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Old 09-14-2006, 09:37 AM   #9031
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I'm hoping I have figured it out. I remembered a few months ago I shimmed the driveshaft on the left side with a .5 toe-in shim to get rid of some slop in the drive shaft. Maybe it needs that little bit a wiggle room.

Jeff,
Yes I have tried a brand new belt making sure not to stretch it with no guide.
I usually run without a guide, I just tried it last time to see if it made a difference.

So I will try a new belt, with the shim removed and no belt tensioner and see what happens.

Thanks guys for all the responses. Hopefully this does the trick!

Woody
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Old 09-14-2006, 09:51 AM   #9032
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syndr0me
Hmm, didn't know that. I'll give it a try on the next rebuild and see how it works out. A little more grab is really all it needs.
Definately AE Black Grease or something similar for the Thrust. Never a lite or silicone lube. Generally a thicker lube can smooth the cars steering feel, especially mid corner and on-power out of corners, but usually only needed for modified and in the front diff. But since your running a 4300-it might be a good thing. You can also try Losi grease thats a tan color. another option is to run carbide diff balls for mod and 19t. I prefer ceramic diff balls and AE Stealth lube in any diff for stock racing though.
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Old 09-14-2006, 09:58 AM   #9033
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rayhuang
Definately AE Black Grease or something similar for the Thrust. Never a lite or silicone lube. Generally a thicker lube can smooth the cars steering feel, especially mid corner and on-power out of corners, but usually only needed for modified and in the front diff. But since your running a 4300-it might be a good thing. You can also try Losi grease thats a tan color. another option is to run carbide diff balls for mod and 19t. I prefer ceramic diff balls and AE Stealth lube in any diff for stock racing though.
Great info, thank you. I never realized people tuned their diff action with different types of grease. Just when I think I've got my head around R/C, something new surprises me. It sucks to wait a week to try this stuff out.

The MuchMore lube is the black stuff meant for thrust bearings, and seems to work well. I didn't notice a difference in the feel with it vs. the Associated black grease.

Would the carbide balls have more grab? That's an interesting thought.
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Old 09-14-2006, 10:06 AM   #9034
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I would say it goes lile this:

Grab or friction from higest to lowest

Carbide
Chrome
Ceramic


Smoothness

Ceramic
Carbide
Chrome

Durability (No slipping)

Ceramic
Carbide
Chrome

Cost

Ceramic (except dont need to be replaced very often, but rings do)
Carbide
Chrome

of note in friction-it goes hand in hand with how much lube is used, what kind of lube and how tight you need to set diff. Ive used some lubes that wre so slick that I couldnt tighten diff enough to ever stop slipping, at least not till diff was locked up solid. Thats why i prefer stealth lube and very little of it. Diff is smooth, while not slipping at a lower amount of pressure.
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Old 09-14-2006, 11:20 AM   #9035
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hey jeff
do u known if corally as spoken to b kinwald he just sign with x-factory in offroad that would be great to have kinwald with corally for on-road!!!
and jeff thanks again your service is the best !!
Pete68
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Old 09-14-2006, 06:43 PM   #9036
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something else about diffs i was told if you run ceramic balls no lube is needed anyone else hear of that???
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Old 09-14-2006, 07:34 PM   #9037
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Trust me, you want lube. Lube is good lol.

-Korey
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Old 09-14-2006, 08:59 PM   #9038
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I'm not even goin there Korey...
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Old 09-14-2006, 11:20 PM   #9039
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Yea I figured you would get a kick out of that
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Old 09-15-2006, 07:14 AM   #9040
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"hey jeff
do u known if corally as spoken to b kinwald he just sign with x-factory in offroad that would be great to have kinwald with corally for on-road!!!
and jeff thanks again your service is the best !!
Pete68"

Jeff left yesterday morning for New England and then Las Vegas. He'll be back in 11 or 12 days, and he'll probably be absent from the forum in the meantime.
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Old 09-16-2006, 05:53 PM   #9041
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I picked up a used RDX off the board and was showing it to a machinst friend of mine. He was impressed with the machine work on the car. We were wondering what grade of aluminum the duraluminum is? I did a search and couldn't find the answer. Thanks
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Old 09-16-2006, 07:50 PM   #9042
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duraluminum is a ficticious name that they must call it.aluminum alloys are specified using codes such as 6061-T6 which is 6061 aluminum with a temper rating of 6.usually when you get into names like that it is a sort of casting.i have a job that uses bronze cast tubing and they call it "durabar".from looking at the rdx,it is not cast aluminum.the material that would be best suited for the car and what they are probably using would be 6061-T6.
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Old 09-16-2006, 09:19 PM   #9043
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I think it's actually "Coraluminum" hence the name Corally. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I remember reading something about the original SP10 waaaay back in the early 90's that the entire car was made out of "Coraluminum"
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Old 09-16-2006, 09:40 PM   #9044
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Duralumin (also called duraluminum, duraluminium or dural) is the name of one of the earliest types of age-hardenable aluminium alloys. The main alloying constituents are copper, manganese and magnesium. A commonly used modern equivalent of this alloy type is AA2024, which contains (in wt.%) 4.4% copper, 1.5% magnesium and 0.6% manganese. Typical yield strength is 450 MPa, with variations depending on the composition and temper[1].

Duralumin was developed by the German metallurgist Alfred Wilm at Dürener Metallwerke Aktien Gesellschaft. In 1903, Wilm discovered that after quenching, an aluminium alloy containing 4% Cu would slowly harden when left at room temperature for several days. Further improvements led to the introduction of Duralumin in 1909[2]. The name is today obsolete, and mainly used in popular science to describe the Al-Cu alloy system, or 2000 series as designated by the Aluminum Association.

Its first use was rigid airship frames. Its composition and heat-treatment were a wartime secret. With this new rip-resistant mixture, duralumin quickly spread throughout the aircraft industry in the early 1930s, where it was well suited to the new monocoque construction techniques that were being introduced at the same time. Duralumin also is popular for use in precision tools such as levels because of its light weight and strength.

Although the addition of copper improves strength, it also makes these alloys susceptible to corrosion. For sheet products, corrosion resistance can be greatly enhanced by metallurgical bonding of a high-purity aluminium surface layer. These sheets are referred to as Alclad, and are commonly used by the aircraft industry[3].

More than you really wanted to know
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Old 09-16-2006, 09:43 PM   #9045
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I found that information when I did a search at Google, but wasn't sure if that was the same stuff.

Thanks for the info... we're looking at anodizing the aluminum parts
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