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1/8 Buggy Tires/Setup Theory

1/8 Buggy Tires/Setup Theory

Old 11-22-2013, 09:32 PM
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Default 1/8 Buggy Tires/Setup Theory

Alright guys, looking at getting into buggy racing. I'll be crossing over from on-road, so it will be a pretty steep learning curve, but I'd like to start with setup theory and the like so I don't need to worry about that as well as trying to work in that wonderful Z-axis of movement.

What sorts of tire compounds and patterns do certain things? Obviously you tune compound by temps for the most part, but how do you know when you get to a track which tire to run?

Also, I've got a pretty good grasp on how to setup a touring car, which is probably the most similar on-road car to a buggy. What sorts of things should I be looking for to have a car that's stable and drivable over jumps as well as the flats?

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Old 11-23-2013, 02:41 AM
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It's all about dirt texture and moisture content when it comes to tire selection. My personal theory is this:

Wet loose track I use tall spaced lug tires....like the AkA Moto medium

Dry loose track.....soft short lugs like AKA enduro

Dry hard packed....I go to super soft compounds

Wet tight track I use soft/medium aka crossbrace....a very good all around tire as well

The way I look at it, soft ground harder compound and vice versa. If the dirt is damp it will want to stick in the treads so a wider spaced pattern helps let it sling out down straights and so forth. When it's dry and hard you use the rubber to get traction so softer tighter pattern works better.

There a lot of tire choices out there, but frankly it's all ridiculous. I have about 3-4 different sets that I have found through trial and error that I really like and I keep those in my bag and I always seem to have the right tire for the tracks I've raced at.
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Old 11-23-2013, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by motoclay View Post
It's all about dirt texture and moisture content when it comes to tire selection. My personal theory is this:

Wet loose track I use tall spaced lug tires....like the AkA Moto medium

Dry loose track.....soft short lugs like AKA enduro

Dry hard packed....I go to super soft compounds

Wet tight track I use soft/medium aka crossbrace....a very good all around tire as well

The way I look at it, soft ground harder compound and vice versa. If the dirt is damp it will want to stick in the treads so a wider spaced pattern helps let it sling out down straights and so forth. When it's dry and hard you use the rubber to get traction so softer tighter pattern works better.

There a lot of tire choices out there, but frankly it's all ridiculous. I have about 3-4 different sets that I have found through trial and error that I really like and I keep those in my bag and I always seem to have the right tire for the tracks I've raced at.
Good info, if it is a dry track with a dust or loose layer on top, then look for a tire with mini tread blocks or a mini pin style tire, then the tire can get down and bite against the hardpack underneath.
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Old 11-23-2013, 02:07 PM
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If you are a club racer only, you likely only need two tires. One for wet, one for dry. The regulars will know what is best. The travellers tell me you can get away with just three sets: a mini pin, a medium to big lug like and a step pin.

Google JQ THE Guide or Hudy Set Up guide for off road specific tuning info.

Ride height is especially key, it deals with not only corners but landings and takeoffs. If you bottom out going up a ramp you will nose forward steeply off the jump.

One thing no one told me immediately was the concept of loading the suspension. Going up a significant ramp you will let off the gas or briefly brake at the ramp takeoff and then gas up the ramp. It gives you a nice neutral flight path, otherwise you may find yourself nose down upon landing.
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Old 11-23-2013, 02:32 PM
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As far as tires go, use the ones most racers at the track use. They already did the home work for you. Another aspect is to get the jumps down. Letting off the throttle right before the apex usually gives you a nice arc in the flight path. But you also need to learn how to control the pitch just in case the car does wheelie or endo in the air. That'll come second nature as you practice.
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