Go Back  R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road
Tamiya Euro Truck Class >

Tamiya Euro Truck Class

Like Tree868Likes

Tamiya Euro Truck Class

Old 01-08-2023, 02:38 PM
  #1621  
Tech Initiate
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Newman Ca
Posts: 22
Default

Originally Posted by Silverbullet555
I'm sure they add a little speed. I can't justify the cost on this class though. It's for fun and I like not having to do much to the car. Oil the bushings, check some screws, send it!
SilverBullett, so are you running with just the bushings and not having any issues? ive read where others have had some big issues. Oiling makes a lot of sense, thanks for the response.

gigaplex likes this.
Ken95360 is offline  
Old 01-08-2023, 04:07 PM
  #1622  
Tech Champion
iTrader: (2)
 
gigaplex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Melbourne, VIC
Posts: 6,429
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

You really should be using bearings instead of bushings. Cheap ones are fine, ceramic have diminishing returns and cost more than the car is worth.
SteveM, DirkW and Ken95360 like this.
gigaplex is online now  
Old 01-09-2023, 01:12 PM
  #1623  
Tech Elite
iTrader: (20)
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Beavercreek
Posts: 2,194
Trader Rating: 20 (100%+)
Default

Not to mention, worn bushings can and will eventually lead to premature wear of other parts. Oil and grease will pick up debris which will act as lapping compound and not only wear the bushings faster, but may impact your gears. Bearing kits are around $24. Reduced friction, more precise fit, parts longevity are well worth the investment.
angrymelon and Ken95360 like this.
Sorcerer001 is offline  
Old 01-09-2023, 01:34 PM
  #1624  
Tech Elite
iTrader: (9)
 
IndyRC_Racer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 2,357
Trader Rating: 9 (100%+)
Default

To add what others have said about bearings in the Euro Truck class, you DO NOT have to use Tamiya brand bearings to be US TCS legal. There are many TT-02 bearing kits available thru local or online hobby stores or onlne shopping websites

I would advise anyone who uses Amazon to buy parts for Tamiya vehicles to confirm who the seller is and how long shipping is estimated to take. There are many Tamiya parts sellers based in Japan. Some of those sellers will have their shipments fulfilled by Amazon so it will arrive quickly. Others may ship through Japan post and it may take much longer. Although I haven't had any issues getting my parts through Japan post delivered thru US Post Office to a continental US address.

Right now I can get Tamiya #54476 TT-02 bearings through Amazon Prime delivered by Wednesday for around $23 USD (but your delivery time might vary).
Ken95360 and 94SRUNNER like this.
IndyRC_Racer is offline  
Old 01-09-2023, 08:20 PM
  #1625  
Tech Master
iTrader: (13)
 
TonysScrews's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Central NJ
Posts: 1,813
Trader Rating: 13 (100%+)
Default

Most bearing kits do not include the (4) bearings in the bell cranks. Make sure your kit has these or order them separately. You will need (4) 5mm x 8mm x 2.5mm bearings. I get all my bearings from AvidRC.com. Their Aura bearings are great. Metal shield on one shield, rubber on the other and they have oil instead of grease.
IndyRC_Racer and Ken95360 like this.
TonysScrews is offline  
Old 01-10-2023, 06:05 AM
  #1626  
Tech Master
iTrader: (16)
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Idaho
Posts: 1,846
Trader Rating: 16 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by Ken95360
SilverBullett, so are you running with just the bushings and not having any issues? ive read where others have had some big issues. Oiling makes a lot of sense, thanks for the response.
I'm using metal ball bearings. No maintenance month to month (we run monthly) and big improvement over bushings.

It's the only upgrade allowed here outside the servo saver.
Ken95360 likes this.
Silverbullet555 is offline  
Old 01-10-2023, 06:07 AM
  #1627  
Tech Master
iTrader: (16)
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Idaho
Posts: 1,846
Trader Rating: 16 (100%+)
Default

Getting things going in Boise, Idaho. About 15 trucks after just two onroad day/oval days have been added to the local fleet. Working to get the other trucks off the shelf. Local shop sells a couple each day we hold onroad and oval.


https://fb.watch/hZaDVwKIRZ/

https://fb.watch/hZaGrEqe-j/



Silverbullet555 is offline  
Old 01-10-2023, 02:22 PM
  #1628  
Tech Master
iTrader: (45)
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,678
Trader Rating: 45 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by Silverbullet555
I'm using metal ball bearings. No maintenance month to month (we run monthly) and big improvement over bushings.

It's the only upgrade allowed here outside the servo saver.
I am using Fast Eddy bearings in my Euro truck. Working fine so far.
IndyRC_Racer likes this.
jammin684 is offline  
Old 01-11-2023, 05:25 PM
  #1629  
Tech Fanatic
iTrader: (26)
 
GerryH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 940
Trader Rating: 26 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by Ken95360
i see the ceramic bearings are twice as much as the steel bearings. anyone running them and do they notice an improvement over the steel?
The guys that race competitively in the TCS races use them, since they take advantage of every little thing that's allowed.
GerryH is offline  
Old 01-11-2023, 05:51 PM
  #1630  
Tech Master
iTrader: (45)
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,678
Trader Rating: 45 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by GerryH
The guys that race competitively in the TCS races use them, since they take advantage of every little thing that's allowed.
I think I would just stay with a steel bearing. I chose Fast Eddy. Remember this is a Spec Class. It is intended for FUN. You are going to get beat on in a race, but it is a class that really is a great time. You don't need ceramic.
JeepPower likes this.
jammin684 is offline  
Old 01-18-2023, 10:09 PM
  #1631  
Regional Moderator
iTrader: (1)
 
disaster999's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 4,012
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

There was a Euro truck race this past weekend and people were at the local track practicing, I thought I would take my truck out as well to run a few laps with the lads and have some fun. One thing VERY clear was that my truck was noticeable slower than the rest. I was getting passed on the straights like I was standing still. We were scratching out heads trying to figure it out but no one had a clear answer. We could only conclude my motor is probably old and worn. I could probably try and swap motor with someone else to see if the theory is correct, but other than that, anyone have a clue why there might be such a huge performance difference between the stock torque tuned motor?
disaster999 is offline  
Old 01-18-2023, 11:27 PM
  #1632  
Tech Master
iTrader: (13)
 
TonysScrews's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Central NJ
Posts: 1,813
Trader Rating: 13 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by disaster999
There was a Euro truck race this past weekend and people were at the local track practicing, I thought I would take my truck out as well to run a few laps with the lads and have some fun. One thing VERY clear was that my truck was noticeable slower than the rest. I was getting passed on the straights like I was standing still. We were scratching out heads trying to figure it out but no one had a clear answer. We could only conclude my motor is probably old and worn. I could probably try and swap motor with someone else to see if the theory is correct, but other than that, anyone have a clue why there might be such a huge performance difference between the stock torque tuned motor?
NOTE: *** Assuming their trucks are TCS legal and not running different motor, gearing or batteries ***

Since we just discussed it above, does your truck have bearings in it? If not, get a set of bearings and ditch the bushings.

Make sure your ESC is calibrated to your radio so you are getting full throttle.

Have you cleaned and re-oiled the motor?

If not, remove the motor and spray it with motor spray (electronic contact cleaner). Blow it out dry with compressed air (or let it dry). Then oil both ends with a fine bushing oil.

You can also look thru the openings to see if there is any material left on the brushes. If they are all worn down and/or the comm looks beat to crap, its shot.

You can buy a stock new TorqueTuned, or go to KHD and buy an already broken in and dynoed motor. KHD also sells comm drops, comm cleaner and oil.

What battery are you running? Ni-Mh or LiPO? Best legal Li-Po for these trucks is the ProTek RC 100C Li-HV Packs round hard-cased packs.

Finally, if you added silicone to the front and rear diffs, there's a good chance it leaked out the out-drives and soaked your ring & pinion gears as wells as the large 8x12x3.5mm bearings one each side of the diff and the 5x11x4mm bearings on the pinion gear shafts. This will slow down the truck. Remove the front and rear diffs and clean the ring & pinion gear of any silicone oil (or Tamiya Anti-Wear grease if you used that inside the diff). The ring & pinion should only have a light coating of a thin grease. Then remove the seals on the bearings and toss the bearings into an ultra-sonic cleaner. Use a mild cleaner like the Zep Citrus cleaner from Home Depot (one gallon jug will last you years). Gently blow the bearings dry with compressed air and then add 1-2 drops of bearing oil. Replace the seals and re-install. Your truck should roll very freely. You can do the same procedure on the 5x11x4mm bearings on the four axle shafts too. Most bearings have grease in them so while they will last longer, they don't spin anywhere near as free as oiled bearings. And do NOT use brake cleaner or the electric contact cleaner to clean the bearings. It'll ruin them. Use the ZEP citrus cleaner.

For the front & rear diffs, just coat the small bevel gears in the rear diff with Tamiya anti-wear grease. In the front diff put 1,000,000 or up to 2,000,000 silicone diff oil inside the diff FlashPoint 1m Silicone Diff Oil

Do this maintenance and slap a KHD TorqueTuned in your truck with the ProTek RC LiPo and you'll be whizzing by your buddies next time out...LOL
R Doyel and 94SRUNNER like this.

Last edited by TonysScrews; 01-18-2023 at 11:48 PM.
TonysScrews is offline  
Old 01-19-2023, 12:15 AM
  #1633  
Regional Moderator
iTrader: (1)
 
disaster999's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 4,012
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by TonysScrews
NOTE: *** Assuming their trucks are TCS legal and not running different motor, gearing or batteries ***

Since we just discussed it above, does your truck have bearings in it? If not, get a set of bearings and ditch the bushings.

Make sure your ESC is calibrated to your radio so you are getting full throttle.

Have you cleaned and re-oiled the motor?

If not, remove the motor and spray it with motor spray (electronic contact cleaner). Blow it out dry with compressed air (or let it dry). Then oil both ends with a fine bushing oil.

You can also look thru the openings to see if there is any material left on the brushes. If they are all worn down and/or the comm looks beat to crap, its shot.

You can buy a stock new TorqueTuned, or go to KHD and buy an already broken in and dynoed motor. KHD also sells comm drops, comm cleaner and oil.

What battery are you running? Ni-Mh or LiPO? Best legal Li-Po for these trucks is the ProTek RC 100C Li-HV Packs round hard-cased packs.

Finally, if you added silicone to the front and rear diffs, there's a good chance it leaked out the out-drives and soaked your ring & pinion gears as wells as the large 8x12x3.5mm bearings one each side of the diff and the 5x11x4mm bearings on the pinion gear shafts. This will slow down the truck. Remove the front and rear diffs and clean the ring & pinion gear of any silicone oil (or Tamiya Anti-Wear grease if you used that inside the diff). The ring & pinion should only have a light coating of a thin grease. Then remove the seals on the bearings and toss the bearings into an ultra-sonic cleaner. Use a mild cleaner like the Zep Citrus cleaner from Home Depot (one gallon jug will last you years). Gently blow the bearings dry with compressed air and then add 1-2 drops of bearing oil. Replace the seals and re-install. Your truck should roll very freely. You can do the same procedure on the 5x11x4mm bearings on the four axle shafts too. Most bearings have grease in them so while they will last longer, they don't spin anywhere near as free as oiled bearings. And do NOT use brake cleaner or the electric contact cleaner to clean the bearings. It'll ruin them. Use the ZEP citrus cleaner.

For the front & rear diffs, just coat the small bevel gears in the rear diff with Tamiya anti-wear grease. In the front diff put 1,000,000 or up to 2,000,000 silicone diff oil inside the diff FlashPoint 1m Silicone Diff Oil

Do this maintenance and slap a KHD TorqueTuned in your truck with the ProTek RC LiPo and you'll be whizzing by your buddies next time out...LOL
Truck is running full bearing, lipo batteries, esc fully calibrated. Truck rolls very freely currently. Im using putty on the front diff, rear diff I've packed it with the supplied grease but it is pretty much open diff right now.

I have not cleaned or oiled the motor which I will try and clean it and see if that makes a difference. Im sure that might be the culprit to my lack of speed
​​​​​
disaster999 is offline  
Old 01-19-2023, 12:41 AM
  #1634  
Tech Fanatic
iTrader: (1)
 
gwhiz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 977
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Lightbulb

Originally Posted by TonysScrews
... do NOT use brake cleaner or the electric contact cleaner to clean the bearings. It'll ruin them.
Respectfully, how?
gwhiz is offline  
Old 01-19-2023, 05:21 AM
  #1635  
Tech Champion
iTrader: (2)
 
gigaplex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Melbourne, VIC
Posts: 6,429
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by disaster999
There was a Euro truck race this past weekend and people were at the local track practicing, I thought I would take my truck out as well to run a few laps with the lads and have some fun. One thing VERY clear was that my truck was noticeable slower than the rest. I was getting passed on the straights like I was standing still. We were scratching out heads trying to figure it out but no one had a clear answer. We could only conclude my motor is probably old and worn. I could probably try and swap motor with someone else to see if the theory is correct, but other than that, anyone have a clue why there might be such a huge performance difference between the stock torque tuned motor?
Brushed motors have always had that problem, especially dirt cheap ones. Manufacturing tolerances play a big part, as does the break in procedure. The brushes do wear so the motor will not be as consistent as a brushless motor through its usable life.
gigaplex is online now  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.