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what is the best way to test a temp gun?

what is the best way to test a temp gun?

Old 09-01-2009, 08:02 PM
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Default what is the best way to test a temp gun?

to make sure it works? I am not using it as a tunning tool near as much. But i would still like a reliable way of testing it.

Has anyone tried one on boiling water? does it worK
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Old 09-01-2009, 08:22 PM
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cup of ice water should get u close. its 1 way u test a probe or a freezestat in the HVAC industry.

R
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Old 09-01-2009, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by ultegrasti View Post
cup of ice water should get u close. its 1 way u test a probe or a freezestat in the HVAC industry.

R
Wat temp readings are we looking for? Thanks
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Old 09-01-2009, 08:33 PM
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Test it against a Exorgen Temp Gun, they are very reliable and in most respects known as the best!!
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Old 09-01-2009, 11:16 PM
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I don't know if boiling your temp gun would tell you
much. But if you put it in an oven, pre-heated to
450f, it should melt in about five minutes max.
Just kidding! I compare the temp readings of one
of mine with the four others that I own. Three of
them always read within two tenths of a degree
of each other, when pointed down the head of a
running engine. The fourth one reads two degrees
cooler and the fifth one reads four degrees hotter.
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Old 09-01-2009, 11:31 PM
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Originally Posted by rageworks View Post
I don't know if boiling your temp gun would tell you
much. But if you put it in an oven, pre-heated to
450f, it should melt in about five minutes max.
Just kidding! I compare the temp readings of one
of mine with the four others that I own. Three of
them always read within two tenths of a degree
of each other, when pointed down the head of a
running engine. The fourth one reads two degrees
cooler and the fifth one reads four degrees hotter.
Lol, the easiest way is to check the temperature of a pot of boiling water. Water always boils at the same temperature (unless you add salt or are at some extreme elevation) so this is always a constant. Water boils at 100 C. of 212 F so temp it, if your gun reads something else then you know it's off. Just pay attention to how much it is off and just add (or deduct) the difference to/from the number that you get when you temp your engine. This will at least allow you to be some where in the ballpark when you use your gun. Hope this helps!

Regards,

Ron Hopkins
Werks Racing
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Old 09-02-2009, 12:31 AM
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For those of you interested, here is the info off of Exergen's website.

#75 Checking Calibration of IRt/c or D-Series with Boiling Water Exergen's Microscanner D-Series are designed as highly accurate and reliable temperature references as well as fast easy-to-use infrared scanners. Since all components making up a D-Series are drift-free there is never a requirement to calibrate the instrument once it leaves the factory, and no calibration means is provided on the instrument (except certain high temperature models). Accordingly, if the D-Series calibration has shifted from its factory setting, it requires repair since a component has failed. Similarly, non-adjustable IRt/c models are factory calibrated for life, and if they do not reproduce their calibration, they should be considered failed. Unless you have technical experience with and have a laboratory infrared "blackbody," this calibration checking technique is recommended by the factory. Boiling water is a physical constant, easily used, and requires no technical set-up of elaborate equipment or checking of traceable standards.
Boiling Point of Water
The open boiling point of (reasonably pure) water is affected by only one factor: barometric pressure. The standard 212F (100C) boiling point is for a barometric pressure of 30.00 inches of Hg (mercury), or in metric terms, 1 Bar (1000 millibars). This is "normal" at sea level. Barometric pressure can be affected by elevation above sea level, and by weather conditions. Elevation Correction: The boiling point of water is lowered by approximately 2F (1C) for every 1000 ft (300 m) above sea level with no unusual weather conditions. If your weather is "normal" and you are not using the barometric pressure method, you can simply use the following corrections.

Elevation
Boiling Temperature
Sea level 212F 100C
1000 ft (300 meters) 210 99
2000 ft (600m) 208 98
3000 ft (900 m) 206 97
4000 ft (1200 m) 204 96
5000 ft (1500 m) 202 95

Weather Conditions: If you use this method, you do not need to put in a correction for elevation above sea level. It will be automatic by using the current barometric pressure dominating your area. Barometric pressure can be much lower during especially stormy conditions (low pressure areas), and much higher during extremely cool and dry conditions (high pressure areas). Consult the weather reports on TV, in your local newspaper, or call a weather service office for current barometric conditions in your area. Barometric pressure correction factors: 2F / inch Hg (1C / 30 millibars) change from 30.00 in. Hg (1 Bar) Add to the boiling temperature for higher than normal pressure. Subtract for lower than normal pressures. Note: Always clean the sensor lens prior to calibration testing. A cotton swab with a mild cleaner such as alcohol works well. Checking Calibration Required Equipment: Metal pot with cover, minimum 4" (10 cm) tall. Solid paint marker or thin opaque tape.
Use a metal pot, with cover, for boiling water. Fill the pot at least 1/2 fill with water. Use the solid paint marker supplied with your D-Series, or a piece of opaque (non-see through) tape, or a thin electrical tape, to put a measuring spot at least 1in. (25 mm) in diameter on the outside surface of the pot. Make sure the measuring spot is at, or slightly below, the water level. Bring the water to a RAPID boil. Tilt the cover SLIGHTLY so that the water does not boil over. The condensing steam on the inside of the pot along with the rapidly boiling water will force the outside surfaces of the pot to be within a fraction of a degree of the temperature of the boiling water. (The temperature drop through the wall thickness of the average pot for boiling water is very small and can be ignored.) 5. Briefly touch the nosepiece flat onto the black mark and note the temperature reading. For an IRt/c, bring the sensor as close as possible without touching. The reading should be within 2% of the actual boiling point (for example 2C for 100C boiling point). If the reading is not within these limits, the instrument has a failed component and should be returned to Exergen for repair. Please call for an RMA number prior to shipment. For the IRt/c refer to Tech Note No. 73 for specifications.


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Old 09-02-2009, 05:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Joe_Racer View Post
For those of you interested, here is the info off of Exergen's website.

#75 Checking Calibration of IRt/c or D-Series with Boiling Water Exergen's Microscanner D-Series are designed as highly accurate and reliable temperature references as well as fast easy-to-use infrared scanners. Since all components making up a D-Series are drift-free there is never a requirement to calibrate the instrument once it leaves the factory, and no calibration means is provided on the instrument (except certain high temperature models). Accordingly, if the D-Series calibration has shifted from its factory setting, it requires repair since a component has failed. Similarly, non-adjustable IRt/c models are factory calibrated for life, and if they do not reproduce their calibration, they should be considered failed. Unless you have technical experience with and have a laboratory infrared "blackbody," this calibration checking technique is recommended by the factory. Boiling water is a physical constant, easily used, and requires no technical set-up of elaborate equipment or checking of traceable standards.
Boiling Point of Water
The open boiling point of (reasonably pure) water is affected by only one factor: barometric pressure. The standard 212F (100C) boiling point is for a barometric pressure of 30.00 inches of Hg (mercury), or in metric terms, 1 Bar (1000 millibars). This is "normal" at sea level. Barometric pressure can be affected by elevation above sea level, and by weather conditions. Elevation Correction: The boiling point of water is lowered by approximately 2F (1C) for every 1000 ft (300 m) above sea level with no unusual weather conditions. If your weather is "normal" and you are not using the barometric pressure method, you can simply use the following corrections.

Elevation Boiling Temperature
Sea level 212F 100C
1000 ft (300 meters) 210 99
2000 ft (600m) 208 98
3000 ft (900 m) 206 97
4000 ft (1200 m) 204 96
5000 ft (1500 m) 202 95

Weather Conditions: If you use this method, you do not need to put in a correction for elevation above sea level. It will be automatic by using the current barometric pressure dominating your area. Barometric pressure can be much lower during especially stormy conditions (low pressure areas), and much higher during extremely cool and dry conditions (high pressure areas). Consult the weather reports on TV, in your local newspaper, or call a weather service office for current barometric conditions in your area. Barometric pressure correction factors: 2F / inch Hg (1C / 30 millibars) change from 30.00 in. Hg (1 Bar) Add to the boiling temperature for higher than normal pressure. Subtract for lower than normal pressures. Note: Always clean the sensor lens prior to calibration testing. A cotton swab with a mild cleaner such as alcohol works well. Checking Calibration Required Equipment: Metal pot with cover, minimum 4" (10 cm) tall. Solid paint marker or thin opaque tape.
Use a metal pot, with cover, for boiling water. Fill the pot at least 1/2 fill with water. Use the solid paint marker supplied with your D-Series, or a piece of opaque (non-see through) tape, or a thin electrical tape, to put a measuring spot at least 1in. (25 mm) in diameter on the outside surface of the pot. Make sure the measuring spot is at, or slightly below, the water level. Bring the water to a RAPID boil. Tilt the cover SLIGHTLY so that the water does not boil over. The condensing steam on the inside of the pot along with the rapidly boiling water will force the outside surfaces of the pot to be within a fraction of a degree of the temperature of the boiling water. (The temperature drop through the wall thickness of the average pot for boiling water is very small and can be ignored.) 5. Briefly touch the nosepiece flat onto the black mark and note the temperature reading. For an IRt/c, bring the sensor as close as possible without touching. The reading should be within 2% of the actual boiling point (for example 2C for 100C boiling point). If the reading is not within these limits, the instrument has a failed component and should be returned to Exergen for repair. Please call for an RMA number prior to shipment. For the IRt/c refer to Tech Note No. 73 for specifications.


A quick, accurate way to get up-to-the-minute pressure information requires 2 steps (or just 1, if you have the right phone number saved in your cell phone like I do! )

1) call your local airport and ask them for the phone number for AWOS (Ay-woss) (Automated Weather Observation Station)

2) Call the number they give you and listen to the computer-generated voice message. The information you want is "Altimeter setting." That is the air pressure at ground level for the airport. It will say something like "Altimeter setting 29 point 92." (the "real," "standard," "sea level" pressure is 29.92, not 30.00) That is in inches of mercury (Hey, I didn't set the standard...) The normal pressure drop is 1.006 inches of mercury average per 1000 ft below 5000 ft. Call it 1" and you are close enough- it decreases less per 1000 ft the higher you are... but don't worry about it.

Take the setting and subtract it from 29.92, that will give you the pressure difference from the standard sea level setting. (it is technically 29.92 at 59 degrees at sea level for "standard temperature and pressure.)

So... if the "altimeter setting" is 28.92 use the figure in the table for 1000', if it is 27.92 use the figure for 2000', etc. That will get you within a fraction of a degree... use your junior high math to carry it to further accuracy... for example 29.82 would be 100', or .2 difference in the boiling point of water. (2/10ths of a degree!)

See, wasn't that fun?
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Old 09-02-2009, 08:56 AM
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I think I just fried my brain trying to comprehend all of that
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Old 09-02-2009, 09:43 AM
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That makes two of use.
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Old 09-02-2009, 12:32 PM
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Throw that temp gun away

Most of the temp guns out three the cheap one are off by alot. The really good temp guns that are true through out the whole temp range cost alot. Like from 150 + I have one because got tired of cheap temp guns when checking temp vs what the ECM shows in temps. Also doing A/C work take a cheap temp gun stick it front of the outlet it starts to drop in temp reading. Because it effects it's reading making it useless fogs the lense over.
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Old 09-02-2009, 02:25 PM
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simple.... thorw the temp gun in the trash and spit on it....
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Old 09-02-2009, 02:31 PM
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Call me lazy, irresponsible, whatever......bottom of the line is I dont really care about temps, if it feels and sounds right, and I have a decent smoke trail I dont even bother with temps...........use a good grade fuel with a good oil package and let it rip......replace internals with NEW when its time

Last edited by Trevor Williams; 09-02-2009 at 04:13 PM.
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Old 09-02-2009, 04:22 PM
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Dude you are lazy, and irresponsible!
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Old 09-02-2009, 04:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Marshall View Post
Dude you are lazy, and irresponsible!
LMFAO!!
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