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-   -   When it comes to kit construction is this being to picky. . . . (https://www.rctech.net/forum/electric-road/41860-when-comes-kit-construction-being-picky.html)

Mabuchi540 06-01-2004 08:01 PM

When it comes to kit construction is this being to picky. . . .
 
Ensuring that every screw on a particular component has the same amount of torque applied and if a two speed gearbox recommends a shifting point of 2500rpm for example I'll get a rev counter to ensure that it does and I don't mean 2499 or 2501 it will be 2500.

I ask because that's how I used to do it in off-road but as has been pointed out on my other thread todays kits are tougher than I might recall so I don't want to waste my time where its not needed.

StephenSobottka 06-01-2004 08:06 PM

Torquing(sp?) might not be too bad of an idea, it would give the car a good overall tweak, and the gear cases would be evenly pressed down. Thus not crushing one bearing more than the other.

Mabuchi540 06-01-2004 08:12 PM


Originally posted by Trinityracinnut
Torquing(sp?) might not be too bad of an idea, it would give the car a good overall tweak, and the gear cases would be evenly pressed down. Thus not crushing one bearing more than the other.
Glad to hear it although it tends to take me a couple of nights to put a kit together this way. I usually go o.m.g when I here people say they do it in a few hours.

StephenSobottka 06-01-2004 08:15 PM

It all depends on how picky people get. I like my cars to look good when I am done with them. I pick off all the burrs and round all the square edges on everything.

ottoman 06-01-2004 08:28 PM

Hey Stephen... you can come over and make my cars look pretty too:sneaky:
There is nothing wrong with taking your time and making sure everything is right but you can take it too far. When I build a new kit it takes me two nights or about 6 to 8 hours. As long as the drive train and suspension is free and the car tweaks out nice I dont think much else will show up on the track... just my opinion
But heck its a hobby and supposed to be fun... if you enjoy perfection have at it:)

JimmyMac 06-01-2004 08:38 PM

Takes me a week to build a kit. But this factors in work, eat, sleep.. blah blah blah. I like to take my time and cut the burrs off. Build everything nice and slow. Maybe 2-3 hours a night. So maybe up to 15 hours til it's complete and ready to go. I don't "measure" how tight I do the screws. You just need to know generally how tight they should be by hand or finger when goin into plastic, metal, aluminium, etc. I'm not anal about it or anything.

Simon K 06-02-2004 12:04 AM

2 speed gearbox...not an issue with an electric tourer as they are illegal(for competition)and rarely sold anymore.

Torqueing screws?...unnecessary. Tighten til they just snug down on plastic components, such as gearbox housings, shock tower mounts etc.. Most are composite plastics and will strip threads easily if you over tighten then.

As far as thread locking compounds, a small blob on screws that thread into steering posts doen't hurt. I use the Tamiya threadlock as it's enough to stop screws loosening off without glueing parts together forever.

Mabuchi540 06-02-2004 12:14 AM


Originally posted by Simon K
2 speed gearbox...not an issue with an electric tourer as they are illegal(for competition)and rarely sold anymore.

Torqueing screws?...unnecessary. Tighten til they just snug down on plastic components, such as gearbox housings, shock tower mounts etc.. Most are composite plastics and will strip threads easily if you over tighten then.

As far as thread locking compounds, a small blob on screws that thread into steering posts doen't hurt. I use the Tamiya threadlock as it's enough to stop screws loosening off without glueing parts together forever.

I know that much, I was talking back in the days of the Mini Mustang. :P

Simon K 06-02-2004 12:31 AM

LOL, I had a mate adjust mine, I bought it second hand and had no idea what was going on. I don't think the car finished too many races anyway with bits falling off it at irregular intervals. :rolleyes:

Several big differences between now and then... Instruction manuals are generally excellent now, compared to what you or I dealt with back then. If you still have a problem, there's always a resource like this forum to use too.

The materials used in the kits are heaps better and you often can buy a kit that needs no extra parts to be competitive...unlike the old days with buying a CAT XL then all the MMS parts to rid it of the integrator and rear diff...or the Mini Mustang and hoping the plastic bits wouldn't just fly off it...

evaa 06-02-2004 01:38 AM

a team member was converting his yok sd to the rayspeed chasis. he was filing the bat slots when he noticed that in one of the slots the bat hangs a bit lower (mind you, if you install the bats, the one where he over filed will not actually hang out coz the packs are glued together right?) so what did he do? well, simply, he bought another rayspeed chasis and kept the one that was not done perfectly. talk about perfection.;)

DOMOisCOOL 06-02-2004 01:46 AM


Originally posted by evaa
a team member was converting his yok sd to the rayspeed chasis. he was filing the bat slots when he noticed that in one of the slots the bat hangs a bit lower (mind you, if you install the bats, the one where he over filed will not actually hang out coz the packs are glued together right?) so what did he do? well, simply, he bought another rayspeed chasis and kept the one that was not done perfectly. talk about perfection.;)
He must have a big wallet!:rolleyes:

Dragonfire 06-02-2004 06:01 AM

A well assembled car will always perform better with fewer probs... take your time, make everything neat and clean and if u have access to torque wrench, then y not... but i don't think that it is nessasary.. judging by feel is fine... u won't get time to use your torque wrench at the track when u r rebuilding your car between heats....

jeepnyy 06-02-2004 01:04 PM

Re: When it comes to kit construction is this being to picky. . . .
 

Originally posted by Mabuchi540
Ensuring that every screw on a particular component has the same amount of torque applied
What kind of TORQUE WRENCH are you using that will fit the size of nuts & bolts that are in 1/10th scale cars??? At what torque setting do you set them at ???
I wanted to be as picky as you are.......but I have to know this from you........??????

Please post brand, model and pictures of all your equipment that you use. Iam very interested to see & possibly get hold of them.
Thanx

Mabuchi540 06-02-2004 04:05 PM

Re: Re: When it comes to kit construction is this being to picky. . . .
 

Originally posted by jeepnyy
What kind of TORQUE WRENCH are you using that will fit the size of nuts & bolts that are in 1/10th scale cars??? At what torque setting do you set them at ???
I wanted to be as picky as you are.......but I have to know this from you........??????

Please post brand, model and pictures of all your equipment that you use. Iam very interested to see & possibly get hold of them.
Thanx

There isn't a model or brand dude it's a home made idea. Tighten them up as you normally would then back of a fraction then use a set weight hanging on the end of (and across) the screwdriver and the weight gives it that same final tweak each time.

DaveW 06-02-2004 05:34 PM

Fast on the bench = slow on the track.

- DaveW


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