R/C Tech Forums

Go Back   R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-07-2010, 05:45 AM   #1
Tech Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 289
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default Safer Barrier for your carpet track

As anyone who has seen a Nascar race in the last 5 or so years knows, a Safer Barrier is a wall that has some give to it so when a car hits it, it absorbs some of the impact. It has drastically reduced the number of injuries in racing.

Our carpet track has a 3/4 plywood wall at the end of the straight that takes a beating. It is so chewed up that if you get into it, it has a tendency to rip parts off your car. It actually has a hole it it at one point.

We were talking about replacing the plywood when I came up with this idea. I installed it a couple of weeks ago and it looks to be working better than I had hoped. It is much more durable than wood and it is very kind to cars that aren't so kind to it. Here's how you can make one.

You will need a sheet of 3/4 inch MDF (Medium Density Fiber board). A sheet of plastic laminate like Formica or Wilsonart. Get the cheap stuff. A can of contact cement and a throw away 3 inch natural bristle brush. Some 3/4" by 6" metal straps. Some 3/4" screws. A can of Great Stuff window and door insulation (the stuff that expands less). Some foam carpet padding. A roll or two of double sided carpet tape. Some 2 inch flat head screws so you can counter sink them. Adjust quantities for the length of wall you are making

Here's how you make it.
1. Put a generous coat of contact cement on the MDF and the back of the plastic laminate. Let it dry for about a half hour or until it is no linger glossy.
2. Place some dowels or whatever on the MDF to hold the laminate up off the MDF while you position the laminate it over the MDF.
3. Place the laminate on the spacers and align it the best you can with one edge of the MDF. Starting at one end, remove one spacer/dowel at a time and press the laminate into the MDF. You don't get a second chance at positioning this stuff. Once the two pieces touch, they are stuck, so make sure you have it where you want it. After you have all the spacers removed, put it on the floor and walk on it a bit to press the two pieces together and make the glue bond well. Congratulations! You just made a kitchen counter top.
4. Rip your counter top into 4 inch wide strips. Cut the ends to make them square. I used a table saw and miter saw but you could use just about anything.
5. Cut your carpet padding into 3 inch strips.
6. Take all this stuff to the track
7. Lay out your 4 inch strips face down along the wall you will be adding this too and cut one of them to length to match the length of the wall you are applying this to.
8. Using one of the strips as a straight edge, butt two strips together and fasten them together with two of your metal straps and 3/4 inch screws. Place the straps about 3/4 inch in from the edge. Continue until you have assembled the wall.
9. Apply carpet tape to the back of the MDF between the straps.
10. Apply carpet padding to the tape. Don't put the padding past the ends of metal straps.
11. With a few buddies, roll the wall up on edge and place it along the wall.
12. Drill one hole through the center of the wall about 1 inch from each butt joint and one about 3 inches from each end. Counter sink these holes well so the screw is recessed about 1/4 inch. Use the 2 inch screws to fasten the new wall to the old wall. Do not compress the carpet padding. Just tight enough to hold the new wall lightly against the old wall.
13. Use your can of Great Stuff window and door insulation to fill the area between the walls where there is no carpet padding. It will expand a little so don't get too crazy. The screws you just put in will keep the expanding foam from pushing the walls apart.

That's it. Now all you have to do is install a low turn motor in your car and squeeze the trigger.
woodys3b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2010, 10:43 AM   #2
Tech Lord
 
Hebiki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Chino, CA
Posts: 12,919
Trader Rating: 26 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodys3b View Post
As anyone who has seen a Nascar race in the last 5 or so years knows, a Safer Barrier is a wall that has some give to it so when a car hits it, it absorbs some of the impact. It has drastically reduced the number of injuries in racing.

Our carpet track has a 3/4 plywood wall at the end of the straight that takes a beating. It is so chewed up that if you get into it, it has a tendency to rip parts off your car. It actually has a hole it it at one point.

We were talking about replacing the plywood when I came up with this idea. I installed it a couple of weeks ago and it looks to be working better than I had hoped. It is much more durable than wood and it is very kind to cars that aren't so kind to it. Here's how you can make one.

You will need a sheet of 3/4 inch MDF (Medium Density Fiber board). A sheet of plastic laminate like Formica or Wilsonart. Get the cheap stuff. A can of contact cement and a throw away 3 inch natural bristle brush. Some 3/4" by 6" metal straps. Some 3/4" screws. A can of Great Stuff window and door insulation (the stuff that expands less). Some foam carpet padding. A roll or two of double sided carpet tape. Some 2 inch flat head screws so you can counter sink them. Adjust quantities for the length of wall you are making

Here's how you make it.
1. Put a generous coat of contact cement on the MDF and the back of the plastic laminate. Let it dry for about a half hour or until it is no linger glossy.
2. Place some dowels or whatever on the MDF to hold the laminate up off the MDF while you position the laminate it over the MDF.
3. Place the laminate on the spacers and align it the best you can with one edge of the MDF. Starting at one end, remove one spacer/dowel at a time and press the laminate into the MDF. You don't get a second chance at positioning this stuff. Once the two pieces touch, they are stuck, so make sure you have it where you want it. After you have all the spacers removed, put it on the floor and walk on it a bit to press the two pieces together and make the glue bond well. Congratulations! You just made a kitchen counter top.
4. Rip your counter top into 4 inch wide strips. Cut the ends to make them square. I used a table saw and miter saw but you could use just about anything.
5. Cut your carpet padding into 3 inch strips.
6. Take all this stuff to the track
7. Lay out your 4 inch strips face down along the wall you will be adding this too and cut one of them to length to match the length of the wall you are applying this to.
8. Using one of the strips as a straight edge, butt two strips together and fasten them together with two of your metal straps and 3/4 inch screws. Place the straps about 3/4 inch in from the edge. Continue until you have assembled the wall.
9. Apply carpet tape to the back of the MDF between the straps.
10. Apply carpet padding to the tape. Don't put the padding past the ends of metal straps.
11. With a few buddies, roll the wall up on edge and place it along the wall.
12. Drill one hole through the center of the wall about 1 inch from each butt joint and one about 3 inches from each end. Counter sink these holes well so the screw is recessed about 1/4 inch. Use the 2 inch screws to fasten the new wall to the old wall. Do not compress the carpet padding. Just tight enough to hold the new wall lightly against the old wall.
13. Use your can of Great Stuff window and door insulation to fill the area between the walls where there is no carpet padding. It will expand a little so don't get too crazy. The screws you just put in will keep the expanding foam from pushing the walls apart.

That's it. Now all you have to do is install a low turn motor in your car and squeeze the trigger.
got pix?
__________________
Hebiki Design Works
Custom R/C Vinyl Graphics & Apparel: Your gear, your way!
Web Design - Web Development - Logo Design - Graphic Design
www.facebook.com/HebikiDesignWorks
Hebiki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2010, 11:52 AM   #3
Tech Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 289
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

I thought someone would ask. I'll be at the track again on Saturday. I'll take a few pics then. Should have taken some as I was building it but it didn't cross my mind.
woodys3b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2010, 12:12 PM   #4
Tech Apprentice
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 78
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

Nice post.. This looks like it would work great..
slashman4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2010, 07:25 PM   #5
Tech Rookie
 
athaler29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 12
Default

I've seen people use a pool noodle, lol. Strap it to a piece of lexan and secure it to the walls. Worked good!
athaler29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2010, 11:31 PM   #6
Tech Master
 
HB Moose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Surf City, USA
Posts: 1,080
Default

At the old So Cal I made pole protectors with garden hose and empty soda bottles. The trick to any of these is a hard & flexible outer layer with a forgiving backing. If the outer layer is too soft it will grab the cars. If its too stiff you lose the cushion effect.

I don't know about using the spray in foam. Once its crushes it doesn't recover its shape.
__________________
Bruce "Moose" Riedinger
HB Moose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2010, 05:27 AM   #7
Tech Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 289
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HB Moose View Post
At the old So Cal I made pole protectors with garden hose and empty soda bottles. The trick to any of these is a hard & flexible outer layer with a forgiving backing. If the outer layer is too soft it will grab the cars. If its too stiff you lose the cushion effect.

I don't know about using the spray in foam. Once its crushes it doesn't recover its shape.
The spray foam is only 6 inches every 6 feet. It supports the butt joint so the two pieces don't become misaligned during an impact. It really doesn't absorb any of the impact. The other 5 1/2 feet are backed with the carpet padding. The trick is only hitting the wall where it is backed by the carpet padding.
woodys3b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2010, 07:07 AM   #8
Tech Master
R/C Tech Elite Subscriber
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Grand Portage, MN
Posts: 1,368
Trader Rating: 41 (100%+)
Default

What we do is for the entire track dividers and surround we use plastic almost square downspout (for your ease troughs sp?) to hold it down we drill and screw (into concrete) boards inside the downspout that are narrower than the plastic in 3 spots (the 2 joints and one in the middle)

This gives is us a very durable, Soft, track layout. very little breaking. and where we had to have a joint on a sweeper that some people like to cut the corner too close and hit it is a piece of flat plastic that we screwed to the pipe on one side of the joint and then to the other side while leaving about a 2" gap between the plastic piece and the joint where we pit some just flat packing foam .

This allows some give and a slippery surface to deflect the cars without harm
jdeadman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. It is currently 01:52 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
Powered By: vBulletin v3.9.2.1
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise Content © 2001-2011 RCTech.net