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Old 06-20-2011, 03:01 AM   #16
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Well what I do is usually leave the body clear around the wheel nut of the car with the car already cut to ride height and mounted on the car i sit it on a flat surface and then take a new tire and sit it on the outside of the body and line it up to the wheel nut and with a sharpie I outline on the body where to cut. You can remove the markings with rubbing alcohol. If you don't like the price of fancy scissors or circle cutting tools go to a local Beauty supply shop or pharmacy and buy a pair of cuticle cutting scissors about 3 bucks around here.
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Old 06-20-2011, 03:20 AM   #17
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1. Outline wheel arch with very fine tipped Sharpie pen.
2. Do the rough cut with lexan scissors, try to be within 1/4inch of outlined arch.
3. Use a drum sander (1 1/2 to 2 inch diameter) attached to a drill to finish the job.
4. Quick, easy, and simple.
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Old 06-20-2011, 11:30 AM   #18
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1. Outline wheel arch with very fine tipped Sharpie pen.
2. Do the rough cut with lexan scissors, try to be within 1/4inch of outlined arch.
3. Use a drum sander (1 1/2 to 2 inch diameter) attached to a drill to finish the job.
4. Quick, easy, and simple.
I do this but use the exacto and snap the lexan
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Old 06-20-2011, 11:41 AM   #19
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olfa makes circle cutter for lexan, it's pretty neat.
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Old 06-20-2011, 12:48 PM   #20
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I do this but use the exacto and snap the lexan
I do this too; either score the Lexan & pull it apart, or cut with Lexan scissors, then clean it up with a Dremel & sanding drum attachment.
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Old 06-20-2011, 01:16 PM   #21
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I do this too; either score the Lexan & pull it apart, or cut with Lexan scissors, then clean it up with a Dremel & sanding drum attachment.
Ok hows this
If there are lines to follow, trace with a ultra fine point sharpie, then scribe with a exacto -DO NOT CUT THRU-,if no lines to follow either circle cutter or trace a round object then scribe ,either way DO NOT CUT THRU, then gently try to snap the lexan around, you may need to work it /flex the scribe line ,but it will snap off clean, then follow up with a drum sander
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Old 06-23-2011, 04:35 AM   #22
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LOL i live in Brisbane, and you do know, that you do not have to buy Hudy Lexan choppers made from their TM gotcha steel, you can find these types of hobby scissors in lots of places. If i am not mistaken, the pair i currently have in my tool kit, i stole from the wife, they were her scrapbooking scissors, they are good quality, cut clean, make from quality materials and did not cost an arm and a leg either.

VEN-0860 Venom Lexan Scissors: $6 RC Hobbies Parramatta.
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Old 06-26-2011, 10:54 PM   #23
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i like to trim my body's and mount them before i paint them.

i cut the body out mostly, and ream the mount holes. then put the body on with pins, put the car down ready to run, mark where the center of the axel is on the clear body, ream a small hole at that point. then i used a compass to draw a circle around that point and score with exacto.
though i might try that circle cutter now. one less step.

i made the mistake the first time of cutting the holes out before i had mounted it to the car. nothing lined up and i had to cut the arches crazy big.

id have to see someone mount their body post paint as im not sure how you could get things to line up with paint on there ha.
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Old 06-28-2011, 08:25 PM   #24
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Before painting the body...

- mark the body post positions (and antenna if one is in place) on the outside of the body.

- place a small piece (maybe 3/4" square) of blue painter's tape at each of the spots where the axles will be located in the wheel wells.

After painting,

- complete the holes for the body posts and cut the excess lexan from the body

- remove the tape to be able to line up my circle cutter perfectly over the axle location.

After cutting the wheel wells, I use a drum sander for any adjustments. Have a larger drum for TC bodies and and smaller one for 1/12th bodies.

I do not have the wheel wells encircle the wheels below the axle line (as some others do). Eliminates body tucks.

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Old 06-28-2011, 10:40 PM   #25
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X-acto with a sharp, new blade. HPI bodies are easy since their wheel wells are perfectly round (until you get to the base), have the dimples for the circle cutters, and well marked. Any other body though just an x-acto.

Use to have pictures of completely cut out HPI bodies in just two pieces, the body and the flash... My Associated body for the SC10 though was a little difficult (or I'm out of practice) and needed some clean-up.

Oh, and always after painting...that way you don't have the overspray films lift and let paint under them.
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Old 06-29-2011, 07:11 AM   #26
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Man I said screw it and cut before I paint.
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