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I need a motor lathe.

I need a motor lathe.

Old 08-04-2004, 07:42 PM
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Default I need a motor lathe.

I am looking for a motor lathe.

What do you guys think of 3racing and their lathes?

http://www.3racing.com.hk/products.jsp?prod_type1=Motor

What's the difference between their hku-1001 and hku-1002?

(I mean functionality wise)...

This lathe doesn't come with a slave motor, where can I get a slave motor and what makes agood slave motor?

Anyone willing to sell me a lathe can reply me also. Being very honest here, i am cheap so don't offer me anything over $120USD incl S&H.
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Old 08-04-2004, 08:29 PM
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You might want to consider searching for a twister lathe on ebay or the for sale section. They are very solid, and I wish I had one back in the day.

As for slave motors, you want something that'll run smooth at slow speeds. I think someone makes a 55 or 70 turn motor that can be run with a 6-cell pack or higher voltage. What you want to avoid is a motor with inconsistent torque, since you want the armature to spin at a consistent speed throughout the cut. Good luck in your search.
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Old 08-04-2004, 08:35 PM
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thx 071, i will look around for a "twister lathe".... since those hudy and other big name lathes are just far too expensive.

Whats the difference between a $10 carbide bit and a $85 carbide bit?
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Old 08-04-2004, 08:37 PM
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Default Need A Lathe?

I was in the same situation 5 years ago when I found an "almost" new Trinity Tru-Lathe with both carbide and diamond bits and a drive motor for $125. I really came out on top with that deal. Choosing a slave (or drive) motor depends on what type of power supply you use. I use a 4 cell Ni-Cd pack and a 27T GM stock motor, in which I set the timing to zero and replaced the bushings with bearings. That setup works great. Some people like to power their lathes with a 12 volt power supply. This requires a special type of motor (55T or so). From what I've read at www.rccars.com Integy offers really good deals on lathes. You may be able to get a new one with a carbide bit and a drive motor for $120 or less. Good luck!
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Old 08-04-2004, 08:49 PM
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I've never heard of a carbide bit costing $85. You may be talking about a diamond bit. A diamond bit will last much longer than carbide, but it is very fragile. It can be chipped with very little effort. It's best to stick with a $5-10 carbide bit. It'll give you a good cut and it can take the abuse that can destroy the diamond bit.
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Old 08-04-2004, 08:55 PM
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There's another thread where everyone has debated the relative merits of a diamond vs. carbide bit. A diamond bit is not a bit with a diamond as a tip. Rather, it is a bit which has a layer that includes diamonds, giving the tip hardness. A lot of people swear by the carbide bits, since they give a "smoother" cut. Start out with the carbide, then you don't have to worry about breaking an 85 dollar bit. Then, once you're confident with cuts then I would probably suggest going to a diamond bit. They potentially last for 1000s of cuts. One thing to watch out for.... A shinier cut does not nocessarily mean a better cut. Typically a mirror-like finish occurs when the tip is dull.
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Old 08-04-2004, 09:07 PM
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Hudy Lathe

nuff said
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Old 08-04-2004, 09:13 PM
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The guy stated that he didn't want to spend more than $120 for the entire setup. Do you have a Hudy you'd sell for that amount? I currently use a 5 year old Trinity Tru-Lathe and I get fantastic results. There's no reason to spend hundreds of dollars for something that does such a simple task. Nuff said?????
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Old 08-04-2004, 09:34 PM
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Whatever you get make sure you get V-guides, not ball bearings, as they can foul up. Use the search function and you'll find alot of helpful info on lathes.
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Old 08-04-2004, 10:19 PM
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Originally posted by tmeeks
The guy stated that he didn't want to spend more than $120 for the entire setup. Do you have a Hudy you'd sell for that amount? I currently use a 5 year old Trinity Tru-Lathe and I get fantastic results. There's no reason to spend hundreds of dollars for something that does such a simple task. Nuff said?????
O darn I somehow managed to overlook that at the bottom of his post anyway like fatdoggy said make sure you get one with V-guides

good luck
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Old 08-04-2004, 11:48 PM
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Thanks for all the great advice.

Yea, what is the difference b/w the "v guides" and ball bearings model?

I realize the normal budget people allocate for a lathe is like $200, but that is really far too much for me....

I am just wondering.... if i want a "steady" lathe motor... the mabuchi 540 (or whatever that motor that comes w/ all those tamiya cars)... will that work? or a johson 540 would those work? or they are not steady enuf at slow rev for the job?
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Old 08-04-2004, 11:49 PM
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And the fw05R is a f*ck*ng crazy car.
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Old 08-05-2004, 12:35 AM
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rcnewb2004 - The silver can tamiya motors would work fine. I used a 55t integy lathe motor with a 4 cells. The key is not to have the arm spinning too quickly or you'll get a crap cut. V-guides are basically solid blocks of either steal or carbide, they can wear out over time but can't foul-up with metal shavings the way bearing guides can.

p.s. - I've posted in the big jim forum asking about the off power timing question since I don't know why. I'll quote BJ in the other thread if I get a responce.
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Old 08-05-2004, 12:59 AM
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thanks fatdoggy.

its actually sorta a gold can... but its like the crappy motor that comes w/ most models of TL-01. I will put my old cells together and make 4 pack.

and thanks once again. It would be awesome toget some help from BJ.
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Old 08-05-2004, 01:08 AM
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I've heard a lot of good things about Cobra lathes. They sell a well built, reasonably priced lathe that only runs about $100 new. It includes a carbide bit.

https://www.ssl-stormerhobbies.com/c....pl?pn=COB2000

And here's the integy 55 turn lathe motor. The advantage to using a motor specifically designed for lathes is that you can then use any of your standard 6 cell packs to power it, instead of needing a 4 cell pack like you would with a 27 turn motor.

https://www.ssl-stormerhobbies.com/c...?pn=INTSCM5501
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