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Question for the racers. V. Turn entry.

Question for the racers. V. Turn entry.

Old 04-30-2008, 11:05 PM
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Default Question for the racers. V. Turn entry.

So the big, 'Nitro vs. Electric' threads got me thinking... How do you guys prefer to enter turns? Do you do all of your braking before the turn than roll through the entrance? Or do you like to brake late into the corner and slide the rear around? Or some completely different method?

Personally, I like to finish braking before I start to steer so I don't slide at all. On certain turns I won't even brake and I power slide the whole entrance. However thats rare and I only do it if feels right.
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Old 04-30-2008, 11:44 PM
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Its tuff to say, some turns power slide or drift the turn some power brake in and power out. Off road usually have a mix of methods.

If the traction is high I like to brake early and blip throttle threw and power coming out.
You need a consistent surface to do it the same on every turn. Our track is pretty mixed.
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Old 05-01-2008, 12:50 AM
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Depends on the turn, say your heading into a 180 degree turn, i like to charge in hard grab a handful of brake to get the car to pivot, then slap the throttle wide open and let it slide through the turn.

Guess you could say I steer with the throttle more than the braking ability of the car. I just grab a handful for a second at the end of the straights to dump speed then worry about making the turn. I have tried trail braking off into corners and that just really screws me up.
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Old 05-01-2008, 06:41 AM
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On my local track, I pretty use the same method on every turn except one. At first, I tried to do the same thing every turn to be consistent.. But on one of the chicanes I just started to power slide the entry... I didn't even notice it right away. But hey, it seems to be faster so I'll stick with it

Anyway, I was just curious because people seem to make a big deal about brake bias... so that got me wondering if people are really even using it. I know I don't. I just have my brakes set to not lock and its probably about a 50/50 bias. But since I do all of my braking before the turn it doesn't matter.
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Old 05-01-2008, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Furadi View Post
Anyway, I was just curious because people seem to make a big deal about brake bias... so that got me wondering if people are really even using it. I know I don't. I just have my brakes set to not lock and its probably about a 50/50 bias. But since I do all of my braking before the turn it doesn't matter.
I adjust brake bias frequently. There is not one specific setting which is going to be faster than another. It's just about the feel. I usually run about 40/60 front/rear. That way my buggy brakes a little more like my gas truck so transitioning between the two goes a little more smoothly. Which brake bias you choose may depend on the style of driving you do. If you brake early, then turn, heavy front brake will get you slowed down the fastest without sliding the rear end around. The opposite is also true, late braking sliding into the corners is better with more rear brake.

I find that tracks that have a lot of 180's require the slide in power out method. A technical, twisting track where there are a lot of wide turns and switchbacks can benefit from keeping the back end of the car settled.
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Old 05-01-2008, 12:22 PM
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I definately need to adjust my braking. Not only do the tires lock up, but it seems that one side does it more than the other.... not very fun when youre doing 80 MPH down a gravel road, WOT, and have to stop. You can either slam on the brakes and it slides/twists for about 30 feet, or be real gently on the brakes, and it takes it about 150 feet to stop
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Old 05-01-2008, 03:04 PM
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It really depends on the type of track you run on. Here in Florida most everything is blue-grooved, therefore meaning more traction. When that is the case I usually go up in rear diff oil to help the car rotate on power when in a corner. Allowing me to pick up the throttle much much sooner with out having to sling or pitch the car into a corner.

Now if the track is hard packed and slick I usually run 50/50 brake bias and run up to the corner extremely hard, tap the brakes, allow the car to roll through the corner and I smoothly start rolling into the the throttle to reduce wheel spin.

Then if the track is loamy with good traction then I normally dial most if not all front brake out of the car and use rear brake to help the car rotate in a corner.

I also need to note that I do not run much brake to begin with.
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Old 05-01-2008, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Black View Post
It really depends on the type of track you run on. Here in Florida most everything is blue-grooved, therefore meaning more traction. When that is the case I usually go up in rear diff oil to help the car rotate on power when in a corner. Allowing me to pick up the throttle much much sooner with out having to sling or pitch the car into a corner.

Now if the track is hard packed and slick I usually run 50/50 brake bias and run up to the corner extremely hard, tap the brakes, allow the car to roll through the corner and I smoothly start rolling into the the throttle to reduce wheel spin.

Then if the track is loamy with good traction then I normally dial most if not all front brake out of the car and use rear brake to help the car rotate in a corner.

I also need to note that I do not run much brake to begin with.
Yeah I dont use much brake either, only when i absolutely have to.

What kind of brake setup would you use when youre driving on top of 2 inches of very loose gravel?

What kind of brake pads are the best?
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Old 05-01-2008, 11:12 PM
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Hmm that is a hard one to answer as I have never run on a track with gravel. I would think the gravel is loose so I would run 40/60 front/rear brake bias. As far as brake pads, I always run the stock pads however I have heard a bunch of people really like Craddock brakes.

Hope this helps!
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Old 05-01-2008, 11:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Black View Post
Hmm that is a hard one to answer as I have never run on a track with gravel. I would think the gravel is loose so I would run 40/60 front/rear brake bias. As far as brake pads, I always run the stock pads however I have heard a bunch of people really like Craddock brakes.

Hope this helps!
yes, the gravel is rediculously loose, its not small pebbles, they range from the size of a quarter to the size of a receiver big enough to get jammed in the rim and completely stop that one wheel from spinning.

which of these brake pads is the best?
http://carolinasrc.com/Webstore/Scri...?idproduct=329
http://carolinasrc.com/Webstore/Scri...?idproduct=328
http://carolinasrc.com/Webstore/Scri...idproduct=1037

whats the best kind of brake pads to use? steel? teflon? carbon composite? asbestos?

thanks for the help.
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Old 05-02-2008, 12:33 AM
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The third one you listed is the most common used ones in my area. I don't think you could go wrong with any of them, but go for the third one listed.

I think that the most common used material for brake pads is fiberglass.

I think fiberglass is used mainly because it is more fuel and fade resistant. I know steel can get wet during pitstops and causes some serious brake fade. As far as other materials, I am not quite sure about the other listed materials.
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Old 05-02-2008, 12:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Black View Post
The third one you listed is the most common used ones in my area. I don't think you could go wrong with any of them, but go for the third one listed.

I think that the most common used material for brake pads is fiberglass.

I think fiberglass is used mainly because it is more fuel and fade resistant. I know steel can get wet during pitstops and causes some serious brake fade. As far as other materials, I am not quite sure about the other listed materials.
allright, awesome. thanks for the help.
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