Go Back  R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road
Tamiya TA05 Touring Sedan >

Tamiya TA05 Touring Sedan

Like Tree25Likes

Tamiya TA05 Touring Sedan

Old 01-04-2009, 09:04 PM
  #10246  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 273
Default

Ebay seems to be your best bet, Cherokee. I found a handful of TA05 kits priced low ($99). Look for the username bboykorea382. He sells those $99 TA05 kits. IIRC the shipping is 28 bucks, which still makes it the lowest price I've seen in the past few weeks. So, if you have no objections buying straight from Hong Kong, go for it. I have bought alot of parts for my M03-L from him and have never been disappointed.

I just bought one and it's on its way in the mail.

I showed my cousin the TA05 manual (he's an r/c nut like me) and he raised a pretty good question, which I wanna ask here.

How good are the belts from this kit? Do they wear out after say, running ten times or so? I guess for reference, I'll be running a Trinity 12T dbl Speedgems Extreme in it w/ 3000mAh nimh batteries.
dragnse7en is offline  
Old 01-04-2009, 09:27 PM
  #10247  
Tech Rookie
 
brownstone101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sheridan OR
Posts: 10
Default

the belts are great depends on where you drive it though. i have heard the ta05 eats belts when u get rocks in it but i bet thats the truth or worse on other chassies out there. go ahead and get the upgrades armid belts (SP?) i went that rought and like them very much very smooth and strong belts i saved the stock ones that have plenty of inside and outside running on them and there just stretched out i soaked them in wd-40 i dont recomend that if ur gona use them dayley but the wd-40 reconditioned the belt so i can use it for a day or 2 if i do kill my armid ones. but they are strong as u want them to be.
brownstone101 is offline  
Old 01-04-2009, 09:51 PM
  #10248  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 273
Default

Thanks for the advice. I did see those aramid belts; a genuine Tamiya hop-up.

I have another question but it's probably pretty stupid.

It's not as if I'm planning to go full speed and head-on into a granite parking curb (well, maybe I might) but generally, how well can it survive a small flip or crash? Are there any "weak" parts that I should upgrade before I find out the sad way? I'll be running it in my parking lot on the weekends, and the obstacles are man-hole covers, uneven asphalt patches that fill old potholes, and of course 4 inch flat granite curbs.
dragnse7en is offline  
Old 01-04-2009, 10:28 PM
  #10249  
Tech Regular
iTrader: (4)
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Goodyear, Arizona
Posts: 280
Trader Rating: 4 (100%+)
Default

i recommend using the aramid belts from the getgo and keep the stock ones for back up!!
(at least thats what im doing)
macscac is offline  
Old 01-04-2009, 10:29 PM
  #10250  
mok
Tech Master
iTrader: (9)
 
mok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 1,075
Trader Rating: 9 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by dragnse7en View Post
Thanks for the advice. I did see those aramid belts; a genuine Tamiya hop-up.

I have another question but it's probably pretty stupid.

It's not as if I'm planning to go full speed and head-on into a granite parking curb (well, maybe I might) but generally, how well can it survive a small flip or crash? Are there any "weak" parts that I should upgrade before I find out the sad way? I'll be running it in my parking lot on the weekends, and the obstacles are man-hole covers, uneven asphalt patches that fill old potholes, and of course 4 inch flat granite curbs.
for impact damage i'd keep these parts in my pit box..
- lower arms
- c-hubs
- uprights
- damper stays

for general wear and tear items..
- belts
- diff plates and outdrives
- swing shaft protectors
- wheel axles

If you're running outside a lot on un-prepped pavement, i'd be looking at using the non-wide pitch diff pulleys as i have had too many stones wedge in between the teeth on the pulley resulting in an overtensioned and therefore snapped belt!

Thats my 2 cents anyways :P

-Mark
mok is offline  
Old 01-04-2009, 11:03 PM
  #10251  
Tech Addict
iTrader: (2)
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 538
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

Keep some lower arms hinge rods too, IIRC 49.7mm long. And the screws and collars for the front uprights/hubs too.
stocker is offline  
Old 01-04-2009, 11:24 PM
  #10252  
Tech Addict
iTrader: (5)
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Philippines
Posts: 572
Trader Rating: 5 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by redbones View Post
48P- tougher gears against crashes, sounds like a "tamiya" car, easy to mesh, less choice in gear ratio
64P- little more efficient drivetrain, sounds nice, hard to mesh, more choices in gear ratio

anything else?

I use kawada or xenon spurs. PRS is good too, but I can't seem to get them. Only can get pinions.

thanks! i love my stock 105T (64P) though, i prefer the 'quietness' and whines of it. sounds much like most of the kits with BL in my club.


@dragnse7en

i haven't broken much of my IFS R, except c hubs and knuckle arms (no belts replaced so far ). and as you get better, you'll notice that you'll be replacing less. despite my earlier reservations that it is fragile, it has proven me wrong.
Minami is offline  
Old 01-05-2009, 12:00 AM
  #10253  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 273
Default

Originally Posted by mok View Post
for impact damage i'd keep these parts in my pit box..
- lower arms
- c-hubs
- uprights
- damper stays

for general wear and tear items..
- belts
- diff plates and outdrives
- swing shaft protectors
- wheel axles

If you're running outside a lot on un-prepped pavement, i'd be looking at using the non-wide pitch diff pulleys as i have had too many stones wedge in between the teeth on the pulley resulting in an overtensioned and therefore snapped belt!

Thats my 2 cents anyways :P

-Mark
Thanks Mark I printed out the pdf manuals for the TA05 and the TA05R about a week ago, and looked up the parts and learned that the TA05R uses the wide pitch pulleys. Are the non-wide ones a hop-up option or do they come with my regular TA05 kit?

I live in New England, so I won't be running mine until late spring/ early summer. Lessons learned from my M03-L hahaaa!!!!! It just ain't like my old skool Frog - I swear that thing couldve run underwater in the ocean (yah!!!)

So, basically it sounds to me like the same spare parts I keep handy for my mini cooper, minus the belts. Now I'm kind of nervous about those belts. I'll get over it tho

But anyhoo - if you got a tamiya part # for those pulleys - lemme know so either way I can tell if they come with my kit or I need to pony up and get some.

Chances are that I'll have the aramid belts before I run it outdoors.

macscac - nice bling! what series of the 05 are you going to build, if any?
dragnse7en is offline  
Old 01-05-2009, 12:34 AM
  #10254  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 273
Default

Originally Posted by brownstone101 View Post
o ok gotcha makes sence.

front diff came lose today while practiceing threadlock should fix that problem correct??
Yeah. I'd recommend the "blue" locktite for any metal-on metal connecting parts that get exposed to high stress and/ or vibration. When I got my black steel universals for my mini cooper, tamiya's instructions called out specifically for a thread locking compound. The "blue" is fabulous for the r/c hobby, b/c its strong enuf to hold without "chemically welding" the parts together. I think its the "red" stuff to stay away from; thats for real cars and mechanics use much larger tools to break the compound than we do with our 1-2 pound r/c cars.

So, in short, look for any thread locking compound equal to Blue Locktite. Locktite seems to be the top brand name, as it is the most expensive brand I've seen.

I got mine on ebay, and it's called Pro Lok from a company called Pro Seal (part #24206.) Its a .20 fl oz red plastic bottle with a white cap, and cost me around 8 bucks after shippng as opposed to an average of 12 bucks for the Locktite brand. If you dont see the "blue" in the description of the product, just look for medium strength
dragnse7en is offline  
Old 01-06-2009, 08:31 AM
  #10255  
Tech Apprentice
 
RielTime Racing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Fort Collins
Posts: 72
Default

Originally Posted by mok View Post
for impact damage i'd keep these parts in my pit box..
- lower arms
- c-hubs
- uprights
- damper stays

for general wear and tear items..
- belts
- diff plates and outdrives
- swing shaft protectors
- wheel axles

If you're running outside a lot on un-prepped pavement, i'd be looking at using the non-wide pitch diff pulleys as i have had too many stones wedge in between the teeth on the pulley resulting in an overtensioned and therefore snapped belt!

Thats my 2 cents anyways :P

-Mark
MOK,

You really seem to have your knowlege together! Your list of replacement parts is right on. I've been racing about 6 months now. Never had any problems breaking things out doors untill going indoors. I would add
-King Pin
-Ball head King Pin
RielTime Racing is offline  
Old 01-06-2009, 09:21 AM
  #10256  
mok
Tech Master
iTrader: (9)
 
mok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 1,075
Trader Rating: 9 (100%+)
Default

...and probably a couple of flanged tubes, diff nuts, diff bolts and diff nut holders
mok is offline  
Old 01-06-2009, 09:29 AM
  #10257  
mok
Tech Master
iTrader: (9)
 
mok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 1,075
Trader Rating: 9 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by dragnse7en View Post
Are the non-wide ones a hop-up option or do they come with my regular TA05 kit?
they are in the standard TA05 kit, sold as a hop-up for that..
in the R version (and also the TA05MS) they are a standard item

Now I'm kind of nervous about those belts.
the TA05MS i regularly race has had major belt issues which is why i consider belts a must have spare..
(i wouldnt worry so much about them, i think its the design of the MS floating layshaft that causes a lot of the unnecessary belt wear)

if you got a tamiya part # for those pulleys - lemme know
51212 - TA05 Ball Diff Pulley 36T
53935 - RC Alternated Diff Pulley 36T (wide pitch)

if you're not getting belt damage, i wouldnt worry about the non-wide pitch pulleys though..
its just IMHO with low wind brushless motors there is some comfort to be had having more teeth contacting the belt (should be harder to slip etc)
mok is offline  
Old 01-07-2009, 03:44 AM
  #10258  
Tech Champion
 
tc3team's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 6,151
Default

Originally Posted by redbones View Post
In a different reason, you need some slop on the inner hinge pins on the suspension arms. If you shim them to perfection, I found that they will bind in an event of a crash or even just a rub. Reason being that the suspension blocks may shift ever so slightly that it may apply pressure on the inner hinge. That's why I give the arms a little play (~.5mm) to compensate for that. If your car acts funny after a crash, take the shocks off and check the lower arms. They should just fall down with no effort at all. Better to have a little slop and get a free moving suspension than a binding one.
+1, exactly what i'm trying to say. There should be enough "slop" to allow the arms to fall on their own with the shocks off, as with no slop at all the arms will bind up, making an ill handling car.

If anything, the only place I would suggest no slop is in the steering ballcups to allow more precise steering, but only replace the ballcups if there is excessive movement in them, it should sharpen the car up a little
tc3team is offline  
Old 01-07-2009, 06:38 AM
  #10259  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 273
Default

I've been doing some more homework on this model, and noticed that someone asked a question and I couldn't quite find an answer in this thread (although it might have been answered; I must've missed it.)

If a one-way front diff gives the car rear-only braking, how does the car brake with a center one-way pully? Is it mechanically different, or would it be the same as putting 2 one-way diffs in the car?
dragnse7en is offline  
Old 01-07-2009, 07:15 AM
  #10260  
mok
Tech Master
iTrader: (9)
 
mok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 1,075
Trader Rating: 9 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by dragnse7en View Post
I've been doing some more homework on this model, and noticed that someone asked a question and I couldn't quite find an answer in this thread (although it might have been answered; I must've missed it.)

If a one-way front diff gives the car rear-only braking, how does the car brake with a center one-way pully? Is it mechanically different, or would it be the same as putting 2 one-way diffs in the car?
here's one simple overview..

front one way with direct center - spool-like on power, rear braking only
front diff with center one way - rear braking only, adjustable diff action (loose/tight)
front one way with center one way - spool-like on power, rear braking only (same as front one way with direct center)
front diff with direct center - 4 wheel braking, no spool effect, adjustable diff action (loose/tight)

so to answer your question..

whether its a front or a center one way, they only have drive when moving forward thus any braking action on the rear belt/wheels does not affect the front belt/wheels.. that is, the front wheels are free to continue to rotate forward under braking

hope that helps.. always find it hard to explain

-Mark
mok is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.