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Old 05-23-2011, 09:37 PM   #61
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Adding Stormer's error correction thread to this collection of links and good information...

http://www.rctech.net/forum/electric...-thread-8.html
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Old 05-24-2011, 02:55 AM   #62
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@Art.....Wow you have a nice group or racers in here giving advice.

Aside from whats been talked about this quote above is all I can really express is a big part of being consistent. With out full control of your car you will make mistakes. Start to drive your car where you have full control over it.....if that means slowing down and braking early for a corner so you dont blow the line then so be it. The more control you have of the car the better. Its not always the fastest car that wins the race its the car that is driven the best that wins 99% of the time.

Once you master this then start to push for faster lap times but up front just strive for car control and not many mistakes. We all make mistakes but its what you do after them that will determin what your run is like.

If you get into a rythem on the track dont let a mistake or another driver take you out of it....if something happens just suck it up and keep going.

Aside from what all has been said in here.....dont be afraid to ask for any help or ask any questions when you are at The Track or any of the other local tracks. We are all more then willing to help because the faster you get the hang of it the more likely you will stick it out. So keep up the practice and see you at on the track.
Thank you Kevin, a great post by yourself also

@Art_Mighty.

I like to play on my PS3 when I am not racing, (or the PS2 sometimes) to keep my reactions good. (yes, you've guessed, racing games... F1 and rally mostly, platform games do nothing for me most of the time... )

Ok, so a PS3 controller is very much different to a stick or wheel radio and the cars on a video game are different to your r/c, but the hand/eye co-ordination is still there to help when you are back at the track.

It seems to work well for me, but it's not for everyone.

I just figured that when i'm not racing, I still need to keep my fix of racing and good car control at my side.

There are many elements to consider to being consistant with your lap times, and then how to make the lap times quicker.

Sometimes a car can be too safe to drive, so although it is consistant, it won't get you in the A main.

Speed, handling and the reactions into to them makes a hot lap, and ultimately, a hot qualifying run.

Fast lap...

It is nice to get the fastest lap when you are racing, but with this, try to cast your mind back to that single lap.

Was the car really on its limit to the point that it was undrivable? If so, you need to work on the setup to bring home the consistancy of a good run.

Otherwise, you will be over driving the car which will only lead to frustration and broken parts

Fastest qualifying (TQ)...

It speaks for itself, the car is usually at the point of where you feel comfortable with it and is sitting there in P1 for the main race/s.

If you are still not happy with the setup of the car after the last round of qualifying but you are sitting in P1, be VERY careful about changing anything on it for the main race/s, as you will have little or no time to adapt your driving to the setup changes you make.

There may be some practice allowed, but usually that time is spent reflecting on how the car has worked out over qualifying.

Hope that helps
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Old 05-24-2011, 08:03 AM   #63
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The thing that helps me the most is spending time on track by myself.

Can you dump a pack without hitting ANYTHING?

Dialed back on a conservative pace? Or full punch? If you can't lap perfectly well beyond the race duration with no one else on the track (no pressure), then what makes you think you can pull it off in a race?
My son and I are just starting out in onroad racing and this bit right here has been what I'm aiming for at the moment.

Nice and simple even for a 7 year old to understand.
We aim a bit lower though to start out with.
We focus on being able to run for 7 minutes without having to leave the drivers platform to pick our cars out of the grass.

Also focus on out-in-out in the corners, and keeping our trigger fingers relaxed ;-).

Really enjoy all the advice in this thread.
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Old 05-24-2011, 08:17 AM   #64
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My son and I are just starting out in onroad racing and this bit right here has been what I'm aiming for at the moment.

Nice and simple even for a 7 year old to understand.
We aim a bit lower though to start out with.
We focus on being able to run for 7 minutes without having to leave the drivers platform to pick our cars out of the grass.

Also focus on out-in-out in the corners, and keeping our trigger fingers relaxed ;-).

Really enjoy all the advice in this thread.

+1. Great advice

When I started out at r/c 16/17ish years ago just controlling the car around a track was a BIG challenge.

I was only a teenager then and didn't want to damage anyone elses car as well as my own, due to my inexperience.

So, I felt that time alone on the track was important, before confronting everyone else with my novice skills. I also did the challenge of going around a track without having to marshal my own car.

Eventually I found the courage to race against others, and glad I did.

We all start somewhere, so don't get flustered by the other racers and enjoy the hobby
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Old 05-24-2011, 11:55 AM   #65
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Sub'd. Awesome thread!
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Old 05-24-2011, 07:32 PM   #66
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Personally one thing I find to becoming more consistant is of course Practice as much as possible, and getting to know your gear and what it does. At the beginning of last year for me, I was always chopping and changing everything (speedie, car whatever) then I just said to myself stick with one thing and make it work. I had two cars at the time (Xray T3 and Yokomo BD5W) but when gear diffs hit the stores, I went back to the Xray purely because they (gear diffs) felt awesome to drive with in Mod, and just persisted and got it going. I also decided on a motor and speedie combo, and stuck with it! It took a while, but once I sorted everything out I was able to pull, .1, .2, .3 cons runs pretty much every run. Now this was because the car never changed and all i did was drive it and drive it. And because of this I was actually getting faster, without realizing it. Ended up battling with two of Australia's Best drivers at the track, Never being able to do that before.

Since then I have changed a lot again, and then Turning 18 didnt help (going out every weekend) My consistancy has gone a bit out of the window of late, and I am noticing I can be very fast over 1 lap (Mr 1 lap wonder) But just cant drive it as consistantly as I want. I pretty much dont practice anymore, so practice is definatly a key ingredient to becoming consistant. So im now going to do what i did last year, find a happy medium, change nothing and drive drive drive

Also! If you are having a hard time with your car and setting it up, DONT just do what most do and jump ship to another brand, it usually never works out and you just get lost. Ive seen another driver here go through around 6 different cars in about 6 months!!!! Stick and persavere with it, and youll get there in the end, feeling good about it after too.

Hope someone gets something out of my rant

Cheers,

Antoni
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Old 05-24-2011, 07:54 PM   #67
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Originally Posted by Yokomo_Ant3 View Post
Personally one thing I find to becoming more consistant is of course Practice as much as possible, and getting to know your gear and what it does. At the beginning of last year for me, I was always chopping and changing everything (speedie, car whatever) then I just said to myself stick with one thing and make it work. I had two cars at the time (Xray T3 and Yokomo BD5W) but when gear diffs hit the stores, I went back to the Xray purely because they (gear diffs) felt awesome to drive with in Mod, and just persisted and got it going. I also decided on a motor and speedie combo, and stuck with it! It took a while, but once I sorted everything out I was able to pull, .1, .2, .3 cons runs pretty much every run. Now this was because the car never changed and all i did was drive it and drive it. And because of this I was actually getting faster, without realizing it. Ended up battling with two of Australia's Best drivers at the track, Never being able to do that before.

Since then I have changed a lot again, and then Turning 18 didnt help (going out every weekend) My consistancy has gone a bit out of the window of late, and I am noticing I can be very fast over 1 lap (Mr 1 lap wonder) But just cant drive it as consistantly as I want. I pretty much dont practice anymore, so practice is definatly a key ingredient to becoming consistant. So im now going to do what i did last year, find a happy medium, change nothing and drive drive drive

Also! If you are having a hard time with your car and setting it up, DONT just do what most do and jump ship to another brand, it usually never works out and you just get lost. Ive seen another driver here go through around 6 different cars in about 6 months!!!! Stick and persavere with it, and youll get there in the end, feeling good about it after too.

Hope someone gets something out of my rant

Cheers,

Antoni
An excellent post!..
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Old 05-24-2011, 08:11 PM   #68
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An excellent post!..
Thanks Jim!


I also forgot to mention, What works for others might not work for you, so dont be afariad to be different and try other things Dont get caught up going "why does it work for them, and not me? Its all the same" You might end up going faster when you find what works for you But when your happy, stay there and just drive! I know I do some things very different to others

Cheers,

Antoni
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Old 05-24-2011, 08:15 PM   #69
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This might've been brought up before, but what about having a day or a couple of hours at the track where the fast guys can tutor drivers who want to improve? Nothing beats hands -on instructions. I would gladly pay a race fee for a driving critique. The pros could also help with chassis setup and tips.
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Old 05-26-2011, 11:03 PM   #70
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Thank you Kevin, a great post by yourself also

@Art_Mighty.

I like to play on my PS3 when I am not racing, (or the PS2 sometimes) to keep my reactions good. (yes, you've guessed, racing games... F1 and rally mostly, platform games do nothing for me most of the time... )

Ok, so a PS3 controller is very much different to a stick or wheel radio and the cars on a video game are different to your r/c, but the hand/eye co-ordination is still there to help when you are back at the track.

It seems to work well for me, but it's not for everyone.

I just figured that when i'm not racing, I still need to keep my fix of racing and good car control at my side.

There are many elements to consider to being consistant with your lap times, and then how to make the lap times quicker.
Through many hours at Gran Turismo 5, I've come to realise that after you get consistent at a lap, it might not be the fastest lap and there is much more time to be squeezed from a lap. Assuming that you can drive cleany, I've noted that there are perhaps 4 broad stages in laerning and driving a track.

Stage 1: You've learnt the basic line and way around the track. Practicing just makes it more consistent.

Stage 2: You're now more confident, attacking the same basic line with more confidence and aggression. Lap times drop a little.

Stage 3: You start discovering the little tricks in the corners. Which corners are faster when rolled through, which corners can be 'cut', away from the textbook racing lines. Lap times drop further.

Stage 4: You start to fully exploit the car's abilities to suit the track, and you begin to see a complete picture of how all the corners link up and where you can go smoothly. The fastest car speed doesn't necessarily mean the lowest laptime, it's how you exploit the specific track's width, and drive the shortest distance, consistently. This is where I am suddenly aware of a lowering in laptimes when I previously thought that I could go no faster.

Trouble is, when people just practice and practice with no real goals other than 'to go faster', they end up stuck at stage 2, and think that that's as fast as they can go. Stage 3 and 4 are like the secret stages in a video game. They take hours to find, and come with the willingness to explore alternate racing lines for hours on the track.
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Old 05-27-2011, 02:41 AM   #71
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Through many hours at Gran Turismo 5, I've come to realise that after you get consistent at a lap, it might not be the fastest lap and there is much more time to be squeezed from a lap. Assuming that you can drive cleany, I've noted that there are perhaps 4 broad stages in laerning and driving a track.

Stage 1: You've learnt the basic line and way around the track. Practicing just makes it more consistent.

Stage 2: You're now more confident, attacking the same basic line with more confidence and aggression. Lap times drop a little.

Stage 3: You start discovering the little tricks in the corners. Which corners are faster when rolled through, which corners can be 'cut', away from the textbook racing lines. Lap times drop further.

Stage 4: You start to fully exploit the car's abilities to suit the track, and you begin to see a complete picture of how all the corners link up and where you can go smoothly. The fastest car speed doesn't necessarily mean the lowest laptime, it's how you exploit the specific track's width, and drive the shortest distance, consistently. This is where I am suddenly aware of a lowering in laptimes when I previously thought that I could go no faster.

Trouble is, when people just practice and practice with no real goals other than 'to go faster', they end up stuck at stage 2, and think that that's as fast as they can go. Stage 3 and 4 are like the secret stages in a video game. They take hours to find, and come with the willingness to explore alternate racing lines for hours on the track.
Nice post

I don't try to set myself any goals when i'm on the ps3, (ok ok, I only want to beat my mate on 2 player... )

As a side note, burnout 3 takedown is the funniest 2 player racing game i've ever played on the ps2. (As is driven to destruction).

If you set yourself too much pressure, you fall off the track.

When I am rc racing, i try not to make too much notice of which car is in what position during a race. If it is noticably quicker than mine, I know usually I am being lapped and I pull over.

(I do however, note who the lead car is, as that gives me a rough indicator as to how much ground I need to make up if I am not in the lead).

But, I race at a friendly club and if anyone is come up to lap someone, they will call lapping - and we don't play that ugly game of saying "lapping" when we are not

I focus on my car and what it is doing 110% but I do not ever put excessive pressure on myself to do well. This is one reason why...


I was at a winter series carpet race once, everything was going fine for a TQ run, the adrenaline was flowing...

And then my car came out of a corner, pulled up the tape and wrapped it around the wheel and hub about 10 times

I just stood on the rostrum thinking... WTF as a marshal stood on the track with the same look as me

I've also had my own wheel overtake me on the back straight before...

I got off the rostrum with a smile on my face and some overly serious racer saying to me "why are you smiling... you're out the race?"

My reply was "because this is racing, things happen..." (still smiling).

He didn't get it... Personality = zero!

I think I have mellowed out after 17 years of racing, but if there is a close race, I won't just pull over and let the other guy win, I will fight it out

Racing should be fun, don't throw your toys out the pram when you crash out with your (for example) 1500 setup, because it changes nothing I learnt that many, many years ago.

And having fun is another factor to being consistant. When you are relaxed, you are going to stand a better chance of being consistant... go with the flow.

And get to know as many faces as you can in r/c, and try to get on well with as many as you can. Knowledge is key to getting faster - If you help others, they help you too when they can

Stay away from the trouble makers - on the track and off of it A bad vibe upsets your focus on the track.
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Old 05-27-2011, 07:21 AM   #72
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Originally Posted by outlandr91 View Post
This might've been brought up before, but what about having a day or a couple of hours at the track where the fast guys can tutor drivers who want to improve? Nothing beats hands -on instructions. I would gladly pay a race fee for a driving critique. The pros could also help with chassis setup and tips.
Guy this is a good idea I have talked about this in the past its just a matter of getting everyone out on a day. Maybe it can be worked out and we can get Paulie, Brad and Josh all out at the track one day and have a driver clinic for everyone. At the same time if you ever see any of these guys at the track just ask them for some help. If they have the time they will help I have never seen them turn anyone away.

In the summer its kinda hard to have this happen with all the other stuff going on but maybe when it gets closer to carpet season something can get worked out. Maybe we can set something up with the Midwest All-Star Carpet series this fall....
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Old 05-27-2011, 08:06 AM   #73
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Another thing I would add is to learn not to over drive. What looks to be slower on the track can in reality can be faster according to the stopwatch.

For example, if you nail the throttle until as late as possible, then brake, there's a high chance of missing the corner apex entirely and driving a little further straight into the turn as the car scrabbles to slow and turn. If you over shoot a corner by 6 inches each time, and you do this consistently over a 10 turn track, then at the end of a lap you would have driven an extra 5 feet. After 6 minutes, it all adds up.

I found that when I braked earlier and aimed tidily for the apex instead of trying a Banzai late braking style, the car looked and felt slower, but the stopwatch showed that it was actually faster. Not to mention less stressful as I no longer had to try and time the braking for the absolute last possible moment before a turn.
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Old 05-27-2011, 11:28 AM   #74
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May sound weird but trying go karting. The on road principles are pretty much the same but you will learn better to control the rear end and learn a lot about racing lines and all. The kart has a solid axle so quite easy to upset the rear... Learned a lot about carrying speed throughout the lap from my local karting track owner.....
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Old 05-27-2011, 08:31 PM   #75
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Has anybody ever practiced with the rc car simulators? One of my friends told me that it helps on bad weather days!
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