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Old 06-14-2005, 01:27 PM   #1
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Default New Shock Shaft Design?

I was wondering if this has been tried or thought of before:
Putting a hex at the very top of the shaft to speed up and simplify building them.
I personaly hate screwing on the cups and dread rebuilds because of this.
Even with a tap screw, its still a pain since everything is coated in oil making it even more difficult to get a hold of the shaft. And if you make a mistake, you scratch the shaft. I even tried those Tamiya non scratch pliers. They suck, save your money.
I included a picture to illustrate what I mean.
So whats up?, Animaniacs Style:
"Good Idea, Bad Idea?"
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New Shock Shaft Design?-shockshaft.jpg  
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Old 06-14-2005, 01:34 PM   #2
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i think losi have done this on the jrxs shocks
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Old 06-14-2005, 01:43 PM   #3
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No, I think what Losi did was tap the end of the shaft so the pistons are held on by a button head screw instead of E-clips. But you can put the screw in and use it to thread in the ball end on the shaft like scooby's idea. Both are good ideas though.
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Old 06-14-2005, 02:07 PM   #4
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Yokomo had a similar design on their shocks when they released the YZ870C Dogfighter (1989).

The piston end of the shaft was threaded, so the piston was held in place by a small nut. Better still, the other end of the shock shaft (the spring retainer end) had no thread - the alloy spring retainer simply pushed on and was held in place by a grub screw going through the side of the spring retainer.

With this design the shocks were always exactly the same length
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Old 06-14-2005, 04:27 PM   #5
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I just thought it was simple to do and have many benefits.
It doesn't take much to get leverage and screw on the cups.
Even a 1mm hex would do the trick.
Maybe HPI or Tamiya could start the trend.
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Old 06-14-2005, 04:55 PM   #6
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scooby...It's a great idea, but manufacturing cost would be much higher. Would be a great aftermarket product from a manufacture
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Old 06-14-2005, 05:03 PM   #7
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Gee, I wonder who could do that kind of machining.
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Old 06-14-2005, 05:37 PM   #8
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Integy makes a nice set of shock shaft pliers number INTC22353 I have these and they work really well... there around 20.00
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Old 06-14-2005, 05:42 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Kerr
Gee, I wonder who could do that kind of machining.

are you thinking who i'm thinking of?
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Old 06-14-2005, 06:15 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Kerr
Gee, I wonder who could do that kind of machining.
OK, i'm lost. Fill me in.
P Dub:
Definitely an aftermarket part. I know manufacturers wouldn't want to do it for free. But hey, I would gladly pay extra for these. I know many people would.
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Old 06-14-2005, 06:29 PM   #11
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I can't see how manufacturing these things would be THAT much more involved. After all, putting a hex at the end of it would pretty much make it a precision screw!
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Old 06-14-2005, 06:49 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goonish
I can't see how manufacturing these things would be THAT much more involved. After all, putting a hex at the end of it would pretty much make it a precision screw!
It's not a matter of how hard, but how many extra steps Each extra step = $$$
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Old 06-14-2005, 07:21 PM   #13
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i can only see 1 extra step.

instead of threading the outside of the shaft..simply drill a hole (doing this instead of the thread on outside of the shaft) and then thread that hole......then include a screw with the kit.

i don't see how drilling a hole can be expensive
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Old 06-14-2005, 07:41 PM   #14
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The area where the hex part meets the round shaft would become a stress riser and the shaft would snap there is the shaft is hardened or bend there if it is not.

It is a great idea but the shock shaft is so highly stressed in crashes that this would not be a practical thing to do.
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Old 06-14-2005, 07:44 PM   #15
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adrian...sign on aol
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