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Old 01-14-2021, 03:44 PM   -   Wikipost
R/C Tech ForumsThread Wiki: Tamiya TT02 Thread
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TT02 Wiki - Post your setups, upgrades and home grown ideas here for us to read...

TT02 vs the TT-01
http://www.thercracer.com/2013/01/ta...irst-pics.html
New flat chassis layout - Easier to run LiPOs vs the cutouts in the TT-01s
Revised suspension geometry
Support for std spur gears

MODELS ----------------------------------------------------

Changes that follow are in comparison to the basic kit.
TT02 - Base Kit. Friction Dampers.
TT02D - Drift: Drift Tires, Hardened A-Parts, Oil Shocks
TT02R - Race: Rear Alu 3* Toe In Hubs, Alu Propshaft + Cups, CVA oil Dampers
TT02RR - Race+: TT02R + Adjustable Upper Arms, Oil Filled Diffs, Hardened Blue Chassis
TT02S - Type S: TRF416 arms, FRP shock towers, bearings,
TT02SR - TypeS Race: TT02S + Double cardan front drive shafts, rear lightweight universals, Rear sealed oil differential, front spool
TT02B - Buggy. Offroad: CVA Shocks, Double Wishbone long suspension

HOP UPS ----------------------------------------------------

Bearings:
#54476 Ball Bearing Set TT02: 8x 1050, 4x 1280, 4x 1150

Propshaft:
#54501 Alum Propeller Shaft TT02
#54502 Alum Propeller Joint TT02
Tip:
Put a 3mm piece of well greased silicone hose between the dog bone and the shaft of each wheel to reduce slop.

Motor Mount and Gearing:
#54558 TT02 Aluminum Motor Mount
#54500 High Speed Gear Set
#54875 Oil Gear Differential

Steering:
#54550 Low Friction Step Screws
- Full Upgrade Kit -
#54752 Steering Upgrade Kit, Includes all below.
- Individual Parts -
#54574 Aluminum Steering Set
#54575 Aluminum Steering Bridge
#54799 Hi-Torque Servo Saver or #51000 Servo Saver Black
#54248 Aluminum Turnbuckles 3x23
#50797 5mm Short Adjustable Turnbuckle End


Dog Bones to Universal Joints:
- Standard Steel -
#53792 Universal Shaft Assembly (steel), NOTE: Must also use item 54477 on the TT-02
#54477 Gearbox Joint for Universal Shaft (steel) (2pieces)
- Lightweight -
#53506 Blue Aluminum 39mm Swing Shaft
#53499 Wheel axle for assembly universal
#53681 Titanium wheel axle for assemblu universal (but this is very expensive)
#53500 cross joints for universal
#54477 Gearbox Joint for Universal Shaft (2pieces)
Tip: Run steel in the front, Alu is okay for the rear but the front takes a lot of wear and impact from crashes

Shock Options:
#54753 Super-mini CVA Oil Shocks, comes with med black springs
#42102 TRF 55mm Shocks

Chassis:
#54639 Carbon Damper Stay Front
#54640 Carbon Damper Stay Rear
#47339 Hard Lower Deck Blue
#47340 Hard Lower Deck White
#54926 Hard Lower Deck Black
#54733 Aluminum Rear Uprights, Gives 3* rear toe in for extra stability
#54549 Aluminum Rear Uprights, 2.5* Rear Toe In
#58584 Hardened A-Parts, Uprights, Hub Carriers, Diff Covers, etc

SUGGESTED BASE SETUPS ----------------------------------

Bashing:
Build to the kit instructions and have fun!

Asphalt Parking Lot Racing:
Front Diff: 300k-500k (or Tamiya #42247 Gear differential putty)
Rear Diff: 3K oil in the rear diff for low / medium grip, 5k oil in the rear for medium / high grip

Carpet Indoor Racing:
Front Diff: 300k-500k (or Tamiya #42247 Gear differential putty)
Rear Diff: 7k -10k in the rear diff for very high grip carpet.


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES -------------------------------------

TT02 Build and Review here
http://www.thercracer.com/2013/05/ta...nd-review.html

TT02 Tuning and Mods Guide
http://www.thercracer.com/2014/08/ta...-and-tips.html
https://www.rcdriver.com/take-the-versatile-tamiya-tt-02-chassis-to-the-next-level/


Gearing for 17.5t Blinky
http://www.thercracer.com/2013/07/ho...inky-with.html











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Old 08-20-2022, 05:35 PM
  #3376  
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I need to try the yellow /blue springs on my GT MK II.
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Old 09-08-2022, 05:00 AM
  #3377  
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Hi. I have seen that there is a spool for the TT-02, the Tamiya #22047, and tamiya sells the conic gears as spare part #51704. Watching this spare gears,




I noticed that they are very similar to the conic gears of the old TT-01 ball differential #53663, but with 12 holes instead 10. Does anyone know if this gear could fit on the TT-01 differential? I think that adding 2 ball more, probably, but it will be great if someo can confirm it.
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Old 09-10-2022, 11:58 AM
  #3378  
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Hi all - I am wondering what hop ups/upgrades or full setups would be a good starting point if picking up a TT02 for onroad club racing? I would be starting out just learning to drive again before jumping into a novice class but would like to have it set up where it can be competitive after that
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Old 09-10-2022, 02:50 PM
  #3379  
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Originally Posted by Zac_with_no_K View Post
Hi all - I am wondering what hop ups/upgrades or full setups would be a good starting point if picking up a TT02 for onroad club racing? I would be starting out just learning to drive again before jumping into a novice class but would like to have it set up where it can be competitive after that
Don't fool yourself. The tt02, isn't good for club racing, unless there is a specific TT class.

The TT02 is a reliable, consistent, drivable car. It is a platform you can learn on. But it's not good for racing in "open" classes. There are $100 cars that have all the features, caster, camber, easily swapped gearing, metal body shocks, oil filled shocks, anti-dive, adjustable toe, adjustable camber gain, adjustable roll centers... which are things that are essentially out of the question for TT cars.

So what you want to hear. Buy a good steering servo. Something with less than 0.1 second 60deg rating. Spend $30 on some yeah racing or 3 racing oil filled shocks. Spend $25 on a bearing set. Buy a heavy duty servo saver (Tamiya's is good) which is $10 or so. Spending more money is shoveling good money after bad. This is entirely about making the car controllable and long lasting, so you can learn to drive. The pogo sticks it comes with make the car less consistent. the stock servo saver is to soft to drive straight really. And bearings remove a lot of slop from the wheels so the car goes where you want it to go.

If you want to get actually competitive, you really need to buy a different car. "the parts to get those features" are available for the TT02, but you do not want a $1000 tt02. And buying carbon shock towers, TRF416 arms, adjustable roll center parts, gearing parts, oil filled diff, spool adapter, universal joints, metal drive cups, swaybars, and more quickly ends up the cost of just buying something capable to start with.
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Old 09-11-2022, 09:32 AM
  #3380  
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Originally Posted by Zac_with_no_K View Post
Hi all - I am wondering what hop ups/upgrades or full setups would be a good starting point if picking up a TT02 for onroad club racing? I would be starting out just learning to drive again before jumping into a novice class but would like to have it set up where it can be competitive after that
Best thing to do is check with your local club as there are different levels to attain.
Our club runs a Production class - TT02/TT01e. Box build. Only allowed ball bearings, USGT tires, universal joints and some mods that do not improve performance but improves reliability.
After that the next step is USGT which the TT02 will be slaughtered in.
I've been running the Production class when I got back into the hobby in summer 2020. It's a fun class as every car is basically a spec car. So there's no advantage except the driver.
Could mods I recommend as long as your club allows is using a longer hex screw when assembling the front steering knuckles. These are pretty fragile when you first start out. Longer screw will reinforce this area.



Also trim the "ears" on the front suspension arms and the steering knuckle AFTER installing universal joints for the front. The "ears" or the steering limiters will limit how much steering you will have. After trimming you will have more steering for sharper corners.
Add some sticky grease to the front diff and leave the rear empty (at least this is how I like my car). I use Lucas Red & Tacky, some others use AW Grease. You want some diff action but do not lock the front diff.
Lastly we add a little Lucas Red & Tacky in our shocks to prevent them from pogo-sticking while cornering.
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Old 09-12-2022, 07:29 PM
  #3381  
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I bought the Yeah racing universal shafts but tried to use the stock C2 part in the picture. But the shafts are to long and you can not adjust the suppension to level. I do have the yeah racing C2 parts coming hoping that it will fix the problem.? Any help would be appreciated.
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Old 09-13-2022, 04:49 AM
  #3382  
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Originally Posted by BullFrog View Post
I bought the Yeah racing universal shafts but tried to use the stock C2 part in the picture. But the shafts are to long and you can not adjust the suppension to level. I do have the yeah racing C2 parts coming hoping that it will fix the problem.? Any help would be appreciated.
There are two versions of the universal joints and cups.
There's the smaller ball end of the universal joints which need the smaller cups.
And of course the larger ball end which need the larger cups.
Which part number did you order?
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Old 09-13-2022, 07:42 AM
  #3383  
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TT02-015 and I ordered the 017 to see if that would work. They should be in this friday.
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Old 09-13-2022, 08:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Eotz View Post
Hi. I have seen that there is a spool for the TT-02, the Tamiya #22047, and tamiya sells the conic gears as spare part #51704. Watching this spare gears,




I noticed that they are very similar to the conic gears of the old TT-01 ball differential #53663, but with 12 holes instead 10. Does anyone know if this gear could fit on the TT-01 differential? I think that adding 2 ball more, probably, but it will be great if someo can confirm it.
Tamiya 54649 does the trick.
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Old 09-13-2022, 08:20 AM
  #3385  
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Originally Posted by Nerobro View Post
Don't fool yourself. The tt02, isn't good for club racing, unless there is a specific TT class.

The TT02 is a reliable, consistent, drivable car. It is a platform you can learn on. But it's not good for racing in "open" classes. There are $100 cars that have all the features, caster, camber, easily swapped gearing, metal body shocks, oil filled shocks, anti-dive, adjustable toe, adjustable camber gain, adjustable roll centers... which are things that are essentially out of the question for TT cars.

So what you want to hear. Buy a good steering servo. Something with less than 0.1 second 60deg rating. Spend $30 on some yeah racing or 3 racing oil filled shocks. Spend $25 on a bearing set. Buy a heavy duty servo saver (Tamiya's is good) which is $10 or so. Spending more money is shoveling good money after bad. This is entirely about making the car controllable and long lasting, so you can learn to drive. The pogo sticks it comes with make the car less consistent. the stock servo saver is to soft to drive straight really. And bearings remove a lot of slop from the wheels so the car goes where you want it to go.

If you want to get actually competitive, you really need to buy a different car. "the parts to get those features" are available for the TT02, but you do not want a $1000 tt02. And buying carbon shock towers, TRF416 arms, adjustable roll center parts, gearing parts, oil filled diff, spool adapter, universal joints, metal drive cups, swaybars, and more quickly ends up the cost of just buying something capable to start with.
Preach on, brother...

Tamiya has a fantastic entry level-product that get a lot of newcomers to the hobby thanks to the awesome-looking licensed bodies&wheels... Unfortunately a lot of these new hobbyists then give up after they realize the TT01 will not be competitive outside of a TT01 spec class, even after fitting $300 of blue alloy bits to their cars. Tamiya, 3racing and yeah-racing are really really guilty on that front...
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Old 09-13-2022, 08:36 AM
  #3386  
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Originally Posted by Lonestar View Post
Preach on, brother...

Tamiya has a fantastic entry level-product that get a lot of newcomers to the hobby thanks to the awesome-looking licensed bodies&wheels... Unfortunately a lot of these new hobbyists then give up after they realize the TT01 will not be competitive outside of a TT01 spec class, even after fitting $300 of blue alloy bits to their cars. Tamiya, 3racing and yeah-racing are really really guilty on that front...
95% of individuals that purchase an RC car do not race, nor will ever have the intent to compete.

I know that’s a very hard idea accept for those of us that do compete, but it’s the truth. in fact 5% is probably a stretch

TT Spec classes have limits on hop ups, so the initial investment is very low. I am fairly certain that once they chose to step up to the next class, they are given guidance on the limit of the TT chassis and what should be their next chassis

So the only guilt that goes around is poor guidance by experienced racers, not the manufacturer.
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Old 09-13-2022, 04:30 PM
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The only reason I purchased a TT02 is because a group of us wanted something to play with at the races. We all are very experienced racers. Its just a class to have fun in as My race classes are for competition. It has been awhile since I put together a plastic car- the last was the Euro truck but quickly sold it. We'll see how long I stay with this class -especially where I plan on racing it ( a rough parking lot). I can go back many years for the Tamiya cars and buggy's I have had That's what they make and like what has been said over 90% never see the race track. At this track I plan on racing at the biggest class is the Tamiya Euro Trucks (20+)and hopefully the TT02s.You have to have fun!
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Old 09-14-2022, 08:29 AM
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Tamiya’s own ProSpec class is a lot of fun and has low entry costs. At present you are allowed to use certain hop ops that will increase the investment into the kit, but none honestly provide any improvement performance. At our last TCS, the 2nd place driver built his car from spares and was up amongst the top 3.. 1 and 3 had full optioned TT02 RRs.

ps, I was 3rd 😉
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Old 09-14-2022, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Raman View Post
Tamiya’s own ProSpec class is a lot of fun and has low entry costs. At present you are allowed to use certain hop ops that will increase the investment into the kit, but none honestly provide any improvement performance. At our last TCS, the 2nd place driver built his car from spares and was up amongst the top 3.. 1 and 3 had full optioned TT02 RRs.

ps, I was 3rd 😉
How do the cars compare when running the kit rear hubs vs hop up 3 degrees? Is it a big difference?
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Old 09-14-2022, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Raman View Post
Tamiya’s own ProSpec class is a lot of fun and has low entry costs. At present you are allowed to use certain hop ops that will increase the investment into the kit, but none honestly provide any improvement performance.
Really, not even ball bearings or oil dampers?
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