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MIP Bypass1 pistons for 1/8th scale

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MIP Bypass1 pistons for 1/8th scale

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Old 08-01-2019, 05:02 AM
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Default MIP Bypass1 pistons for 1/8th scale

MIP released their Bypass1 pistons a while ago for Mugen and Associated, but since a few weeks they are also available for other brands.
I'm interested in them, but they are pretty expensive over here, so I'd like to hear some reviews before I buy a set.

Please let us know how they changed the car for you. Thanks!
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Old 08-02-2019, 03:13 AM
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If you donít mind, Iíd like to piggy back on this thread. I havenít seen another one started for these. I also had a question. Are you supposed to build these new Bypass pistons using emulsion style, vented or not? Or maybe it doesnít matter? Just curious as to what the intended shock build is for these new Bypass shock systems. Thanks all.
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Old 08-02-2019, 04:52 AM
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Originally Posted by xlrsd View Post
If you donít mind, Iíd like to piggy back on this thread. I havenít seen another one started for these. I also had a question. Are you supposed to build these new Bypass pistons using emulsion style, vented or not? Or maybe it doesnít matter? Just curious as to what the intended shock build is for these new Bypass shock systems. Thanks all.
It doesn't matter what style of shocks you use. They are normal pistons, but when the are moving out (rebound) the valve opens and it allows for faster rebound.
So basically you tune the compression ratio as you used to with shock oils and with the valves, you can speed up the rebound. This should give you a more responsive car with more grip in theory, but that's just theory.
I wonder what the experiences are of people that tried them in their cars.
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Old 08-03-2019, 04:30 AM
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Originally Posted by morgoth View Post
It doesn't matter what style of shocks you use. They are normal pistons, but when the are moving out (rebound) the valve opens and it allows for faster rebound.
So basically you tune the compression ratio as you used to with shock oils and with the valves, you can speed up the rebound. This should give you a more responsive car with more grip in theory, but that's just theory.
I wonder what the experiences are of people that tried them in their cars.
ok, so they can be used with emulsion or bladder. I just didnít know what more people were doing these days. Iím surprised you donít hear more talk on these pistons, as they were suppose to change the hobby. Haha
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Old 08-03-2019, 04:53 AM
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I did start this post back in March MIP Bypass Pistons

Iíve been using the Bypass pistons in my HB D819 and have, along with the Performa bladders, noticed a huge improvement when racing. I find Iím able to push the buggy harder when cornering and it soaks up the ruts and bumps around the tracks I race at.

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Old 08-03-2019, 05:59 AM
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Thatís what Iím saying! You started that thread back in March, and NO ONE else posted on it. Same with this one. Crickets. I guess no one runs these really, or have an opinion, or both. Lol
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Old 08-03-2019, 08:37 AM
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I'm running these on a large outdoor very rutted track, and have noticed an increase of consistency in my lap times, and increased traction. They also help the car spring off the jumps a bit better. I think people are running them, but not wanting to expose the edge they give them. lol. I ran them on a smooth track, at a bigger race, and actually gained too much traction. I had to run tires that didnt hook up as well to free the car up in corners. Locally, I've TQ'd, and lapped the field with the setup posted below, results do matter to me. Cheers!

Front:
6 holes, (drilled out to 1.35), running BLUE washers @ 90+deg outside air, Track temp 102+deg, 600 CST Hudy oil

Rear:
6 holes, (drilled out to 1.35), running GREEN washers @ 90+deg outside air, Track temp 102+deg, 500 CST Hudy oil
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Old 08-03-2019, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by TheWorstDriver View Post
I'm running these on a large outdoor very rutted track, and have noticed an increase of consistency in my lap times, and increased traction. They also help the car spring off the jumps a bit better. I think people are running them, but not wanting to expose the edge they give them. lol. I ran them on a smooth track, at a bigger race, and actually gained too much traction. I had to run tires that didnt hook up as well to free the car up in corners. Locally, I've TQ'd, and lapped the field with the setup posted below, results do matter to me. Cheers!

Front:
6 holes, (drilled out to 1.35), running BLUE washers @ 90+deg outside air, Track temp 102+deg, 600 CST Hudy oil

Rear:
6 holes, (drilled out to 1.35), running GREEN washers @ 90+deg outside air, Track temp 102+deg, 500 CST Hudy oil
Thanks for the info, worstdriver! Thatís what Iím hoping to get out of them myself! It seems that what they are made to do makes a lot of sense, and just by looking at the physics involved in them alone, they MUST help. Your track also sounds pretty similar to my local track, so I think Iím gonna give your setup a try! Couple questions in regards to your setup: do you know what those Hudy oil weights are compared to Losi oils? Thatís what I run. Also, do you run emulsion with that setup, or bladder?
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Old 08-03-2019, 04:03 PM
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Drake and Maifield have them listed on their setup sheets.
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Old 08-03-2019, 08:36 PM
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It looks like most Iíve seen listed on pro setup sheets, when they are, are using emulsion.
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Old 08-04-2019, 11:31 AM
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I have a set that I won in their giveaway. I would like to try them out in my T3 but don’t know which bladder to start out with.
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Old 08-04-2019, 05:48 PM
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These sound similar to the VRP pistons. I wonder how they compare in practice.
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Old 08-05-2019, 12:15 AM
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Originally Posted by TheWorstDriver View Post
I ran them on a smooth track, at a bigger race, and actually gained too much traction.
That's maybe one of the reasons why they aren't popular in Europe.
We have a lot of high speed tracks with good grip or multisurface tracks (with super high grip astro in it). I think the slower rebound of the stock pistons calm down the car and make it easier to drive in these conditions.
While the MIP pistons are probably good on low traction or blown out tracks.
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Old 08-05-2019, 12:30 AM
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So when guys installs these on their kits, what is a good start point? Do you keep the same weights of oil that you were running for track conditions in non-Bypass pistons? Is there a ďneutralĒ oil weight to start with for Bypass pistons? And also with the different thickness gaskets, is there something you are supposed to START with so you donít throw your shock set up so far out of wack changing from non-Bypass, to Bypass?
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Old 08-05-2019, 01:14 AM
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Originally Posted by xlrsd View Post
So when guys installs these on their kits, what is a good start point? Do you keep the same weights of oil that you were running for track conditions in non-Bypass pistons? Is there a ďneutralĒ oil weight to start with for Bypass pistons? And also with the different thickness gaskets, is there something you are supposed to START with so you donít throw your shock set up so far out of wack changing from non-Bypass, to Bypass?
Start with the size of holes and oils as in your normal shock setup is the recommendation from Adam Drake. He runs the clear valve in the front and blue in rear as a base setup.
And blue in the front/green in the rear if it's really blown out or loose.
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