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Favorite F1 Cars

Old 04-19-2015, 06:25 PM
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I have a 3Racing FGX and i love it. It's a great value and replacement parts are extremely cheap. I run it against many Tamiya's and Xrays and have no problem keeping up if not making them play catch up with me!
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Old 04-19-2015, 07:27 PM
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Over at the race tracks down here, the FGX gets lapped.....multiple times.
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Old 04-19-2015, 07:42 PM
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Dan, I think that is the difference. You run on a track. Running in an unprepped parking lot will even out everything.
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Old 04-19-2015, 07:52 PM
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Exactly the point I was getting at.
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Old 04-19-2015, 08:42 PM
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l know.
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Old 04-19-2015, 10:01 PM
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Most of the cars work well but there are certain design aspects that work better than others in certain conditions. In my experience flex plate and even more so t-plate suspension is smoother over bumps and tends to carry more speed through high speed sections. link cars are generally quicker through technical sections with better forward bite. Most of the block front ends I have tried are better mid corner but loose out to link front ends on exit. If you plan to mainly run on carpet a link car will be best, if you will race predominantly on more open or bumpy asphalt tracks go with a t-bar.

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Old 04-20-2015, 02:26 AM
  #22  
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Now i'm racing with the WRC f-one and i realy like it.
Before i had a VBC, and that car needed more work to find a good setup. Out off the box i was already more pleased with the car compared to the VBC.
It al just comes down to a personal choise. Al the car can be fast if you give them to the right person.
Best would be if you can drive a time with the cars.
Everyone has his personal choise, just look what your local shop and local drivers drive with.
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Old 04-20-2015, 07:25 AM
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Originally Posted by mtveten
If you plan to mainly run on carpet a link car will be best, if you will race predominantly on more open or bumpy asphalt tracks go with a t-bar.
That's weird, I've always thought that due to the range of motion a link suspension provides, that it'd be more suited to bumpy tracks. And a t-bar/flex plate rear suspension would work better on a smooth/carpet track.

But that's based purely on theory, I'm not consistent enough to favor one over the other even though I have both.
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Old 04-20-2015, 07:38 AM
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I've been running the StreetJam SJF01 on carpet and rubber tires and absolutely love the car so far. I've ran a Tamiya F104 pro before and the SJF01 is a much better handling car. I've been racing against a VBC Lightning all season and finishing results are comparable (at least on our track). Mind you I'm not the best racer and I'm running a Reedy 21.5 that is a few seasons old now and has seen better days.

More info can be found at http://www.rctech.net/forum/electric...iiiice-29.html
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Old 04-20-2015, 09:44 AM
  #25  
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Dodson ran a super old Tamiya t-plate car for ages and did decently well. He's a great driver and one of the most consistent I've seen. Once he got the X-ray, he was kicking major butt. It was like going from a Civic to a Ferrari.
Yes, Chris is a great driver and really good guy. He has been super helpful to me. I race in 2 classes with him, in the Tamiya Mini class he is consistently 2 spots ahead of me in the A mains. He makes me a better/more competitive driver!

----

Lots of great info here!
I am selling a lot of my RC collection on eBay, -trying to focus only on the cars and parts I race. Once all the sales complete i'll be purchasing a new F1 (leaning towards the Xray X1).
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Old 04-20-2015, 10:46 AM
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Just wanted to put it out there. The CRC WTF and the VBC lightning are also very very good choices. I watched and raced with probably the most competitive field of F1 drivers in the US this last weekend. There was a wide mix of cars in the A main. It's the same results as in Europe in the ETS series. With that said, looked to your better drivers local to you{like Chris Dodson} and you can't go wrong.You can get the help you need. Have fun.
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Old 04-20-2015, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by viking44
That's weird, I've always thought that due to the range of motion a link suspension provides, that it'd be more suited to bumpy tracks. And a t-bar/flex plate rear suspension would work better on a smooth/carpet track.

But that's based purely on theory, I'm not consistent enough to favor one over the other even though I have both.
I had expected the same but in practice the wider link pod pivots below the chassis scraping aggressively over large bumps. The springs seem to take longer to settle once upset compared to a loaded t-plate. On more technical sections the free pod movement and extra spring options help the links rotate better in tighter low speed corners.

Last edited by mtveten; 04-20-2015 at 03:12 PM.
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Old 04-20-2015, 02:02 PM
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Originally Posted by viking44
That's weird, I've always thought that due to the range of motion a link suspension provides, that it'd be more suited to bumpy tracks. And a t-bar/flex plate rear suspension would work better on a smooth/carpet track.

But that's based purely on theory, I'm not consistent enough to favor one over the other even though I have both.
I actually talked to a lot of old time 1/12 guys (from the days when 1/12 on asphalt was common) who said the t bar cars always made more traction.
Jim Dieter told me one time he felt the same way about t bar 1/12 cars. More traction has to help with rubber tires.
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Old 04-21-2015, 01:58 PM
  #29  
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I'd go Xray
Dodson went from finishing third behind me and Brandon every race to winning once he swapped to Xray
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