soldering flux?

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Old 02-25-2011, 01:45 PM
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Default soldering flux?

do u need to use flux for soldering an esc or can u get away without it
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:48 PM
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It is completely unnecessary for anyone that knows what they are doing. It can help make things a bit easier for the noob.

Do NOT use acid flux on any electrical connections.
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Old 02-25-2011, 02:01 PM
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ok thanks hows it makie it easier for the newbie
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Old 02-25-2011, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by theatriks View Post
ok thanks hows it makie it easier for the newbie
The solder will flow a little quicker and easier over the parts. If you know what you're doing, you can get it to flow just fine without the added mess and expense.
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Old 02-25-2011, 02:08 PM
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electronic solder has the correct non corrosive flux inside it
DO NOT USE any other flux, unless you are 100% certain its non corrosive.
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Old 02-25-2011, 02:08 PM
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Also, flux IS necessary if you are using the wrong solder. But if you go down to Radio Shack and get a roll of 60/40 rosin core, there is flux in the solder and it will work just fine on its own.
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Old 02-25-2011, 02:35 PM
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I am going to expand on what wingracer stated.

You can get by without using flux. But flux really does make soldering easier, and the finished product can turnout looking better and stronger. A shiny solder joint is a strong solder joint. If the joint is dull looking then there is a greater chance of failure. Yes even the best solder joint can fail. It is just that poor solder joints have a higher percentage chance of failure.

I solder everyday at my job and I have to use flux due to the size of the parts. Look up 0201 resistors or capacitors. On that scale you just can't get enough heat to transfer to the board without flux. This is especially true with todays lead-free solders.

Multi/rosin core solders have flux incorporated in them. So as you add solder you are also adding flux. When you are soldering you will see a wisp of smoke rise from the work site. This smoke is the flux burning off. And when the smoke stops the flux is gone, it is either time to add more flux or hope you are done working. When the flux is completely burned out of the solder, the solder will stick to the soldering iron and pull away from the work site. This can lead to solder shorts if you are not careful.
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Old 02-25-2011, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by 2xs View Post
I am going to expand on what wingracer stated.

You can get by without using flux. But flux really does make soldering easier, and the finished product can turnout looking better and stronger. A shiny solder joint is a strong solder joint. If the joint is dull looking then there is a greater chance of failure. Yes even the best solder joint can fail. It is just that poor solder joints have a higher percentage chance of failure.

I solder everyday at my job and I have to use flux due to the size of the parts. Look up 0201 resistors or capacitors. On that scale you just can't get enough heat to transfer to the board without flux. This is especially true with todays lead-free solders.
Yeah, lead free solder sux and flux is a must. Other than that, I can obtain equally good results without it in 98% of applications.

Now soldering a steel pinion gear to a steel shaft for a slotcar motor, give me silver solder and acid flux.
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Old 02-25-2011, 02:40 PM
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But if you use flux on your capacitor, your RC might become lost in time.
Better keep it under 88mph.


It's been a long week, with too little sleep and too much caffeine.
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Old 02-25-2011, 03:36 PM
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alrite thanks alot guys ,,,,,the dude down at my lhs who sold me the stuff said i should be fine without the flux
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Old 02-25-2011, 03:42 PM
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I sucked at soldering for years until someone showed me how to use flux. It makes life sooooo much easier when soldering RC items. Small price...big impact on results.
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Old 02-25-2011, 04:25 PM
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ok i hear ya any specific type of flux
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Old 02-25-2011, 06:48 PM
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I never used flux before, and then bought a little tub of it from RadioShack one day just to try it and I'm sure glad I did. I disagree that it's only something to help "noobs". It's a tool to make things easier for any experience level. Personally if there is a tool that can help make a job easier I will use it.

I use flux VERY sparingly, the first time I used it I applied too much and it gummed up a set of Dean's (you can clean it off, but you won't have to if you use the proper amount). As people have said, most solder will have the rosin flux core already. But I have found adding a tiny bit of flux to thick wire makes it much easier to tin, and also helps on Dean's or bullet connectors. It is mainly to help get things started, and once the solder is flowing/pooling onto the wire or connector the flux inside the solder core takes over.

Keep in mind that no amount of flux can make up for poor soldering equipment or technique. Upgrading from a cheap pencil-type 25W iron to a quality Hakko or Weller soldering station can be a real eye-opener if you've never used one before.
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Old 02-26-2011, 08:23 AM
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Just go and buy a roll of the radio shack 60/40 rosin core solder and you will be set.. Best solder I have ever used!!
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Old 02-26-2011, 09:38 PM
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Check out this thread:
http://www.rctech.net/forum/radio-el...correctly-not-
so-brief-lesson.html

There's a lot of things you can do to try and save money with RC. Flux is not where I would choose to do this.
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