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When to adjust Camber Links/Roll Center

When to adjust Camber Links/Roll Center

Old 01-17-2012, 11:39 PM
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Default When to adjust Camber Links/Roll Center

So i'm trying to decide when do I need to adjust camber links up or down. For the most part I can dial my car in decently. But I never move the camber links up or down, I guess because I get to comfortable with my current setup. I am trying to take it to the next level so in what scenario will you move it up or down and What is the non scientific feeling on the track. I know Up means less roll center, down means more, but Im trying to translate that too track terms as in how is the car suppose to react and the affect on things like traction corner speed, etc. Thanks in advance. By the way I did search, didn't find what I was looking for.
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Old 01-18-2012, 12:19 AM
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Originally Posted by mcion View Post
So i'm trying to decide when do I need to adjust camber links up or down. For the most part I can dial my car in decently. But I never move the camber links up or down, I guess because I get to comfortable with my current setup. I am trying to take it to the next level so in what scenario will you move it up or down and What is the non scientific feeling on the track. I know Up means less roll center, down means more, but Im trying to translate that too track terms as in how is the car suppose to react and the affect on things like traction corner speed, etc. Thanks in advance. By the way I did search, didn't find what I was looking for.
The higher the camber link the more on-power steering you will have and also makes vechile respond a bit slower to steering input and would be best suited to a high grip smooth track with long fast corners

The lower the camber link is just the oppisite it gives more of-power steering and responds faster to steering input and is best used on track the have lots of corners that need fast direction changes but i always tend to run my camber links down on my truggys as i like more of power steering it made a huge differance with my d8t

Hope that helps
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Old 01-18-2012, 01:36 AM
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A camber link in the lower position on the tower makes the car roll less. This is good for bumpy tracks. The centers itself in the rough sections and it allows you to run a softer spring since the car is rolling less in turn. Of course it does just more than that.

Btw, if you ever read the Hudy offroad setup. The section about roll centers is wrong in the book. It's just the other way around.
Download the Hudy onroad setup book to read more about roll centers. That one is correct.

You can read more about it here: http://home.scarlet.be/~be067749/58/
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Old 01-18-2012, 01:43 AM
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What effect does running the roll centers at different heights front to back have?
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Old 01-18-2012, 01:44 AM
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Click the link I posted and start reading the whole website ;-)
Or just go to setup tips.
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Old 01-18-2012, 01:48 AM
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Originally Posted by morgoth View Post
A camber link in the lower position on the tower makes the car roll less. This is good for bumpy tracks. The centers itself in the rough sections and it allows you to run a softer spring since the car is rolling less in turn. Of course it does just more than that.

Btw, if you ever read the Hudy offroad setup. The section about roll centers is wrong in the book. It's just the other way around.
Download the Hudy onroad setup book to read more about roll centers. That one is correct.

You can read more about it here: http://home.scarlet.be/~be067749/58/
Excellent info in your link, thanks!!!!
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Old 01-18-2012, 02:07 AM
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More direct for 1:8th scale:

http://jq-products.com/the-news/43-t.../160-the-guide
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Old 01-18-2012, 02:51 AM
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Originally Posted by JQ View Post
Nice one! I don't have done a lot of testing with my 1/8 car since the tracks are pretty far away so I usually make small adjustments or adjustments i'm confident with.
But I have a done a lot of testing this winter with my onroad and that's almost exactly what I found out when playing with roll centers. And a car is a car and physics are physics right?
Anyway, when my exames are over at the end of this month (damn you for passing me this guide when I have to study ), I'll take more to go practice in the weekends and see how the adjustments are different on my 1/8 scale.
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Old 01-19-2012, 03:37 AM
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