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Old 09-10-2011, 12:21 AM   #1
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Thumbs up Teach me a little about brushless...lol

Hey I'm learning about the brushless motors and wanted any general or advanced information about them? It's a lot different than brushed so on a gentle learning curve what can be beginning to advanced set ups, timing, winds and their relationship to esc's, batteries etc...

What is max motor for sxxv2 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, etc

Just whatever you have to say about that you know regarding onroad mostly

Thank you and I appreciate any help

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Old 09-10-2011, 12:32 AM   #2
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Basically, current needs to flow through windings in order to generate kinetic energy. Brushed motors transfer the current from, well, the brushes to the commutator, then the windings on the armature. Then it's just chain reaction onwards.

Brushless is the opposite, where the windings are static in the can (requiring no friction or electrical contact) and instead of a rotating armature, you get a rotor made of a magnet. The magnet/rotor 'follows' the switching from one stack of winding to another electromagnetically.

That's the basic, sensorless system. Sensored motors come with a sensor board and port (for the sensor cable), and can tell which position the rotor is at. This provides better reliability, and manipulation can take place (advane timing, dynamic timing etc etc)
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Old 09-10-2011, 12:45 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheapskate.brok View Post
Basically, current needs to flow through windings in order to generate kinetic energy. Brushed motors transfer the current from, well, the brushes to the commutator, then the windings on the armature. Then it's just chain reaction onwards.

Brushless is the opposite, where the windings are static in the can (requiring no friction or electrical contact) and instead of a rotating armature, you get a rotor made of a magnet. The magnet/rotor 'follows' the switching from one stack of winding to another electromagnetically.

That's the basic, sensorless system. Sensored motors come with a sensor board and port (for the sensor cable), and can tell which position the rotor is at. This provides better reliability, and manipulation can take place (advane timing, dynamic timing etc etc)
Thank you for the physics of brushless
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