex over philips) and an assortment of M3 screws. Is there anyone who can guide me to a good online shop for this? Thanks
I don't think you can find titanium self tapping screws anywhere...

As for M3 titanium screws, I'm afraid that your only source would be to get from Tamiya or from Speedmind. I got mine from Xenon Racing which is for the electric Barracuda car.
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Old 04-08-2004, 09:25 PM
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Default Piston Lapping

Just to clear out questions about lapping process.
Lapping process is hand done procedure, when some size will be set to desired amount. I have no idea why all manufacturers are making engines that tight, but defenetly with CNC machines it ca be done, so racers don't have to run in engines forever.
We used lapping procedure everywhere, specialy on custom made work.
Lapping piston tool is pretty much simple hand held device, look like bushing with bore diameter as piston diameter. It has cut on one side and tightening screw-so by tightening screw we can change internal dianeter. Simply can tell you, if anybody has MTX3 optional wheel hubs ( hexsogen outside)-so it looks similar. I still don't have digital camera, but ones I get one- I will put pics of it.
I use for final step lapping compaund grit 1800 mfg by Clover.
Please if somebody decided to try, first try on old piston-procedure looks pretty easy, but in the mean time very dangerouse-very easy overlap.
As a tip can give you my numbers for Novas based engines-dry piston stick to dry sleeve with little pressure and ones it stop mesure distance from the top of the sleeve to top of piston and I do 2.8-2.9 mm.
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Old 04-08-2004, 09:45 PM
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Default Re: Re: rear diff

Originally posted by InitialD
This is what I think happens...

Did you use any lube on the diff balls the first time you install the diff? I recommend using the Mugen Super Grease. I use it on my Centax thrust bearings and they are excellent. I only rub a thin layer on the diff balls before assembly.

But the trick is you need to do it the FIRST TIME. If you didn't, no matter how much lube or how many times you service it, the diff will remain gritty. I guess when you did not lube it the first time, the diff balls and the plates would already have "flat spots" which will still remain even after you lube it. That's the one that makes the diff gritty. I guess it's ok to have a gritty diff (need somebody else to confirm this) but if you want to make them like new again, replace the balls. Lube it with sparingly with the Mugen Super Grease and be done with it. I believe Serpent is coming out with 4 mm ceramic coated diff balls (1378) for the diff.

I still have mine very smooth as from day one and I have not needed to open it up to service it yet.
Initial, that must be it! Good diagnosis I didn't put any grease when I assembled it and now I had put also mugen's super grease. I thought that this was the cause of the diff's hardness -grease is so incredibly sticky- so I took it apart again, cleaned the grease off and assembled over again... but the diff is the same.

I guess I'll be ordering some 4mm balls

thanks
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Old 04-08-2004, 09:54 PM
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Default Re: Re: Re: rear diff

Originally posted by cox049
I guess I'll be ordering some 4mm balls
A lot of people here too are having the same "problem". Some even have that problem even after they put the special AE ball diff grease during first assembly. I guess the Mugen Super Grease is really super then.

Anyway, the ceramic coated balls will not be available too soon as I don't think it's even out yet. You can do with the 8378 which comes with the metal plates and the 12 diff balls. I suggest to replace the plates and the balls together.
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Old 04-08-2004, 10:09 PM
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Default Re: Re: Re: Re: rear diff

Originally posted by InitialD
A lot of people here too are having the same "problem". Some even have that problem even after they put the special AE ball diff grease during first assembly. I guess the Mugen Super Grease is really super then.

Anyway, the ceramic coated balls will not be available too soon as I don't think it's even out yet. You can do with the 8378 which comes with the metal plates and the 12 diff balls. I suggest to replace the plates and the balls together.
Cant you get ceramic diff balls from a 3rd party?
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Old 04-08-2004, 10:55 PM
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Schumacher makes 4mm Carbide diff balls... They're super smooth and last forever.

A tip from Chester P.!
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Old 04-08-2004, 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by NitroHead
Schumacher makes 4mm Carbide diff balls... They're super smooth and last forever.

A tip from Chester P.!
Cool. Thanks for the heads up.
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Old 04-09-2004, 12:05 AM
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Has anyone heard of any drivers going as low as 2mm for ride height, depending on track surface?
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Old 04-09-2004, 12:08 AM
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Originally posted by cyba888
Has anyone heard of any drivers going as low as 2mm for ride height, depending on track surface?
I believe Julius mentioned that the lowest he went was 3 mm because even at that ride height, chassis scrapes the track and makes driving difficult.

Why do you need to go that low?
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Old 04-09-2004, 01:55 AM
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Default Re: Re: rear diff

Originally posted by InitialD
... I have not needed to open it up to service it yet.
Are the inside parts still clean ?
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Old 04-09-2004, 02:03 AM
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Default Re: Re: Re: rear diff

Originally posted by redsand
Are the inside parts still clean ?
Well, it should be. No gritty feeling.
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Old 04-09-2004, 02:18 AM
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Originally posted by InitialD
I believe Julius mentioned that the lowest he went was 3 mm because even at that ride height, chassis scrapes the track and makes driving difficult.

Why do you need to go that low?
I was told that someone at my track uses 2mm ride height. I myself have tried 3mm front and 3.5mm rear and find no problems at all.
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Old 04-09-2004, 02:23 AM
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Originally posted by cyba888
I was told that someone at my track uses 2mm ride height. I myself have tried 3mm front and 3.5mm rear and find no problems at all.
If you don't mind grinding your 4 mm chassis right down to 3 mm or 2 mm, then I guess it's fine !

But seriously, you can have handling problems like what may seem to be understeering when the chassis touches the ground. I would think especially when on power.

Have a look at the 710 setups at mytsn. I don't think anybody uses lower than 3 mm.
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Old 04-09-2004, 02:55 AM
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Originally posted by InitialD
If you don't mind grinding your 4 mm chassis right down to 3 mm or 2 mm, then I guess it's fine !

But seriously, you can have handling problems like what may seem to be understeering when the chassis touches the ground. I would think especially when on power.

Have a look at the 710 setups at mytsn. I don't think anybody uses lower than 3 mm.
Will put some tape under the chassis just to see how much it scrapes at different ride heights.
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Old 04-09-2004, 03:13 AM
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Originally posted by cyba888
Will put some tape under the chassis just to see how much it scrapes at different ride heights.
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