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VBC WILDFIRE D07

Old 05-05-2015, 05:43 AM
  #436  
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I'm running LTC-R, 4.5t modified.

I think the straights are ok. I'm looking for more mid corner to corner exit.

Thank you!

Originally Posted by theproffesor View Post
What body are you running? What class / size motor? You could need a gearing change. Are you trying to push the limit on the straights or through the infield? do you want to gain corner entry or corner exit speed? There are many factors that go into "push the car to the limit". We need to know what limit you are referring too.
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Old 05-05-2015, 07:49 AM
  #437  
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Ok can anyone explain the advantages of using raised towers and longer springs over the stock setup. Why would I want to, and when would I want to?
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Old 05-05-2015, 08:21 AM
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Originally Posted by patorz31 View Post
Ok can anyone explain the advantages of using raised towers and longer springs over the stock setup. Why would I want to, and when would I want to?

cannot disagree with that question being asked as I asked the very same one 3 posts ago
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Old 05-05-2015, 08:45 AM
  #439  
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This is what Lucas Urbain posted on facebook to my question.

"Higher shock towers will raise the center of gravity, making the car roll deeper. As a result you get a bit more traction and rotation. It will also give a more aggressive feel to the car.

Still early testing though..."
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Old 05-06-2015, 12:52 AM
  #440  
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cheers man. I killed my FB account a few months back, I'm missing on some of the action

Phil... if you read this... your comments are welcome

Paul
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Old 05-06-2015, 03:54 AM
  #441  
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no time, short answer :-)

I suspect, that in a given damper and for example a constant shaft speed the damper force increases near the end of the possible shaft motion.
The damper force surely occurs because of viscous friction. But this does not only happen at the holes of the piston and the slot between piston and cylinder side wall. The is also viscous friction created by the mass flow in the relative chambers (over and unter the piston). When the upper chamber (on bump) or lower chamber (on rebound) becomes smaller the "chamber-internal" fluid friction increases.
The shorter damper acts more progressive in his damping effect when the piston almost moves to the bladder (i'm not mentioning progressive force over increasing shaft speed).
Now what has that to do with RC damper length?

When racing on low grip, you want as much as possible, so you want as less wheel load alteration as possible which can be achieved by using a as linear as possible wheel rate. (i have read, that the HPI Silvers are quite linear/less progressive as others maybe thats why they "feel" so good on the track).
If someone wants to take a deeper look, just look at things like jacking forces because of progressive wheel rate or roll center possition.

Longer dampers seem to be better on lower grip just by watching, what the pro drivers are using. And in my created theory (@freak) i can explain why.
So lets use offroad dampers (ROFL).
Back to honesty: I think there is an effect but it is small.

Phil
PS: Back to exam...

Last edited by Worst87; 05-06-2015 at 09:36 AM.
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Old 05-06-2015, 09:19 AM
  #442  
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Viscous.
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Old 05-06-2015, 09:37 AM
  #443  
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Corrected, thanks
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Old 05-06-2015, 06:34 PM
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Hi

What other brand belt fits on this kit?

Thanks
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Old 05-11-2015, 07:43 AM
  #445  
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Ok take a look at the way this VBC chassis appears to be cut.


Why would you?
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Old 05-12-2015, 02:31 AM
  #446  
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because you want to save a chassis that's been partially delaminated on the side and you feel that as long as it holds in one "piece" it can still do the job.

or maybe because it's just plain broken

Anyway, I wouldn't

Paul
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Old 05-12-2015, 03:27 AM
  #447  
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New "lo-light conditions" body... simplistic, but still



Edit... crap, fluo doesn't show that well...
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Old 05-12-2015, 03:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Worst87 View Post
no time, short answer :-)

I suspect, that in a given damper and for example a constant shaft speed the damper force increases near the end of the possible shaft motion.
The damper force surely occurs because of viscous friction. But this does not only happen at the holes of the piston and the slot between piston and cylinder side wall. The is also viscous friction created by the mass flow in the relative chambers (over and unter the piston). When the upper chamber (on bump) or lower chamber (on rebound) becomes smaller the "chamber-internal" fluid friction increases.
The shorter damper acts more progressive in his damping effect when the piston almost moves to the bladder (i'm not mentioning progressive force over increasing shaft speed).
Now what has that to do with RC damper length?

When racing on low grip, you want as much as possible, so you want as less wheel load alteration as possible which can be achieved by using a as linear as possible wheel rate. (i have read, that the HPI Silvers are quite linear/less progressive as others maybe thats why they "feel" so good on the track).
If someone wants to take a deeper look, just look at things like jacking forces because of progressive wheel rate or roll center possition.

Longer dampers seem to be better on lower grip just by watching, what the pro drivers are using. And in my created theory (@freak) i can explain why.
So lets use offroad dampers (ROFL).
Back to honesty: I think there is an effect but it is small.

Phil
PS: Back to exam...
I love it
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Old 05-16-2015, 01:04 AM
  #449  
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.
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Old 05-16-2015, 04:56 AM
  #450  
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Originally Posted by Lonestar View Post
New "lo-light conditions" body... simplistic, but still


Edit... crap, fluo doesn't show that well...
Hi Paul,

Can you share how did you mount the 3rd front body post?
Thanks Fred
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