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Old 01-17-2006, 11:10 AM   #1
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i know this is not related to this forum BUT will stainless steel screws be lighter than mild steel im thinking about changing all my screws at least the heads wont wear & strip
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Old 01-17-2006, 02:48 PM   #2
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Why steel? Most companies offers complete titanium kits for cars.
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Old 01-17-2006, 02:51 PM   #3
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You can get stainless far cheaper than titanium
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Old 01-17-2006, 04:08 PM   #4
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Not sure in the difference between the two but I cannot image that one would weight so much more that it would actually make a difference. If I were choosing steel screws, I would always run stainless.
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Old 01-17-2006, 04:26 PM   #5
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Going for bling? Get aluminum, the color of your choice. Titanium is best. Stainless is a weak metal, and will always fail. Ask any machinist. Worst metal for fasteners.
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Old 01-17-2006, 04:28 PM   #6
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I was told not to use stainless screws for mounting motors.
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Old 01-17-2006, 04:46 PM   #7
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Never use stainless steel screws on application like on you motor, Or any car that uses aluminum bulk head co'z they bind together, You will strip the screws. Titanium is the best way to go it's a beat expensive but it's worth the money.
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Old 01-17-2006, 04:52 PM   #8
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Also, stainless steel screws retain heat unlike steel.

Not good to use in R/C.

You can buy aluminum, the color of your choice here for 1/4 of the cost : (not to be used as motor screws but everywhere else)

http://www.fastener-express.com/inde...S&Category=218
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Old 01-17-2006, 04:55 PM   #9
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Two billets of equal size, one SS and one mild(say 1018), the SS billet will weigh more. Stainless is an abrasive metal, but not a hard metal, though some grades of stainless are very strong, they are heavier than Ti and only cost a little less. Aluminum sucks for shear strength, so anything that may shear, like bulkheads, should get steel or SS or Ti. SS will bond itself to some dissimilar metals by a process called Bi-metallic welding, which is a chemical bond due to interaction of non-compatible compounds in the two metals. In fact, all metals will do so to a point, some just less than others. Bi-metallic welding can be avoided, use oil on the threads, or a threadlock will work too, just so long as there is something to shield the metals from each other.
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Old 01-17-2006, 04:56 PM   #10
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I have run titanium screws before but I just don't see the point,considering how expenisve they are, especially with cars already underweight. In theory, the best place to add weight is at the lowest point possible -- the underside of your chassis.

I use stainless screws and have never had issues with binding or stripping.
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Old 01-17-2006, 05:10 PM   #11
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I'd use plastic screws before I'd ever us aluminum ones again. Aluminum screws strip out, break off and as far as I'm concerned, are just plain junk!
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Old 01-17-2006, 05:20 PM   #12
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Stainless is heavier than carbon steel. Carbon steel has a density of .283 (lb/cubic in.) and stainless is around .289.

The only advantage I see is that the stainless is less likely to rust...
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Old 01-17-2006, 05:40 PM   #13
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I would run stainless in most area's before aluminum screws. Where the stainless and alu meet, don't use them. But I would use carbon stell everywhere on the bottom of the chassis and aluminum screws everywhere that isn't a high stress area. Ti screws arelright but I wouldn't use them in any high use area's, like motor screws. Titanium wears out pretty quickly from friction. The more often you use the screws, the faster they wear out. That goes for all screws but Ti ones will wear out quicker. When I used to mountain bike I saw a few ti bikes with holes worn in them from the brake cable rubbing the frame.
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Old 01-17-2006, 06:19 PM   #14
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Titanium is one of the hardest metal known. I don't see it will wear out quicker like you said just an opinion.
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Old 01-17-2006, 06:30 PM   #15
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Maybe it was just the grade but I know I have seen bikes with holes in them from the cables. I do know it's hard to work with as well. Personally, I don't trust titanium in high stress area's either. arbon steel or nothing for that.
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