Driver Etiquette

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Old 11-16-2013, 04:52 PM
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Default Driver Etiquette

After reading this http://www.thercracer.com/2013/11/he...it-my-car.html it got me thinking about the thorny subject of collisions in racing.

I personally always consider these things as an acceptable accident, although I have been in some heats where the quality of driving from some drivers made me consider retiring to protect my car (its precious to me). I will have a word with others if I feel aggrieved but I try to be constructive, asking if their car was handling ok etc,

I have also pulled out of races if I feel my car is unresponsive, or has a failure so that I won't hit another driver and also ruin their race.

I wonder what are your do's and fonts of driver etiquette?
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Old 11-16-2013, 05:52 PM
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As Gollum says. "My precious"

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Old 11-16-2013, 07:31 PM
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Driver etiquette is when you don't let your fat gut hang out so the guy next to you can see his car when it hits the sweeper.
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Old 11-16-2013, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by hanzo3 View Post
Driver etiquette is when you don't let your fat gut hang out so the guy next to you can see his car when it hits the sweeper.

Don't have any idea what that's about
But it made me laugh
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Old 11-16-2013, 08:04 PM
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Depends on the people around you. Some are cool and show respect for others. Some are idiots who think the track is theirs and you have to either talk to them nicely or put them in the wall. There is also the ones you have to do both.
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Old 11-16-2013, 08:42 PM
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I usually pull my car off the track if I feel its not handling well after a crash or if my car is tweaked. Its not fun when the car is not responding to the inputs you are giving it. A controllable car is better for the well being of the other drivers.

I wouldn't want to hit lap traffic with guys unpredictable spinning out or cars washing wide slamming into boards
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Old 11-17-2013, 12:55 AM
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Well, here's the real question...what about noobs or people who just really suck (like me)? If new racers are expected to go slow and/or stay out of the way...then they can't get better. If you yell at them or are aggressive towards them...they won't come back. If new racers or those that aren't very good stop coming...what happens? Racing dies right? If it's always the same 3-4 guys showing up and that's it...tracks make no money, close and then nobody races. I stopped racing onroad because there was no way to learn except in races or "practice" nights which were just another racing night. People were willing to help with setup and advice but still...no way to get better other than during a race where people got upset (and showed it) if you got in their way or hit them. There really aren't any "beginner" classes it seems. Everyone races "stock", nobody races anything faster...so, no place to learn once again since the seasoned racers are still running with the new guys. VTA is slower but...the vets are racing that too and not everyone wants or likes to race those bodies. Personally, If they hit you, who cares. If they hit the wall, who cares. If it causes your car to break...who cares. They are toy cars. Just have fun and if you can't...well, onroad dies. There's a reason that scale crawlers are the fastest growing segment. The competition means next to nothing because everyone is having fun.
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Old 11-17-2013, 01:17 AM
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There is an easy way to solve this: Communication. Talk to people on the driver stand in training. If you are the fast guy, ask them to let you pass. If you are the slower guy or beginner let him through after he got stuck behind your car for a couple of corners. There is really no need to distract the training of other people. It should be an understanding to give space to faster cars and to be patient with slower cars even without talking. If you make contact apologize right away.

On raceday communication on the driver stand can be a distraction for the other drivers, so it is better to have the announcer give information to the drivers. If you don't have one and don't know the guys you are driving with, communicate before your race (drivers meeting) and make gentleman agreements, like waiting if you caused someone to chrash or lapped drivers will not block the fast guys and so on.
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Old 11-17-2013, 02:46 AM
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Originally Posted by wtcc View Post
On raceday communication on the driver stand can be a distraction for the other drivers
Ya, and I'm counting on it. Nothing feels better than telling the 3rd place guy that you are trailing by two infield corners "Hey Sam, you are One mistake away from me getting a ribbon." And then watching or hearing him stuff it on the very next lap.

Remember kids, in the end, it doesn't really matter whether you win or lose.... It's how bad you beat 'em.
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Old 11-17-2013, 03:22 AM
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Just a personal view on TC but sadly communication often doesn't work in my experience. I'm in the UK. There are an alarming number of idiots here. Its always the same people. It only takes a few to kill it for everyone. I'm at the point of losing interest in driving anywhere but my local club, which is very small. I like it because everybody knows each other and we have a good laugh..the bigger meetings are the worst, either you get taken out or stuck behind a slow driver who won't move over.

The only large meeting I have attended that I honestly enjoyed was a full two day BRCA National. Drivers who show a poor attitude to others will not be tolerated. I saw a few guys having a go at the officials who rightly stood their ground. This is the correct way because people spend big money to attend and support the hobby, and if they are not treated fairly they might not be willing to show so much commitment in the future and we all suffer.

Unfortunately for less experienced drivers these meetings can be rather intimidating with all the rules and regulations but actually these are the best places to go if you are relatively new to it.

Another thing that really stood out for me is it was my first time in modified, and I almost couldn't believe how much respect the drivers showed each other, in the heats and especially in the finals. People gave each other room to settle down into the first laps, as a result actual racing was allowed to happen, which was awesome..big thumbs up to the BRCA.

In stock especially indoor carpet if you are not in the top heat you can forget it.
Its so much more fun to actually have a race but it needs respect for this to happen. Someone always decides they are going to win it in the first corner. Every time. 1000+ on the kit and the whole day is just down to luck.
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Old 11-17-2013, 03:36 AM
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At our club, heats are graded according to skill level. Depending on attendees, this sometimes can be mixed in the mid-skill heats which is where you can get the problems. We have one or two drivers who race like stock car drivers and have no regard for anyone else. This caused me to downgrade my car to something cheaper as I'm not one of the fastest and can sometimes be in a heat with either noobs or reckless drivers. Our club has a great atmosphere and won't discourage anyone, therefore we are quite tolerant with lower skilled drivers. We are racing toy cars after all and it should be fun.
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Old 11-17-2013, 03:49 AM
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Originally Posted by muahdib4 View Post
If new racers are expected to go slow and/or stay out of the way...then they can't get better.
IMHO, that is absolutely NOT true at all. As a beginner, driving with a purpose of staying out of the way is just as valuable (if not more so due to moving "obstacles") than driving with the intent of sticking to proper racing lines. Learning to stick to a line, no matter what it's destination, is exactly what newbies need. Tracktime, tracktime, tracktime.
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Old 11-17-2013, 04:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Lessen View Post
IMHO, that is absolutely NOT true at all. As a beginner, driving with a purpose of staying out of the way is just as valuable (if not more so due to moving "obstacles") than driving with the intent of sticking to proper racing lines. Learning to stick to a line, no matter what it's destination, is exactly what newbies need. Tracktime, tracktime, tracktime.
But they don't actually get "tracktime", they get "pullover" time. No chance to pull any kind of consistent laps. Then, they quit because it just isn't any fun. Ever wonder why onroad has been on the decline? It's not just the cheater motors, lawsuits and chassis of the week....its consistently due to there being no fun for new and not fast folks.
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Old 11-17-2013, 04:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Lessen View Post
IMHO, that is absolutely NOT true at all. As a beginner, driving with a purpose of staying out of the way is just as valuable (if not more so due to moving "obstacles") than driving with the intent of sticking to proper racing lines. Learning to stick to a line, no matter what it's destination, is exactly what newbies need. Tracktime, tracktime, tracktime.
+1
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Old 11-17-2013, 04:40 AM
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Racing with the same people, for the most part, every week I know everyone's cars. If we are racing, heat or main, and I see that another racer is coming up on me i announce to them that i'm " going wide " in the next corner. This always works for me because I don't loose any time, they get by clean, and everyone is happy. Pulling over on the other hand is an unexpected move. Most fast guys would rather you maintain your line, communicate your intentions, and they adjust to make their move. They are faster than me because they have the ability to put their cars where they want them better than me, so hugging a corner is no problem to them.
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