R/C Tech Forums

Go Back   R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-21-2012, 11:15 AM   #31
Tech Champion
 
AdrianM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 5,914
Trader Rating: 4 (100%+)
Default

I have been racing sedans for years. All you need a a camber gauge, a ride height gauge, a caliper and a flat surface. Everything else is considered nice to have but not essential.

BTW, I do not trust the Hudy and Integy expensive setup tools. I have shown racers time and again that they are LESS accurate than a camber gauge, a ride height gauge, a caliper and a flat surface.
__________________
Adrian Martinez
What I run: Schumacher Mi5/Associated RC10R5.1/Associated RC12R5.2/Futaba/HobbyWing/Team EA Motorsports/BSR Racing
Where I run: Florida Indoor R/C Complex/Thunder Racing/Florida On Road State Series
AdrianM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 12:47 PM   #32
Tech Regular
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: UK
Posts: 437
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AdrianM View Post
BTW, I do not trust the Hudy and Integy expensive setup tools. I have shown racers time and again that they are LESS accurate than a camber gauge, a ride height gauge, a caliper and a flat surface.
Have to agree, the gauges load the axles in completely the wrong direction. The problem is slop really, but that's going to be a part of the hobby for a while yet.
cyclonetog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 01:59 PM   #33
Tech Master
 
Razathorn's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,972
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JiuHaWong View Post
Yes... you don't necessarily need a setup station for off road, but IMHO, it is more accurate than say using a camber gauge and laying it against a tire that is probably out of round. Think about how real mechanics adjust camber/toe/caster on a real car, they use an alignment rack, they don't measure it out or guess by their eye.
Trust me, the vast majority of top tier off road drivers do not use setup stations like the ones you're talking about. There are a select few who try to, but most don't. It's not more accurate, its extremely frustrating to use those. There is a significant quantity of slop in offroad cars that have been ran in and you set them up at full weight with the tires you're going to run on a setup board. You have to drop the car, let it settle, roll it a bit forward and back, then do your settings. Throwing an offroad car that has "slopped in a bit to where it is good" from "new kit state" on one of those setup stations is an exercise in futility--the settings are all over the place.
__________________
AE B6D / AE B44.3 / AE RC10WC / AE RC8B3
Razathorn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 03:07 PM   #34
Tech Master
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Kaohsiung City, Taiwan
Posts: 1,571
Send a message via ICQ to JiuHaWong
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Razathorn View Post
Trust me, the vast majority of top tier off road drivers do not use setup stations like the ones you're talking about. There are a select few who try to, but most don't. It's not more accurate, its extremely frustrating to use those. There is a significant quantity of slop in offroad cars that have been ran in and you set them up at full weight with the tires you're going to run on a setup board. You have to drop the car, let it settle, roll it a bit forward and back, then do your settings. Throwing an offroad car that has "slopped in a bit to where it is good" from "new kit state" on one of those setup stations is an exercise in futility--the settings are all over the place.
In my experience, quite a few of the "top tier" drivers (on and off road) rely more on their ability to drive than their set-up skills. I can recall the last conversation I had with a "sponsored" driver. He couldn't explain to me what change would do what. He just knew to run the setup the team was using, and to drive as fast as he could. Didn't inspire much confidence in the product he was representing...

I don't understand how you can state they (setup stations) are "frustrating" to use? If anything, they are really easy to use. Especially for Touring Car, they are worth every penny. Offroad? Well, that's debatable. I found it useful, and obviously, you don't/didn't. If you car is so sloppy that your settings are continuously changing...well, perhaps you should replace parts more often.

C'est La Vie....
JiuHaWong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 04:15 PM   #35
Tech Addict
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 556
Default

I would say that if your camber or front toe is out by a bit, its not really going to make much difference, considering the slop in most cars. Especially on rubber tyres. Foam tyres will cone if the camber is wrong. Just do the best you can with the tools you have.

Really the most important things to consider apart from driving are:

Diff settings
Rear toe
Shock oil and pistons
Ackermann setting (very important)
Wheelbase

there may be others, but these have often been where I head to first to fix a problem with pretty much any type of rc car
ixlr8nz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2012, 06:10 AM   #36
Tech Initiate
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 28
Trader Rating: 8 (100%+)
Default

Years ago, when I was racing (been out of it for a while), I was running an MR4-TC Pro, and all I had was a RPM camber gauge, RPM toe gauge, a ruler, and the allen wrenches for ride height. I was running mid B-main most of the time.

In all honesty, I never did much tweaking on the car. I found some setup sheets on the web, and just kept trying them until I found what I liked. At the beginning of race day, I would check out the settings to make sure they didn't chance, and that was the end of it. I think I ran that car without changing anything other than gearing, even when going to different tracks.
Tbird232ci is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2013, 12:11 PM   #37
Tech Elite
 
niznai's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: All over the place
Posts: 2,940
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ixlr8nz View Post

[...]

Really the most important things to consider apart from driving are:

Diff settings
Rear toe
Shock oil and pistons
Ackermann setting (very important)
Wheelbase

there may be others, but these have often been where I head to first to fix a problem with pretty much any type of rc car
I don't agree. I think the most important consideration is choosing the right tire. True, this is taken out of the equation most of the time with control tires, but I think that brings you 90% there. Choose the wrong tire and you'll chase your tail forever with all the setup stations.

I agree with the fact that setup stations can be frustrating to use.

If your car has slop that is.

I have learnt to dial out slop to a level that the setup station (Hudy in my case) it's actually useful. Most of the time you don't need it, but this comes after miles and miles of racing. My cars have less slop than the station reading error at the wheel (that is about .5 degree).

But the station itself can help you find out that you have slop (and how much and where it is and when it's too much). I can read my cars when they develop slop (by normal wear) and decide if I am happy or not with it. I can take readings and be correct when my cars have a lot of slop because I have a station and I have used it for a long time. Without it, I think you're shooting in the dark. After many years of racing and using it, you will have the eye formed, but not before.

It will also contribute to instilling good habits for car maintenance, routines that will stay with you for a long time. As a beginner, things can be confusing and without a station I remember chasing at no end difficult to locate problems such as bent hingepins (they're not always obvious), or some subtle steering problems and so on. For a beginner all this is daunting. For me the setup station provided the platform I needed to make sure reference points are absolute and reliable and measurements are repeatable. This is very helpful when you don't know what's wrong.

But this may be a bit too early for you. Your car is brilliant (and you were lucky to find it new, so it doesn't have some problems developed over time or hidden) and I would recommend setting it up as per manual and trying to run it without pushing too hard, until you learn the ropes. The manual setup of Yokomo cars I think it's more than close enough for a beginner. I actually run a couple on manual setup for their entire lives (indoor and outdoor, on tires) and was very happy with it. Only my own lack of talent kept me off the podium, not the cars. Still working on it.
__________________
Team Greasy Weasel

The best upgrade to any car is some driver skill.
niznai is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pan car vs Touring Car what is the difference? Photoman586 Electric On-Road 50 01-12-2012 01:13 PM
Touring cars maxed out b-man777 Electric On-Road 102 08-31-2008 12:41 AM
Traction Compounds : Health Risks : what can we do about this? Martin Crisp Electric On-Road 785 06-11-2007 03:49 PM



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. It is currently 11:36 PM.


Powered By: vBulletin v3.9.2.1
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise Content © 2001-2011 RCTech.net