R/C Tech Forums

Go Back   R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-01-2012, 03:22 AM   #16
Tech Lord
 
wingracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 12,861
Trader Rating: 24 (100%+)
Default

Society of Automotive Engineers.
__________________
Sean. Certified speed crazed mowron.
Team Shepherd USA
www.ashfordhobby.com
wingracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 03:40 AM   #17
Tech Adept
 
sagejyoung's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Posts: 170
Default

just sit on rctech and read read read - you could probably design the ultimate, optimized and most revolutionary car ever. the amount of field specific r and d on here is staggering....
sagejyoung is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 06:55 AM   #18
Tech Adept
 
Ariel Reds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Hiliran, Kuala terengganu
Posts: 145
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wingracer View Post
Society of Automotive Engineers.
__________________
Team Max EP Terengganu.
Kuala Terengganu Radio Control Club.
Joy and Passion, its all about.
Ariel Reds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 07:09 AM   #19
Tech Champion
 
liljohn1064's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Deerfield, WI
Posts: 5,582
Trader Rating: 17 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sagejyoung View Post
just sit on rctech and read read read - you could probably design the ultimate, optimized and most revolutionary car ever. the amount of field specific r and d on here is staggering....
A well designed car with great customer service and excellent parts support is the key. XRAY may be expensive, but they have all the bases covered in this arena.
__________________
John Higgins former student of The Ian Ruggles Negative Reinforcement Driving School. The "Team Principal".
liljohn1064 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 07:20 AM   #20
Tech Adept
 
Ariel Reds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Hiliran, Kuala terengganu
Posts: 145
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by liljohn1064 View Post
A well designed car with great customer service and excellent parts support is the key. XRAY may be expensive, but they have all the bases covered in this arena.
yes, with the RnD, factory driver, customer troubleshoot, Xray forum.
All i can say is they have one of the best customer friendly system.
__________________
Team Max EP Terengganu.
Kuala Terengganu Radio Control Club.
Joy and Passion, its all about.
Ariel Reds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 07:23 AM   #21
Tech Master
 
DS Motorsport's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 1,440
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

If you want to become a designer a degree in mechanical engineering is the thing you want.
Also start working with Cad as early as you can, I started when I was 15 and this gave me a massive head start compared to my classmates who had zero experience with it.

For understanding race car design there are some very good books available.
You can start with Tune to win by Carroll Smith. Some stuff might be a bit old but it gives you a good insight on how all the parts of the car work.
When you understand the basics and had some more advanced math classes you can look into Racecar vehicle dynamics by the Milliken brothers. This is regarded as the 'bible to race car design'.
__________________
P1-RC.com
DS Motorsport is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 07:37 AM   #22
Tech Adept
 
Ariel Reds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Hiliran, Kuala terengganu
Posts: 145
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DS Motorsport View Post
If you want to become a designer a degree in mechanical engineering is the thing you want.
Also start working with Cad as early as you can, I started when I was 15 and this gave me a massive head start compared to my classmates who had zero experience with it.

For understanding race car design there are some very good books available.
You can start with Tune to win by Carroll Smith. Some stuff might be a bit old but it gives you a good insight on how all the parts of the car work.
When you understand the basics and had some more advanced math classes you can look into Racecar vehicle dynamics by the Milliken brothers. This is regarded as the 'bible to race car design'.
the breakthrough! so the mechanical engineering course play a big role?
will do some research on this course within my country college
__________________
Team Max EP Terengganu.
Kuala Terengganu Radio Control Club.
Joy and Passion, its all about.
Ariel Reds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 08:28 AM   #23
Tech Elite
 
Rick Vessell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Mars
Posts: 2,302
Trader Rating: 9 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariel Reds View Post
the breakthrough! so the mechanical engineering course play a big role?
will do some research on this course within my country college
You will not likely find a course based on the Milliken's work in your country. Most universities in the states don't even offer it. Brent Byers, who was mentioned above, convinced one of his professors at UMass to add it for a semester for the credit.

A standard ME degree will get you started. Be sure to focus on materials since so much of what we do is dependent on that. Also read as much as you can on vehicle dynamics like the others have suggested. Check out the SAE bookstore online, they have some good stuff too. Amazon or Ebay are your best bets for finding the Milliken's book.

For CAD, Solidworks or ProE are what you are looking for. Most of the designers and factories use one or the other.

Good luck!
Rick Vessell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 08:51 AM   #24
Tech Elite
 
OSherman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: o0O In the FishBowl O0o
Posts: 3,273
Trader Rating: 3 (100%+)
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by DS Motorsport View Post
If you want to become a designer a degree in mechanical engineering is the thing you want.
Also start working with Cad as early as you can, I started when I was 15 and this gave me a massive head start compared to my classmates who had zero experience with it.

For understanding race car design there are some very good books available.
You can start with Tune to win by Carroll Smith. Some stuff might be a bit old but it gives you a good insight on how all the parts of the car work.
When you understand the basics and had some more advanced math classes you can look into Racecar vehicle dynamics by the Milliken brothers. This is regarded as the 'bible to race car design'.
i second this motion... these are regarded by some as the 'bibles' of the RaceCar Design..
__________________
•KO Propo America
•EXOTEK
OSherman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 08:58 AM   #25
Tech Elite
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Northern & Central Illinois
Posts: 4,337
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

Mechanical engineering is key to designing vehicles.

Electrical/Electronic engineering would be good for battery tech and perhaps ESCs.
AreCee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 09:45 AM   #26
Tech Master
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,117
Trader Rating: 13 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DS Motorsport View Post
Racecar vehicle dynamics by the Milliken brothers. This is regarded as the 'bible to race car design'.
^^ This. The Milliken book is indeed the bible for suspension and vehicle design. By aware, though, you need a very healthy background in physics and calculus/differential equations to be able to understand this text at any depth. Im talking about high level college courses here, not high school physics/math.

Shelby's "_____ to Win" series is also very helpful. He doesn't go into as much of the theory and governing physics equations behind things as the Milliken brothers, but that might be a good thing if you aren't up to date on your physics/math.

It has already been covered numerous times in this thread... but yes, you want a degree in ME with a focus on automotive engineering and vehicle dynamics. Secondary classes in metallurgic properties will also be very useful, as will taking tech school courses in CAD design, etc.

Things that might be of interest to you... Ive always wanted to see a miniature shock dyno for RC cars. Granted, a load cell with resolution fine enough to accurately measure dampers with such little compression/rebound force might be prohibitively expensive... but it would be VERY cool to see some force v velocity plots for RC dampers.

Also... a miniature 7-post shaker rig.

If I was pursuing an ME degree, I would love to try and tackle one of those ideas for my senior desing project.
JamesL_71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 10:31 AM   #27
Tech Master
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,085
Trader Rating: 14 (100%+)
Default

I'm also an alum of the Formula SAE series. Man I miss being in the shop building race cars and parts for my RC's.

I believe Josh Cyrul is also a Mechanical Engineer.
__________________
Speedpassion : Speedpower : East Coast Bodies
thunderbt3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 10:39 AM   #28
Tech Adept
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 131
Default

Jus't don't forget the fact, that the rc car industry isn't very big. There are only a handful of big companies in this buisness and a lot of them in Asia.
Der Dicke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 10:57 AM   #29
Tech Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Belgium
Posts: 528
Trader Rating: 6 (100%+)
Default

Personally, I'd say get a degree in physics is the way to go.
The physicists in our company can talk along with the electrics, mechanical and chemists because they got a very wide range of expertise and more, they learn how it all works together.
CAD can be learned, not that hard (at least not for RC cars...)
__________________
Make it idiot-proof, and someone will make a better idiot.
Quante is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 12:21 PM   #30
Tech Elite
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Northern & Central Illinois
Posts: 4,337
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quante View Post
CAD can be learned, not that hard (at least not for RC cars...)
I agree. I had to learn CAD to show fiber optic circuits and it was easier for me to learn than teach the CAD people how to populate the circuits.
AreCee is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ryde it like you stole it: the Ryde Drivers thread. old_skoolie Australian Racing 22990 12-13-2017 12:58 AM
F1 is alive and well in So. Cal! 240Z California Racing 5880 07-06-2012 05:36 PM
Magazine Ad innappropriate? wcalaker Chat Lounge 236 01-13-2009 10:56 PM
IS MAYFIELD SPONSORED BY GRP? TIME WARP Nitro Off-Road 52 06-13-2008 09:45 PM



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. It is currently 04:37 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
Powered By: vBulletin v3.9.2.1
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise Content © 2001-2011 RCTech.net