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DROOP,,,what is it ghow to adjust

DROOP,,,what is it ghow to adjust

Old 11-16-2007, 07:18 AM
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Default DROOP,,,what is it ghow to adjust

can someone please tell us what droop is and how to adjust i read its the amount your chassis lifts after rebound ,,but how do you adjust that ,,someone at track told me to reduce droop on my car but i dont know how ?
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Old 11-16-2007, 07:38 AM
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their are set screws on the inside of suspension arms(near hinge pin) that alter the droop settings, I havent quite figured it out either to a tee myself so I will be reading up on this thread.

Last edited by pwnzor; 11-16-2007 at 09:34 AM.
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Old 11-16-2007, 07:47 AM
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Droop is the measurement of how far the suspension travels down, and will travel below the chassis. Mugen MBX5(r) are measured with a rim under the chassis front and rear and measure the clearance at the bottom of the hub/knuckle to the table it sits on. Others sometime don;t use the droop screws and let the suspension limit itself on the shocks travel. When using this method, this is where you have to make sure your left and right shocks were assembled the same lengths, or you will have more droop on one side than the other. Mugen calls the "droop" rebound stop on their setting sheets.
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Old 11-16-2007, 08:10 AM
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Originally Posted by ezveedub View Post
Droop is the measurement of how far the suspension travels down, and will travel below the chassis. Mugen MBX5(r) are measured with a rim under the chassis front and rear and measure the clearance at the bottom of the hub/knuckle to the table it sits on. Others sometime don;t use the droop screws and let the suspension limit itself on the shocks travel. When using this method, this is where you have to make sure your left and right shocks were assembled the same lengths, or you will have more droop on one side than the other. Mugen calls the "droop" rebound stop on their setting sheets.
ahhhh, ok.......cool.....so I just need a couple wheels(or something similar/flat/even front to back to prop car on) then make my measurements from bottom of hub carrier to surface.........simple enough LOL

I guess if using wheels to set car on to take measurements, you need to kinda make sure the prop wheels arent touching/interfering with suspension arms, I can see people doing it now lmao
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Old 11-16-2007, 08:45 AM
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When I was running the Losi buggy, I measured droop by measuring the extended shock length from the center of the lower mounting bolt to the center of the upper mounting bolt, while the shock is mounted on the car. I believe this is the way the team setup sheets are measuring as well. To me this is the simplest, most accurate, and most repeatable way to measure droop.

The downside to this is that if you change mounting locations, this will change your droop unless you measure before and after using the Hudy droop guages or something similar. Most of the time with the Losi you use the same shock mounting locations so it wasnt too much of an issue.

In a nut shell, more rear droop/downtravel will give you more steering off power by allow the rear of the car to raise up more and transfer more weight to the front wheels. More front droop/downtravel gives less on power steering/more rear traction by allowing the front end to raise up more on power and transfer more weight to the rear wheels.

As far as rough tracks, some like more down travel and some like less. IT depends on the shape of the bumps and where they are. I usually take travel out of the car for short choppy bumps so the car can skip over the top of them. For bigger whoop-type bumps, I run more downtravel to keep the wheels in contact with track more.

If you are having problems with the car flipping over while trying to turn with bumps and ruts in the corner, take travel out.
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Old 11-16-2007, 02:55 PM
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some of this stuff is confusing to me to I just try to break it down to weight transfer like this

Less travel = less weight transfer(turn droop screw IN)

More travel = more weight transfer (turn droop screw out )

so think of you droop screws as travel limiter just like putting washers inside the shocks

for example (less travel droop screw IN) the front will keep more weight on the front tires and should give it more on power steering and less rear traction because the front will not allow as much weight to transfer to the rear tires

(more travel droop screw OUT) in the rear will give the car more off power steering
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Old 02-13-2008, 01:01 PM
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It's very interesting what you said about traction rolling (when you r car flips over in a curve, due to excessive side traction).

Many times, when trying to avoid this, you find that you don't want to chage tires, and start fiddling arround with the differentials, suspension or stabilizer bars. The most simple and effective way to avoid traction rolling is to give the car less droop (turn the down stop screws in).

Of course, you have to keep in mind the other effects this has on car handling: it's not a good solution if the stack is very bumpy or has big jumps...in this case , you may want to keep some droop and use softer suspenson combined with thicker stabilizer bars. This in turn may affect the cars steering, so you might have to readjust front caster / toe/ ackermann....

...and so on and so forth, till you find a balanced combination!!

My advice so you wont go nuts: find a "standard" setup that works good for you, and just change tires and make some small adjustments at each track.

Remember: driving (practice) is the most valuable "adjustment" you can do to your setup!!! Know how remember the pros can make even a very wrongly adjusted car go fast?? Why?? Apart of natural talent, it's hours and hours of practice. Lucky dawgs!!!
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Old 12-09-2016, 10:57 AM
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Default What are droop screws?

I just built one of the Team Associated AE RC8b3e buggies and had some difficulty finding information on "droop screws".

I figure I would post here since I had a really hard time finding the answer that ended up being soooooo easy.

The manual called for droop screws (part # 89317) to be installed on each arm, but did not list specifications, and the scew was not on Page 3 reference guide.

I searched and did not find much info, even Associated's website had very little info and no size or length listed.

I called support, and they could not tell me the bag or provide a size etc.

One call to my brother and the mystery was solved......

These particular droop screws have a button head with a 2.0mm hex, and on the other side have a hex opening as well making them very unique.

The reason for this is so you can use the button head to drive the screw, and the button head rests on the chassis, but the other end is used to adjust the screw.

Just had to post this in case it helps someone else.


Last edited by The Devil; 12-09-2016 at 11:04 AM. Reason: Adding photo
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Old 12-10-2016, 03:10 AM
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Have a read of the general 1/8 Buggy guide by JQ, part 7 down the page a bit is about down travel & setting it. Read all the guide, its some good info.

http://stories.jqracing.com/the-guide/
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