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Bleeders for Mini-T Aluminum shocks

Bleeders for Mini-T Aluminum shocks

Old 01-31-2009, 10:29 AM
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Default Bleeders for Mini-T Aluminum shocks

I modified some Mini-T aluminum shocks to add bleeders like on the slider shocks. Here's a pic of the shock bodies:



I use these along with my cartridge/shock body o-ring seals to get the shocks built nicely with no leaks:



Here's a pic of one of them mounted on my slider:

http://s92437987.onlinehome.us/ebayp...nted-shock.jpg

and a pic of a shock body mounted in the milling machine to be drilled for the bleeder:

http://s92437987.onlinehome.us/ebayp...ling-shock.jpg
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Old 01-31-2009, 10:41 AM
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nice work, especially the polishing of the shock bodies
but I have never had a leakage problem using two of the included plastic seals
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Old 01-31-2009, 03:52 PM
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As long as you only removed and polished the outside. That coat covering actually has some chemicals in it to reduce friction on the piston to make the shock act more consistent.
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Old 01-31-2009, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by oXYnary View Post
As long as you only removed and polished the outside. That coat covering actually has some chemicals in it to reduce friction on the piston to make the shock act more consistent.
never heard that before
and wouldn't that coating rub off rather quickly
with the pistons sliding up and down repeatedly?
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Old 02-01-2009, 12:11 AM
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Originally Posted by RobbieT View Post
never heard that before
and wouldn't that coating rub off rather quickly
with the pistons sliding up and down repeatedly?

Thats why its a hard coating. And yes, it does eventually wear away (hence when a racer buys new ones, though shouldn't happen very often if shocks taken care off/rebuilt enough). Im pretty sure those are teflon coated like the AE ones as well since they had that grey/green sheen to them. I dont know how AE is doing it these days since their FT shocks seem to be blue. But anyhoo, separate topic.
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Old 02-01-2009, 05:38 AM
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Originally Posted by oXYnary View Post
Thats why its a hard coating. And yes, it does eventually wear away (hence when a racer buys new ones, though shouldn't happen very often if shocks taken care off/rebuilt enough). Im pretty sure those are teflon coated like the AE ones as well since they had that grey/green sheen to them. I dont know how AE is doing it these days since their FT shocks seem to be blue. But anyhoo, separate topic.
Actually Associateds hard anodized FT shocks are still the darker gray color like those that come with the TC5 or T4/B4 FT kits. The blue shocks are only in the RTR or team truck and buggy kits.
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Old 02-01-2009, 07:25 AM
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Originally Posted by RobbieT View Post
nice work, especially the polishing of the shock bodies
but I have never had a leakage problem using two of the included plastic seals
Actually, the shocks in the pic are the dynamite clear anodized ones. They were cheap, so I figured I'd try those before hacking away at my anodized shock bodies.

The standard plastic seals last one or two rebuilds for me then don't seal as well so I went with the O-rings.
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Old 02-01-2009, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by ta_man View Post
Actually, the shocks in the pic are the dynamite clear anodized ones. They were cheap, so I figured I'd try those before hacking away at my anodized shock bodies.

The standard plastic seals last one or two rebuilds for me then don't seal as well so I went with the O-rings.
okay, another question. with the screws that long isn't there a risk of the pistons hitting them when bottoming out the shock?
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Old 02-01-2009, 04:16 PM
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Nice work! I wish I had a mill like that!


not directly related, but the coating commonly used on motorcycles and mt. bike suspension is a titanium/nitride coating, used to reduce friction and promote durability. I highly doubt this process is used on Losi shocks though, due to the immense cost involved....
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Old 02-01-2009, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by ShredSLED View Post
Nice work! I wish I had a mill like that!


not directly related, but the coating commonly used on motorcycles and mt. bike suspension is a titanium/nitride coating, used to reduce friction and promote durability. I highly doubt this process is used on Losi shocks though, due to the immense cost involved....

They do have Ti Nitride shock shafts, http://www.amainhobbies.com/product_...ducts_id/15463 Associated has switched to this as well over their unobtanium coating they used to use. Both Losi and Associated are pretty big companies
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Old 02-01-2009, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by trerc View Post
They do have Ti Nitride shock shafts, http://www.amainhobbies.com/product_...ducts_id/15463 Associated has switched to this as well over their unobtanium coating they used to use. Both Losi and Associated are pretty big companies
Oh wow, very cool! Haven't seen that yet before in R/C.
I guess I underestimate though, haha.

I know on a set of Marzocchi triple clamp DH forks for an MTB, the Ti-Ni coating is typically a few hundo as an upgrade, even more on MX, sometimes only reserved to factory works bikes.
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Old 02-01-2009, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by ShredSLED View Post
Nice work! I wish I had a mill like that!


not directly related, but the coating commonly used on motorcycles and mt. bike suspension is a titanium/nitride coating, used to reduce friction and promote durability. I highly doubt this process is used on Losi shocks though, due to the immense cost involved....
the shock shafts, yes
the inside of the shocks, no
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