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Old 04-22-2003, 12:08 AM   #1396
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Quote:
Originally posted by PizzaDude
Hi Steevo,

You're the real weightwatcher here, hahaha...

Well I'm interested in ALL the new parts.
Maybe we can put together some kind of table with original part/hop-up/newTRFhop-up.
And then with + or - weights for the weight gain-loss.

Personally I need to loose some weight fast.
BTW My car also...LOL

CU
Pizza
Too much Pizza Hut i'd say mate
I'll see what I can do. A friend of mine has the TRF version so I'll see if I can convince him to part with his car for a day.
I think you just solved my delemma on what to have for dinner...
Where's that Domino's Voucher

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Old 04-22-2003, 10:35 AM   #1397
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bon appetit
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Old 04-24-2003, 05:50 PM   #1398
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Default Well...

The kit came together yesterday. I know, long time, but I had to wait for a couple of new purchases to get here so that I could put them on the car.

Problem is, my front diffs feel like crap! I've degreased and "rebuilt" it once and still feels very gritty. Rear is smooth as glass. What the hey is going on? One theory is that I didn't spin the diff while tightening, so may have dimpled the diff plates. Any ideas?

Regardless, can't wait until Saturday
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Old 04-24-2003, 06:47 PM   #1399
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Your diffs will usually feel a little gritty when new. After a few runs they will wear in and probably need readjusting slightly.
Something you may check is the diff washers or "Plates" They will usually have one side that is slightly more polished than the other. Make sure that the polished sides are the ones that come in contact with the diff balls. If you are still not satisfied you can polish the diff plates with super fine grade wet and dry and water.

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Old 04-24-2003, 07:32 PM   #1400
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I use the anti wear grease on my ball diffs. It will feel sticky at first but ones it breaks-in, you will have one smooth diff
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Old 04-24-2003, 09:15 PM   #1401
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Here's what I do to get super smooth diffs. Build the diff per the instructions and put a small dab of hobby grease (stuff that comes in the kit) on each diff ball before assembly. Put one outdrive in the chuck of a variable speed drill. Don't over tighten the chuck because you don't want to bend the outdrive. Hold on to the pulley and run the diff for a minute or so with the drill. Keep the rpms down and if the diff starts to slip, stop immediately! You don't want to heat up the pulley or the plates and cause the plastic to melt. After a minute or so of running each diff in, I take them apart and clean out the old grease. It will be greyish in color. Re-lube with hobby grease, reassemble and you should be able to get the diff tight enough so it won't slip and still run smoothly.
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Old 04-25-2003, 12:31 PM   #1402
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Thanks guys!
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Old 04-25-2003, 01:01 PM   #1403
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Old 04-25-2003, 06:35 PM   #1404
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by adjusting the thread shock, what does it do to do the shock ?
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Old 04-25-2003, 06:49 PM   #1405
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Quote:
Originally posted by zoombie
by adjusting the thread shock, what does it do to do the shock ?
Do you mean the spring tension adjuster.
Your initial reaction will probably to use it to create more pressure to the springs thus making it firmer, but this is probably not the proper purpose. if you want to stiffen your setup use firmer springs instead.
Some people will use it help in getting rid of tweak by creating different pressures on each shocks in hopes of creating overall balance, but other says it will actually worsen the balance of the car because it is not equally distributed and you did not really get rid of the tweaked chassis. I just use them to make sure the springs is not floating in the shocks and i try to make at least the opposite side equal length.
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Old 04-25-2003, 06:56 PM   #1406
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Hmmm.... good answer.... hehehe!
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Old 04-25-2003, 07:10 PM   #1407
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Here is a good web site on about Tamiya
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Old 04-25-2003, 09:38 PM   #1408
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izzyracer

You're on the right track, but it's actually a lot simpler than that. The collars on the threaded body shocks do exactly the same thing as preload spacers on the older or lower end cars. They are used to adjust the ride height of the car. In order to have the car handle right, you need to make sure the car is balanced correctly and you end up doing fine adjustments to adjust the "tweak" on the car too, but the main purpose is ride height adjustment.
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Old 04-25-2003, 10:30 PM   #1409
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Quote:
Originally posted by psycho
izzyracer

You're on the right track, but it's actually a lot simpler than that. The collars on the threaded body shocks do exactly the same thing as preload spacers on the older or lower end cars. They are used to adjust the ride height of the car. In order to have the car handle right, you need to make sure the car is balanced correctly and you end up doing fine adjustments to adjust the "tweak" on the car too, but the main purpose is ride height adjustment.
Psycho! haha that's a classic but great name! scary! anyway, you are right they are also use to adjust ride height. But if you use it that way you also affect spring tension thus can create other issues. A good way to adjust ride height is by using spacers (plastic or rubber) inside the shock cylinder during assembly to make your shocks shorter depending on the length of your spacers which will dictate your ride height.
In other words this thing can create a lot of affects both bad and good when use properly or improperly. OH MY gOD!
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Old 04-26-2003, 05:47 PM   #1410
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izzyracer

It's a long story on my nick, but it has nothing to do with me actually being psycho! The trick with the spacers or o-rings inside the shocks is actually a trick to reduce the amount of droop or suspension down travel. You shouldn't ever use droop control to adjust the ride height. Since the TA04 has a droop adjustment on each arm, there is no need for any spacers inside the shock. You're right about using the collars to compress the springs. It's not a good idea since you lose all of your suspension downtravel. Anyways, I hope that helps clear things up!
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